Importing Bitcoin from a paper wallet into Electrum The ...

Was using bitcoin-qt on OSX, blockchain got corrupted and now it is impossibly big to re-download, what thin clients can I import my wallet.dat into?? OSX 10.7.5. I already tried electrum and looks like I'd have to build it from github, can't figure it out. please help.

Send help! is there a safe way I could download a torrent of the blockchain? i tried to reindex the blockchain (after my harddrive got unplugged while bitcoin-qt was running) and it looks like it would literally take a week of spinning my poor laptop fan balls out.
edit: wallet.dat is encrypted and safely backed up.
submitted by sporabolic to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can I import my wallet.dat file from Bitcoin-qt into Electrum or some other light-weight or online wallet?

I can't get the entire blockchain on my computer, but I have the wallet.dat file from Bitcoin-qt. I'm wondering if there is an online wallet or other light-weight wallet I can import the wallet.dat file into and send my bitcoin out to my electrum wallet.
I just need to get my bitcoin out of the bitcoin-qt client with nothing but the wallet.dat file.
I'm on a mac.
submitted by xintox2 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can I import my wallet.dat file from Bitcoin-qt into Electrum or some other light-weight or online wallet? /r/Bitcoin

Can I import my wallet.dat file from Bitcoin-qt into Electrum or some other light-weight or online wallet? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Storing your coins safely while not risking loss of keys

This was originally an answer to a question that was asked here, but OP deleted their post.
This might help some newbies (especially the multisig edit at the end), so I want to make sure it's still accessible here.
The original question was whether the Electrum wallet stores a Trezor's private key when using a passphrase.
OP noticed that their Trezor wouldn't connect to their Electrum wallet when entering a different passphrase than they used when creating the wallet. Thus, OP (likely) assumed that the wallet stored the private key, as it somehow knew that a different private key was now used.
Here is my original answer (with some modifications):
IMPORTANT: I'm assuming here that you connected your Trezor by choosing the "hardware wallet" option in Electrum, rather than giving Electrum your 12/24 seed words.
TL;DR: No, your coins are safe :)
I'm assuming by passphrase) you mean the 25th (or 13th) word. When you have this feature enabled, a private key gets generated every time you enter a passphrase. When you enter the same passphrase you used to create the wallet, the wallet with your funds shows up.
Whenever you enter something different, a different private key is generated on your Trezor. This allows you to have multiple different wallets, for example by choosing the passphrases "First Wallet", "Second Wallet", "Third Wallet", or a secret wallet with a secret passphrase.
So whenever you enter a new passphrase when connecting your Trezor to Electrum, the Trezor will send a new public key to Electrum. Electrum will then derive addresses from this public key and check those for balances. It won't find any, as you used a new passphrase.
EDIT: I just realized that you said your wallet doesn't connect to Electrum when you use a different passphrase. This is simply because Electrum doesn't receive the correct public key from the Trezor and therefore Electrum thinks it's a different wallet (which it is).
When you enter the passphrase you used during creation of your wallet, the Trezor will send your actual public key to Electrum, which will then find addresses with balances, which it will show to you. EDIT (to clarify): Connecting your Trezor after creating the wallet is only necessary to send funds or verify addresses, as the public key is already stored in the wallet.dat.
The only thing Electrum actually stores is the public key, which can only be used to look at your Bitcoin, not to move them. You might want to keep this public key a secret as well though, since it links all your funds to you. This is what Electrum stores in the wallet.dat file, which you can just encrypt by choosing a password for it.
Well done using a passphrase by the way! Should someone get their hands on your Trezor, a sophisticated attacker can get the secret key off the device in 15 minutes. Using a passphrase makes this attack almost useless, as the both secret key AND the passphrase are needed to move your funds, and the passphrase is not stored on the device. A passphrase also allows you to hide funds from potential robbers that force you to unlock your wallet.
You can do this by activating the passphrase feature and sending your funds to a wallet with a secret passphrase (do NOT lose this, as losing your passphrase renders your funds inaccessible). Afterwards, you can safely deactivate the passphrase feature, so the device doesn't even ask for one should you get robbed. Simply reactivate it when you need to access your funds.
EDIT: Should you be worried that you might forget your passphrase, you should look into multisig wallets. Depending on how you set this up, you can make it more secure against theft and less likely for you to lose access to your funds.
Say for example you get four wallets: two hardware wallets, a well-protected (airgapped) laptop with Electrum, and a secure mobile wallet that allows for multisig (like Fully Noded).
You can then create a 2-of-4 multisig wallet that requires you to sign transactions with any two of these four wallets.
The increase in security comes from the fact that an attacker now needs full access to two of your devices (or their stored private keys) at once.
At the same time, the fact that you yourself now also need access to only half of your devices means that in the event of a total loss of one (or even two) of them, you can still move your funds to a new wallet.
As long as you do regular checks (e.g. first day of each month), ensuring that you still have access to all your devices' stored private keys, you can always catch a loss of keys and fix this without losing funds (by creating a new multisig wallet and sending the funds there).
This allows you to use a passphrase on your wallets without storing it anywhere physically or digitally. This would usually be very risky, as forgetting the passphrase would lead to a loss of funds, but this risk is now close to eliminated.
(The following part was not in the original answer)
Some IMPORTANT general secruity tips:
  1. Consider including trusted friends and/or family members as co-signers for a multisig wallet. This ensures that it's not even possible for you alone to hand over funds to an attacker. Depending on your level of trust, you might want to make sure that your co-signers can't collaborate to steal your funds (if you include 3 people, create at least a 4-of-n multisig). You could also deliberately make it possible for all or even just some of your co-signers to move your funds (3 co-signers, 3(or less)-of-n multisig) to make sure your funds aren't lost should pass away unexpectedly.
  2. Consider running your own full node and Electrum server (also check the alternatives), which you connect your Electrum wallet to. This ensures that you don't send your public key to anyone else. If someone knows your public key, they know how much BTC you own, making you a potential target.
  3. Always encrypt your wallet.dat (or whatever you called your wallet file), even if it's a watch-only wallet. This protects your public key (see 1. for why you want that).
  4. Create watch-only wallets: Use an airgapped) device to create a wallet with Electrum (make sure to back up the seed phrase) and export the public key. Then create a new watch-only wallet on another device (like your everyday laptop) with that public key to be able to check your funds. To create the initial wallet, you can also use any other hard- or software wallet that allows you to export the master public key.
  5. Hide, or (when using a hardware wallet with a passphrase) even delete your watch-only wallets. Hiding your funds makes you less of a target. When using a hardware wallet, recreating the watch-only wallet is fast and simple, so you don't need to store it if you don't want to check your funds every day. Note that this approach doesn't help much when you don't use a passphrase, as an attacker will obviously check the passphrase-less wallet no matter what.
  6. Keep some funds on your hardware wallet(s). If an attackers sees funds on the wallet(s), they might not force you to enter a passphrase or ask if you have any multisig wallets (lying under pressure is hard).
  7. Hide all your wallets in different places. If someone sees that you have multiple wallets lying around, they might realize you have a multisig wallet.
  8. Don't risk a robber getting (for example) two keys to your 2-of-4 multisig wallet and then racing them to move your funds with the other two keys when they leave. They're gonna come back and be pissed. If it comes to this, you need protection until the robber is caught. STAY SAFE!
  9. The easiest way to solve a problem is to never have it. Don't make yourself a target. If nobody even suspects that you have a multisig (or any wallet at all), they're probably not gonna look for it.
Please correct any mistakes you find and I will edit my post. I will also gladly add more tips to the list. I will of course credit anyone who helps.
Tip for devs who want something cool and important to work on: Make the creation and usage of multisig wallets as noob-friendly as possible. If someone expresses worries about losing access to their funds by forgetting the seed phrase, wallet pin, etc. (someone in my family actually brought this up to me), multisig wallets are the perfect solution as they add redundancy.
submitted by Fittiboy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

weird behavior of electrum+bitcoin-qt

past week installed the new plugin that allow me to connect my electrum wallet to bitcoin-core, i use a hardware wallet and worked like a charm.
Then today was updating the node and used bitcoin-qt instead of bitcoind and when was waiting suddendly i see some text in the gui where it says "recent transactions", and a lot of transactions where there.
Then was like WTF happened here, someone stole my btc?, or installed a compromised version of electrum(i use archlinux and install from the repos). Why some transactions where there, i neved imported my wallet to bitcoin-gui.
Inmediately deleted the wallet.dat and did the same in electrum, but my question is:
Was something imported into bitcoin-qt?, all my history was redeable from the gui, i never imported into bitcoin-qt, and as far i know the seed never leave the hardware wallet.
This is normal?, at least all my funds are still there but im really worried.
PS: everything happened with my hardwallet unplugged.
TL:DR: Connected my cold wallet to electrum(connected to bitcoind) past week, never to bitcoin-qt, today opened bitcoin-qt and all my history of transactions from my cold wallet(unplugged) was there(bitcoin-qt), is this normal?.
submitted by relgueta to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

weird behavior of electrum

past week installed the new plugin that allow me to connect my electrum wallet to bitcoin-core, i use a hardware wallet and worked like a charm.
Then today was updating the node and used bitcoin-qt instead of bitcoind and when was waiting suddendly i see some text in the gui where it says "recent transactions", and a lot of transactions where there.
Then was like WTF happened here, someone stole my btc?, or installed a compromised version of electrum(i use archlinux and install from the repos). Why some transactions where there, i neved imported my wallet to bitcoin-gui.
Inmediately deleted the wallet.dat and did the same in electrum, but my question is:
Was something imported into bitcoin-qt?, all my history was redeable from the gui, i never imported into bitcoin-qt, and as far i know the seed never leave the hardware wallet.
This is normal?, at least all my funds are still there but im really worried.
PS: everything happened with my hardwallet unplugged.
TL:DR: Connected my cold wallet to electrum(connected to bitcoind) past week, never to bitcoin-qt, today opened bitcoin-qt and all my history of transactions from my cold wallet was there(bitcoin-qt), is this normal?.
submitted by relgueta to Electrum [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

Another one (old wallet recovery)

Hey everyone,
I've been out of the crypto game for a long time, but managed to dig up a wallet that I had stored on an old PC from early 2015. It wouldn't have much in it, maybe a few BTC at most, but it would be nice to recover it and cash out. The machine had Bitcoin Core installed, hasn't been connected to the internet since 2015, and is currently interstate - I've copied wallet.dat and that's all I have access to for now. The wallet is encrypted, backed up, copied to multiple secure locations, etc, and I remember the passphrase, but from what I've read in other threads, the private keys are the important part and I may need to do a "key dump"?
I tried installing Electrum and importing the wallet, but Electrum doesn't recognise the file. Am I right in thinking that the following would be the best solution?
  1. Download and install Bitcoin Core.
  2. Place wallet.dat into the appropriate directory.
  3. Open Bitcoin Core and allow it to "catch up" and download 240 GB worth of blockchain history.
  4. Possibly be forced to input the passphrase to access the wallet again, and transfer BTC out to an exchange of my choosing (unsure if this is how it would work at this stage).
Is there a way to recover the wallet without being forced to download hundreds of GB worth of data? I live in Australia, with typical Australia-tier internet, and it could quite literally take up to a week to download.
Apologies if there's any shortfall of knowledge on my end of things, it's been a long time since I've kept up with crypto and things seem to have changed quite a bit over the last four years. I appreciate any advice, and y'all are welcome to shame me on my relative ignorance, lol. Thanks!
submitted by ChronicLoser to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a Monero Node vs Bitcoin

Edit: warning, rant
Has anyone else had the experience that running/maintaining a Monero node is much easier than Bitcoin? I've been dorking around since July, doing everything in the terminal on a Qubes VM.
Monero comes with simple monerod status and monerod sync_info commands to give you a range of useful info and overview of the current state of your node. Bitcoin has a bunch of individual commands you can aggregate to partially deduce progress, which I have arranged into my own little script. But I didn't find the target block until parsing through the log file. And you have to use other terminal commands like du - ahmd 1 | grep .bitcoin and then run a timer, just to see what your dl speed is, whereas Monero tells you outright. This is important for monitoring your connection over multiple days of download.
I had a hard time finding a BTC wallet that could remotely connect to my own damn node without installing additional software (such as electrum server). I had the silly idea that I could just point a mobile SPV wallet to my own remote node. Hell, the BTC core wallet didn't even have code separation between the node and wallet until just a few months ago.
And now I'm restoring an old Bisq wallet which I only have the seed for. While Bisq was scanning my node, it got hung up at corrupt blk01234.dat file, which actually crashes my Bitcoin node when it receives the data request. So my node had a corruption for 2 months without it knowing, which I only found caz Bisq (I think occurred during a hiccup in transfer from 512GB SD card to SSD).
I tried to drop/replace the blk and rev files, then reindex. But once again, stupid reindex doesnt show progress with any obvious terminal commands. Monitoring disk space, it seemed to be progressing abysmally slow with most my CPU/RAM dedicated to it. I was close to done until a power outage overnight and not enough battery to complete. And even though Bitcoin Core stores everything as individual files, seems it lacks the ability to detect corruption/discard corrupt files and go backwards to the last good file. So I get to start over.
At this point Im actually syncing from scratch in a separate VM while simultaneously reindexing just in case reindex doesnt fix the problem. I give it 50/50.
I know this is kind of a rant. But I wanted to share my experience with some people who can relate or at least understand. It's weird that for a project like Bitcoin, that the core software and UI would be so rudimentary, non-versatile, and even fragile.
Given the ease to configure Monero (including using Qubes qrexec to isolate the wallet in an offline VM), it's straightforward UI and documentation, that it was designed to have separate node and wallet functions, I'm guessing that these problems are much more rare, and easily fixed. That's just an educated wild ass guess of course, since I haven't had any problems.
At any rate, props to the Monero devs for making software that is straightforward and easy to use.
submitted by bawdyanarchist to Monero [link] [comments]

[PLEASE READ] ZClassic > BitcoinPrivate Snapshot/Fork Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) MEGATHREAD 2.0

I’ve been seeing a lot of repeated questions being asked every day so an updated FAQ/Megathread to address all of those questions will be detailed here. If we are missing something, please feel free to let us know and we will add it. We will try to edit this posting as more information becomes available.
Keep in mind the official Bitcoin Private Support portal has now been launched. We have a live chat feature to chat with support, as well as a knowledge base. Please visit the portal at support.btcprivate.org and use the knowledge base’s search function before asking other users.
Snapshot/Fork FAQ
Claiming BTCP Coins
BTCP/ZCL Exchange and Wallet Support
Donations and Contributions program
BTCP Mining
Wallet Troubleshooting
Miscellaneous/BTCP Project Questions
Donate towards the BTCP contribution team, Your donations are 100% voluntary but they are much appreciated!
ZCL: t1gsePJZ6ojJYygj3PWMGJfojPUoMd5AVfU
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LNYzDrUeX6PSecu4sL4eZkuJGaSXnf8GUH
BTCP Related Important Links
For the official list of links from the BTCP Github, refer to the repo.
Just a re-iteration, the BTCP team has launched the support portal offering resources ranging from live support from our teams, as well as a knowledge base that is constantly being updated. https://support.btcprivate.org Again, please feel free to let me know any questions that’s not currently listed above and we will do our best to answer and include it in the megathread.
submitted by BestServerNA to ZClassic [link] [comments]

(Upvote to the top) > SOLUTION FOR ZCLASSIC Eleos Wallet: "Wallet daemon can not be run. Check if daemon does not already run"

So I noticed a lot of people recently (including myself) are experiencing the error "Wallet daemon can not be run. Check if daemon does not already run" when trying to open up their ZCL Eleos wallet, and people are unable to access their funds or cannot export their private keys as well. A solution to this is now official (thanks to JBrutWhat from the BTCP team for helping me out on this.) Note: Post is being edited as more info becomes available to me.
This solution also works for users who are on the ZClassic Swing wallet experiencing the error "A general unexpected critical error has occurred: error: Couldn't connect to server, see the console output for more detailed error information!."
Eleos Wallet Troubleshooting section
ZClassic Electrum Wallet
  1. Create a new standard wallet and restore the 2FA wallet using your "seed" codes. DO NOT password protect this wallet.
  2. Disable the 2FA feature when presented with the option.
  3. Navigate to C:/Users/YOUR-NAME/AppData/Roaming/Electrum-zcl/wallets. Open the new standard wallet file with Notepad.
  4. You will need to gather the 2 private keys and one public key. To find this easily, press “CTRL+F” and search for “xprv”. Copy the 2 “xprv” values as well as the last “xpub” value. You will need these in a later step.
  5. Create a new “Multi-signature wallet”. Select “From 3 co-signers” on the first slider. Select “Require 2 signatures” on the second slider.
  6. To add the first co-signer, click “Use public or private keys”. Enter the first xprv key in this box.
  7. Add the second co-signer via a private key also.
  8. Add the third co-signer with the public key. Complete the set-up.
  9. Your wallet funds now have the ability to be sent from the multi-signature wallet.
For Users who were already using the Electrum wallet beforehand, you can go to file > new/restore wallet > next > import zclassic private keys and input the private key you obtained from the walletaid tool, and it should import the wallet into the electrum wallet. Then from there, go to file > backup wallet and export a copy of the wallet.dat file onto an offline USB.
Reminder: Backup and delete the private keys file from your desktop pc/hard drive, move it into an offline USB for safekeeping. Do not leave it on an online device.
Donate to me if you found the guide useful! Your donations 100% voluntary but they are greatly appreciated and keep us going!
ZCL: t1fkxCWJs3f2oXznGwZuEgftJ2SCjYZ8VjZ
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LhAERgWcjbbXQbGqjhy4owALGhwfpj1aw2
ETH: 0xe723305337926e1fcb5dd0495e6648569a252c13
BCH: 1JXqLHqjYH8bew38AXwEt9dmKvsdYwLtvr
LINKS
(You can join the discord rooms where there are channels for users looking for help)
submitted by BestServerNA to ZClassic [link] [comments]

[PLEASE READ] ZClassic > BitcoinPrivate Snapshot/Fork Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) MEGATHREAD 2.0

I’ve been seeing a lot of repeated questions being asked every day so an updated FAQ/Megathread to address all of those questions will be detailed here. If we are missing something, please feel free to let us know and we will add it. We will try to edit this posting as more information becomes available.
Keep in mind the official Bitcoin Private Support portal has now been launched. We have a live chat feature to chat with support, as well as a knowledge base. Please visit the portal at support.btcprivate.org and use the knowledge base’s search function before asking other users.
Snapshot/Fork FAQ
Claiming BTCP Coins
BTCP/ZCL Exchange and Wallet Support
Donations and Contributions program
BTCP Mining
Wallet Troubleshooting
Miscellaneous/BTCP Project Questions
Donate towards the BTCP contribution team, Your donations are 100% voluntary but they are much appreciated!
ZCL: t1gsePJZ6ojJYygj3PWMGJfojPUoMd5AVfU
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LNYzDrUeX6PSecu4sL4eZkuJGaSXnf8GUH
BTCP Related Important Links
For the official list of links from the BTCP Github, refer to the repo.
Just a re-iteration, the BTCP team has launched the support portal offering resources ranging from live support from our teams, as well as a knowledge base that is constantly being updated. https://support.btcprivate.org Again, please feel free to let me know any questions that’s not currently listed above and we will do our best to answer and include it in the megathread.
submitted by BestServerNA to BitcoinPrivate [link] [comments]

Secure paper wallet tutorial

This is my handout for paranoid people who want a way to store bitcoin safely. It requires a little work, but this is the method I use because it should be resistant to risks associated with:
  1. Bad random number generators
  2. Malicious or flawed software
  3. Hacked computers
If you want a method that is less secure but easier, skip to the bottom of this post.
The Secure Method
  1. Download bitaddress.org. (Try going to the website and pressing "ctrl+s")
  2. Put the bitaddress.org file on a computer with an operating system that has not interacted with the internet much or at all. The computer should not be hooked up to the internet when you do this. You could put the bitaddress file on a USB stick, and then turn off your computer, unplug the internet, and boot it up using a boot-from-CD copy of linux (Ubuntu or Mint for example). This prevents any mal-ware you may have accumulated from running and capturing your keystrokes. I use an old android smart phone that I have done a factory reset on. It has no sim-card and does not have the password to my home wifi. Also the phone wifi is turned off. If you are using a fresh operating system, and do not have a connection to the internet, then your private key will probably not escape the computer.
  3. Roll a die 62 times and write down the sequence of numbers. This gives you 2160 possible outcomes, which is the maximum that Bitcoin supports.
  4. Run bitaddress.org from your offline computer. Input the sequence of numbers from the die rolls into the "Brain Wallet" tab. By providing your own source of randomness, you do not have to worry that the random number generator used by your computer is too weak. I'm looking at you, NSA ಠ_ಠ
  5. Brain Wallet tab creates a private key and address.
  6. Write down the address and private key by hand or print them on a dumb printer. (Dumb printer means not the one at your office with the hard drive. Maybe not the 4 in 1 printer that scans and faxes and makes waffles.) If you hand copy them you may want to hand copy more than one format. (WIF and HEX). If you are crazy and are storing your life savings in Bitcoin, and you hand copy the private key, do a double-check by typing the private key back into the tool on the "Wallet Details" tab and confirm that it recreates the same public address.
  7. Load your paper wallet by sending your bitcoin to the public address. You can do this as many times as you like.
  8. You can view the current balance of your paper wallet by typing the public address into the search box at blockchain.info
  9. If you are using an old cell phone or tablet do a factory reset when you are finished so that the memory of the private keys is destroyed. If you are using a computer with a boot-from-CD copy of linux, I think you can just power down the computer and the private keys will be gone. (Maybe someone can confirm for me that the private keys would not be able to be cached by bitaddress?)
  10. To spend your paper wallet, you will need to either create an offline transaction, or import the private key into a hot wallet. Creating an offline transaction is dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Importing to a client side wallet like Bitcoin-Qt, Electrum, MultiBit or Armory is a good idea. You can also import to an online wallet such as Blockchain.info or Coinbase.
Trusting bitaddress.org
The only thing you need bitaddress.org to do is to honestly convert the brainwallet passphrase into the corresponding private key and address. You can verify that it is doing this honestly by running several test passphrases through the copy of bitaddress that you plan on using, and several other brainwallet generators. For example, you could use the online version of bitaddress, and brainwallet and safepaperwallet and bitcoinpaperwallet. If you are fancy with the linux command line, you can also try "echo -n my_die_rolls | sha256sum". The linux operating system should reply with the same private key that bitaddress makes. This protects you from a malicious paper wallet generator.
Trusting your copy of bitaddress.org
Bitaddress publishes the sha1 hash of the bitaddress.org website at this location:
https://www.bitaddress.org/pgpsignedmsg.txt
The message is signed by the creator, pointbiz. I found his PGP fingerprint here:
https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org/issues/18
"527B 5C82 B1F6 B2DB 72A0 ECBF 8749 7B91 6397 4F5A"
With this fingerprint, you can authenticate the signed message, which gives you the hash of the current bitaddress.org file. Then you can hash your copy of the file and authenticate the file.
I do not have a way to authenticate the fingerprint itself, sorry. According to the website I linked to, git has cryptographic traceability that would enable a person to do some research and authenticate the fingerprint. If you want to go that far, knock yourself out. I think that the techniques described in this document do not really rely on bitaddress being un-corrupt. Anyway, how do we know pointbiz is a good guy? ;-)
There are a lot of skilled eyes watching bitaddress.org and the signed sha1 hash. To gain the most benefit from all of those eyes, it's probably worthwhile to check your copy by hashing it and comparing to the published hash.
"But we aren't supposed to use brainwallets"
You are not supposed to use brainwallets that have predictable passphrases. People think they are pretty clever about how they pick their passphrases, but a lot of bitcoins have been stolen because people tend to come up with similar ideas. If you let dice generate the passphrase, then it is totally random, and you just need to make sure to roll enough times.
How to avoid spending your life rolling dice
When I first started doing this, I rolled a die 62 times for each private key. This is not necessary. You can simply roll the die 62 times and keep the sequence of 62 numbers as a "seed". The first paper address you create would use "my die rolls-1" as the passphrase, the second would be "my die rolls-2" and so on. This is safe because SHA256 prevents any computable relationship between the resulting private key family.
Of course this has a certain bad security scenario -- if anyone obtains the seed they can reconstruct all of your paper wallets. So this is not for everyone! On the other hand, it also means that if you happen to lose one of your paper wallets, you could reconstruct it so long as you still had the seed.
One way to reduce this risk is to add an easy to remember password like this: "my die rolls-password-1".
If you prefer, you can use a technique called diceware to convert your die rolls to words that still contain the same quantity of entropy, but which could be easier to work with. I don't use diceware because it's another piece of software that I have to trust, and I'm just copy/pasting my high entropy seed, so I don't care about how ugly it is.
Why not input the dice as a Base 6 private key on the Wallet Details tab?
Two reasons. First of all, this option requires that you roll the die 99 times, but you do not get meaningful additional protection by rolling more than 62 times. Why roll more times if you don't have to? Second, I use the "high entropy seed" method to generate multiple private keys from the same die rolls. Using the Base 6 option would require rolling 99 times for every private key.
I'm a big nerd with exotic dice. How many times to roll?
Put this formula in Excel to get the number of times to roll: "=160*LOG(2,f)" where f = number of faces on the die. For example, you would roll a d16 40 times. By the way, somewhat unbelievably casino dice are more fair than ordinary dice
The "Change address" problem:
You should understand change addresses because some people have accidentally lost money by not understanding it.
Imagine your paper wallet is a 10 dollar bill. You use it to buy a candy bar. To do this you give the cashier the entire 10 dollar bill. They keep 1 dollar and give you 9 dollars back as change.
With Bitcoin, you have to explicitly say that you want 9 dollars back, and you have to provide an address where it should go to. If you just hand over the 10 dollar bill, and don't say you want 9 dollars back, then the miner who processes the transaction gives 1 dollar to the store and keeps the remainder themselves.
Wallet software like Bitcoin-Qt handles this automatically for you. They automatically make "change addresses" and they automatically construct transactions that make the change go to the change address.
There are three ways I know of that the change problem can bite you:
  1. You generate a raw transaction by hand, and screw up. If you are generating a transaction "by hand" with a raw transaction editor, you need to be extra careful that your outputs add up to the same number as your inputs. Otherwise, the very lucky miner who puts your transaction in a block will keep the difference.
  2. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the paper wallet. The change is not in the paper wallet. It is in a change address that the wallet software generated. That means that if you lose your wallet.dat file you will lose all the change. The paper wallet is empty.
  3. You import a paper wallet into a wallet software and spend part of it, and then think that the change is in the change address that the wallet software generated. If the transaction did not need to consume all of the "outputs" used to fund the paper wallet, then there could be some unspent outputs still located at the address of the paper wallet. If you destroyed the paper wallet, and destroyed the copy of the private key imported to the wallet software, then you could not access this money. (E.g. if you restored the software wallet from its seed, thinking all of the money was moved to the wallet-generated change addresses.)
For more on this, see here
The hot paper wallet problem
Your bitcoin in your paper wallet are secure, so long as the piece of paper is secure, until you go to spend it. When you spend it, you put the private key onto a computer that is connected to the internet. At this point you must regard your paper wallet address as hot because the computer you used may have been compromised. It now provides much less protection against theft of your coins. If you need the level of protection that a cold paper wallet provides, you need to create a new one and send your coins to it.
Destroying your paper wallet address
Do not destroy the only copy of a private key without verifying that there is no money at that address. Your client may have sent change to your paper wallet address without you realizing it. Your client may have not consumed all of the unspent outputs available at the paper wallet address. You can go to blockchain.info and type the public address into the search window to see the current balance. I don't bother destroying my used/empty paper wallet addresses. I just file them away.
Encrypting your private key
BIP 0038 describes a standardized way to encrypt your paper wallet private key. A normal paper wallet is vulnerable because if anyone sees the private key they can take the coins. The BIP38 protocol is even resistant to brute force attacks because it uses a memory intensive encryption algorithm called scrypt. If you want to encrypt your wallets using BIP38, I recommend that you use bitcoinpaperwallet because they will let you type in your own private key and will encrypt it for you. As with bitaddress, for high security you should only use a local copy of this website on a computer that will never get connected to the internet.
Splitting your private key
Another option for protecting the private key is to convert it into multiple fragments that must be brought together. This method allows you to store pieces of your key with separate people in separate locations. It can be set up so that you can reconstitute the private key when you have any 2 out of the 3 fragments. This technique is called Shamir's Secret Sharing. I have not tried this technique, but you may find it valuable. You could try using this website http://passguardian.com/ which will help you split up a key. As before, you should do this on an offline computer. Keep in mind if you use this service that you are trusting it to work properly. It would be good to find other independently created tools that could be used to validate the operation of passguardian. Personally, I would be nervous destroying the only copy of a private key and relying entirely on the fragments generated by the website.
Looks like Bitaddress has an implementation of Shamir's Secret Sharing now under the "Split Wallet" tab. However it would appear that you cannot provide your own key for this, so you would have to trust bitaddress.
Durable Media
Pay attention to the media you use to record your paper wallet. Some kinds of ink fade, some kinds of paper disintegrate. Moisture and heat are your enemies.
In addition to keeping copies of my paper wallet addresses I did the following:
  1. Order a set of numeric metal stamps. ($10)
  2. Buy a square galvanized steel outlet cover from the hardware store ($1)
  3. Buy a sledgehammer from the hardware store
  4. Write the die rolls on the steel plate using a sharpie
  5. Use the hammer to stamp the metal. Do all the 1's, then all the 2's etc. Please use eye protection, as metal stamp may emit sparks or fly unexpectedly across the garage. :-)
  6. Use nail polish remover to erase the sharpie
Electrum
If you trust electrum you might try running it on an offline computer, and having it generate a series of private keys from a seed. I don't have experience with this software, but it sounds like there are some slick possibilities there that could save you time if you are working with a lot of addresses.
Message to the downvoters
I would appreciate it if you would comment, so that I can learn from your opinion. Thanks!
The Easy Method
This method is probably suitable for small quantities of bitcoin. I would not trust it for life-altering sums of money.
  1. Download the bitaddress.org website to your hard drive.
  2. Close your browser
  3. Disconnect from the internet
  4. Open the bitaddress.org website from your hard drive.
  5. Print a paper wallet on your printer
  6. Close your browser
submitted by moral_agent to BitcoinWallet [link] [comments]

My conversion failed and I might have lost 20 BCH somehow

I bought BTC a long time ago and it's lived in a Bitcoin Core wallet.dat file. My read on how to fork properly was to wait until the fork happened, then transfer all my original BTC to a new wallet (which I did by sending a handful of transactions to an Electrum wallet), then after the post-fork BTC was safely associated with a new keypair in a different wallet, and Bitcoin Core showed 0 BTC, that I could use the private keys in that wallet and "Sweep" them with the BCH Electron Wallet. I had 5 Bitcoin Core private keys and swept each into Electron Client. Only one of the Bitcoin Core private keys had anything on it, 50 mBCH, which means I'm missing the VAST majority of my BCH somehow.
I'm currently building a new isolated VM to install Bitcoin ABC on, but the block chain will take about a day to sync, so I'm kind of frantic about there being a missing ~$30k worth of BCH that may or may not still exist while I wait to import an old pre-fork copy of the Bitcoin Core wallet.dat.
Does anyone have any similar experience with moving forward on the fork and running into this problem?
As you can imagine I'm kind of distraught right now until I figure out what the heck happened.
Thanks!
submitted by nacho1234567 to btc [link] [comments]

How do you import a Bitcoin Core (QT)-made wallet.dat file into another wallet?

So I have a wallet.dat made a while ago and wanted to check what was in it, problem is it was made in the bitcoin core QT client, which I can't even load up because it occasionally freezes and usually won't even sync up, at an absurdly slow rate.
When I replace that wallet file into the default data directory, and start bitcoin-qt.exe with the -rescan command, it just starts but no addresses show up in my wallet file and i noticed the wallet.dat file size changes when the bitcoin core client starts up, seemingly modifying something to make it slightly bigger, don't know why.
How do I check this wallet.dat? I tried importing it into the latest electrum 3.2.3 wallet and it won't accept it.
submitted by BestServerNA to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Recovering unencrypted wallet from 2013

EDIT: I've been able to export my details from Bitcoin Core into a format I recognise, with addresses marked with dates corresponding to the last time I was doing transactions. Now to see which ones have any money in them!
Hi all,
So after seeing the price of Bitcoin I immediately thought back to my wallets. I backed them up years ago. But they will not import into any modern wallet software (some just hard crash.) The software I last used with these wallets was Bitcoin QT.
I was able to extract a .json file from this backed up wallet.dat using pywallet, but I have no idea what to do with the resulting data. I read about Electrum having a "Sweep private keys" function, and about using Bitcoin QT to dump private key information. But since no receive addresses are showing up in these old versions, I have no idea what to dump. I tried my best at importing the private keys from this data after matching one private key to some Bitcoin QT output, and put all my private keys into the sweep. However, it says nothing was found and my balance remains at nothing.
I cannot find what my old BTC address was, so I'm unable to check if the funds are still there in the wallet.
Is anyone able to give me some steps on how to get this loaded into a modern wallet? Nothing I've tried so far works.
submitted by DaedalusRaistlin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to convert 65 char private key to WIF compressed 52 char base 58?

I recently used a utility to search my old HD's for private keys. It worked well. The utility (https://www.makomk.com/gitweb/?p=bitcoin-wallet-recover.git) spit out a list of 209 public and private keys, for example (not real numbers)
$ sudo ./wallet-recover /dev/sdg recovered-wallet.dat pubkey_comp = 0297699ca958ada8e31cfc180b46a8b5db95dfbed9d16d4ca82ad2265dc0e97d26 privkey = de0f5a37ba4b69096385b00655f7f2d55bc114c3051993f24d2d46926ca05ad8 
So, I now have these private keys, and supposedly they are also in recovery_wallet.dat. However, the old bitcoin client (v0.7.0) seems to only recognize one address and using "importprivkey" in the console reports an error when I try to manually import these private keys.
These found keys are valid, as I am able to test them in https://www.bitaddress.org and then test the resulting address in blockchain.info.
These keys seem to be ASCII string of hexadecimal of the 256-bit ECDSA private key.
My problem is, I need to now convert these 64 character private keys to something I can import, like the WIF format.
I have this little script to convert to base58check
#!/bin/bash export PRIV_KEY=${1} export VER=ef echo ${VER}${PRIV_KEY} -n | xxd -r -p | openssl dgst -sha256 -binary | openssl dgst -sha256 > tmp export R=`cat tmp|awk '{print $2}'` echo ${R} | perl -p -e 's/^(........).*/$1/gmi' > tmp export CHECKSUM=`cat tmp` export PRE=`echo ${VER}${PRIV_KEY}${CHECKSUM}` echo ${PRE} 
This script tests ok when comparing to https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1801519.0
The output number is in a WIF format, but, when I go to Electrum and create a new wallet with "import private keys", Electrum does not recognize the number :/
I can't seem to create any number from the private keys that can be imported. What DOES work is if I go to http://bitaddress.org, enter the private key, then cut the new "Private Key WIF Compressed 52 characters base58" they make...
So, the question is... HOW DO I MAKE A "PRIVATE KEY WIF COMPRESSED 52 CHAR BASE 58" STRING FROM THE PRIVATE KEY THE SCRAPPER FOUND?
I know I can cut and paste hundreds, thousands, of private keys into bitaddress.org, but I hoping someone here knows how to do it programmatically, like, a utility or an algo or something.
Thanks
submitted by duncan_stroud to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Please help! Bitcoin problems caused by outdated wallet.

Hello reddit, I've got quite the dilemma on my hands.. I could definitely use all the help I could get. To explain my situation: Back in 2011 I created a bitcoin wallet on a thumbdrive, so it could be portable and just in case my laptop died (it did, by the way). I have just found this thumbdrive and therefore the bitcoin wallet on it. The wallet was from the beta release version (not sure the exact version). My issue is that first I was able to click Launch.bat and my wallet would start but then would give me an error saying that my bitcoin.conf file needed to contain "rpcpassword=". I changed this and didn't have any luck. I then copied over my bitcoin folder containing my wallet onto my current laptop. From here, I'm not completely sure where I went wrong so I will list everything I did: Downloaded Bitcoin Core Downloaded Electrum Clicked the "Bitcoin.exe" in the file I copied over to my laptop (I think this is causing the issues). I also changed the name of my thumbdrive from "CNA(H:) to "Removable Disk(H:)" but then switched it back again.
Now, when I go to start the wallet (using launch.bat) in my thumbdrive, I see the MS-DOS screen pop up quickly and leave. When I run launch.bat as an administrator it says "Windows cannot find C:\'Windows\System32\APP\bitcoin.exe'. Make sure you typed the name correctly and try again." I find this odd, because it should be referencing my thumbdrive, shouldn't it?
Along with this error, I am unable to start up Bitcoin Core, the error I get with that is ""Cannot obtain a lock on data directory C:Users\npardy\AppData\Roaming\Bitcoin. Bitcoin Core is probable already running."
Preferably, I just want an easy way to import my wallet.dat file into another type of wallet which will just allow me to access my bitcoin.
Thank you to anyone who can help with this!
submitted by npardy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Old bitcoin core wallet to Electrum

Im opening up a bitcoin core wallet from 2014 on an old MacBook and its syncing the blockchain. This will take me months to sync so I need to import the .dat file into Electrum. What is the safest way to do this?
submitted by Prozper to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Guidance please on how to import .dat file in BTC core 0.16.0

Hi guys!
Backstory:
My old friend, somehow bought BTC before the mtgox hack, somewhere in 2013 probably. In fact he doesn't really remember. He gave me his MacBook, from which I've extracted the wallet.dat file, and made a couple of backups of said file.
Specs: Windows 10, x64 install of BTC core, have not fully synced the blockchain as of yet.
My current problem:
I've tried following this really helpfull guide, but I'm getting stuck since I cant find the datadir file to replace the wallet.dat file. (please note that I've installed the program files as well as the blockchain location on my secondary drive because that has enough space for the blockchain, and am currently trying again with program data in C, blockchain data in D).
My anticipated problem:
He has a guess about the passphrase its something in the format of 'vaalkeo12' or something. After I've exhausted the most logical combinations is there still a (semi-noobfriendly way to crack the passphrase)?
Assuming this goes well I'd then dumpwallet for a human readable version of the private key, said private key I could then import into for example electrum wallet, and then send the files to a new wallet, and make a paper wallet/usb stick backup of it.
To summarize my questions: - How do I replace the BTC Core wallet.dat if I cant find the datadir? (bitcoin.it's guide says you can choose a datadir by rightclicking the exe under properties but I see no such option? - If I cant find the right passhprase any reccomended course of action? - Once I have the private key, which client do you recommend me to import it in? - Any other pointers or things I should anticipate?
Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Sorry for spelling/grammar, throwaway for privacy reasons!
Thank you for reading.
submitted by discardez to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[PLEASE READ] ZClassic –> BitcoinPrivate Snapshot/Fork Frequently Asked Questions MEGATHREAD 2.0

I’ve been seeing a lot of repeated questions being asked every day so an updated FAQ/Megathread to address all of those questions will be detailed here. If we are missing something, please feel free to let us know and we will add it. We will try to edit this posting as more information becomes available.
Keep in mind the official BitcoinPrivate Support portal has now been launched. We have a live chat feature to chat with support, as well as a knowledge base. Please visit the portal at support.btcprivate.org and use the knowledge base’s search function before asking other users.
Snapshot/Fork FAQ
Claiming BTCP Coins
BTCP/ZCL Exchange and Wallet Support
Donations and Contributions program
BTCP Mining
Wallet Troubleshooting
Miscellaneous/BTCP Project Questions
Donate to the contribution team:
ZCL: t1gsePJZ6ojJYygj3PWMGJfojPUoMd5AVfU
BTC: 1CqSD9rxdQnKEwzqqbLwpgwCeQikFCifPj
LTC: LNYzDrUeX6PSecu4sL4eZkuJGaSXnf8GUH
BCH: 1MxJteinBWHMUibDxADujrgzXfX1LeVZKN
BTCP Related Important Links
For the official list of links from the BTCP Github, refer to the repo.
Again, please feel free to let me know any questions that’s not currently listed above and we will do our best to answer and include it in the megathread.
submitted by BestServerNA to u/BestServerNA [link] [comments]

How do I access the funds in a file called "money.bit"

I've been bitcoining for a few years, and have an old file I've been meaning to try and access for a couple of years.
It begins:
{"privateKey":"{\"iv\":\"lettersnumberssymbols",\"v\":1,\"iter\":10000,\"ks\":128,\"ts\":64,\"mode\":\"ccm\",\"adata\":\"\",\"cipher\":\"aes\",\"salt\":\"lettersnumberssymbols",\"ct\":\"lettersnumberssymbols/alphanumeric/E\"}","encryption":"sjcl"}
I've replaced the bits I believe are sensitive.
I can't remember which program this file is designed to work with. I've tried loading one of the alphanumeric as a private key, but one of the attributes is salt, and I don't think it's quite as simple as just reading it as a text file and cutting and pasting one of the strings into the import private key feature on blockchain.info.
It's a .bit file rather than a .dat or something else... unless I renamed it at some point to end .bit, to remind myself what it was, which is quite possible - it may have begun life with no file extension (I'm a Linux user).
I've already tried the contents with electrum, and I've used quite a few wallets in the past so I've been poking around bread, electrum, mycelium, and can't quite see how this wallet would fit with any of those. I've used (well, installed) armory, multibit, as well as used things like online wallet generators.
So I'm a bit stuck as to what to do, hoping someone recognizes this format!
submitted by regojr9 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Introduction to Bitcoin: How to send and receive Bitcoin ... HOW TO import, export, sweep private keys from and to the HODLER Wallet 10. How to Setup COLDCARD Air-Gap Multisig Wallet and use with Electrum How to import a cryptocurrency paper wallet - YouTube How to restore a Bitcoin wallet

(To see more about creating paper wallets, read my previous post called "Creating a Bitcoin paper wallet for cold storage.") I'm confidant the paper wallet contains the funds because I pasted that 12WwoV… address into blockchain.info, and can see the "Final Balance" – see below. The overall process is to import the private key into Electrum, then send the complete contents of the paper ... Import your Bitcoin Wallet into Electrum. Electrum is a powerful open-source Bitcoin wallet with a plethora of features that allow you to get the most out of your Bitcoin. In this article, you'll learn how to get access to your Exodus BTC funds using Electrum. I am fairly new to Bitcoin, but one year ago, I made a Bitcoin address on Bitcoin-Qt, but I stopped using it, because the whole database downloading took so much space on my disk. I have my wallet.dat file, but I don't know, where can I use it. I tried Electrum, but it seems that the wallet.dat import doesn't work there. In bitcoin core open the debug console and use the dumpwallet command to dump your wallet in WIF format. You should then be able to import the WIF private keys into Electrum. Create a new Electrum wallet, select "Import Bitcoin addresses or private keys", convert your keys according to the rules available by clicking on "Info" button (you may not need to convert if your wallet.dat is quite old) and you're good to go! The above is tested on Bitcoin Core 0.20.1 and Electrum 4.0.2.

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Introduction to Bitcoin: How to send and receive Bitcoin ...

How to Import & Use Paper Wallets for Beginners - Duration: ... Fix Verge Electrum Wallet Network Issue - Duration: 4:44. maxjac 7,808 views. 4:44. BitShares Tutorials - How-to set up a Wallet ... Brian shows how to import a paper wallet he got from https://getcryptocrate.com/ and explains why private keys matter and why you should think twice about ho... This screencast demonstrates how to send and receive Bitcoin using Electrum wallet. -Electrum wallet's website: https://electrum.org -Reach us through: - Hod... How to Restore a Bitcoin Wallet from a Seed (Electrum ... Bitcoin How to import your old wallet into new one tutorial works 100% Recovered 1.7 BTC - Duration: 8:26. XOOMdotWS 10,023 views. 8:26 ... How to import your bitcoin segwit paper wallet into Electrum with bech32 or P2SH addresses. In this video I discuss the new bech32 address feature hidden in segwitaddress.org and how you can ...

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