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Is Crypto Currency truly at risk due to Quantum Computers, and what can you do about it?

Is Crypto Currency truly at risk due to Quantum Computers, and what can you do about it?

There is no denying that the Quantum revolution is coming. Security protocols for the internet, banking, telecommunications, etc... are all at risk, and your Bitcoins (and alt-cryptos) are next!
This article is not really about quantum computers[i], but, rather, how they will affect the future of cryptocurrency, and what steps a smart investor will take. Since this is a complicated subject, my intention is to provide just enough relevant information without being too “techy.”

The Quantum Evolution

In 1982, Nobel winning physicist, Richard Feynman, hypothesized how quantum computers[ii] would be used in modern life.
Just one year later, Apple released the “Apple Lisa”[iii] – a home computer with a 7.89MHz processor and a whopping 5MB hard drive, and, if you enjoy nostalgia, it used 5.25in floppy disks.
Today, we walk around with portable devices that are thousands of times more powerful, and, yet, our modern day computers still work in a simple manner, with simple math, and simple operators[iv]. They now just do it so fast and efficient that we forget what’s happening behind the scenes.
No doubt, the human race is accelerating at a remarkable speed, and we’ve become obsessed with quantifying everything - from the everyday details of life to the entire universe[v]. Not only do we know how to precisely measure elementary particles, we also know how to control their actions!
Yet, even with all this advancement, modern computers cannot “crack” cryptocurrencies without the use of a great deal more computing power, and since it’s more than the planet can currently supply, it could take millions, if not billions, of years.
However, what current computers can’t do, quantum computers can!
So, how can something that was conceptualized in the 1980’s, and, as of yet, has no practical application, compromise cryptocurrencies and take over Bitcoin?
To best answer this question, let’s begin by looking at a bitcoin address.

What exactly is a Bitcoin address?

Well, in layman terms, a Bitcoin address is used to send and receive Bitcoins, and looking a bit closer (excuse the pun), it has two parts:[vi]
A public key that is openly shared with the world to accept payments. A public key that is derived from the private key. The private key is made up of 256 bits of information in a (hopefully) random order. This 256 bit code is 64 characters long (in the range of 0-9/a-f) and further compressed into a 52 character code (using RIPEMD-160).
NOTE: Although many people talk about Bitcoin encryption, Bitcoin does not use Encryption. Instead, Bitcoin uses a hashing algorithm (for more info, please see endnote below[vii]).
Now, back to understanding the private key:
The Bitcoin address “1EHNa6Q4Jz2uvNExL497mE43ikXhwF6kZm” translates to a private key of “5HpHagT65TZzG1PH3CSu63k8DbpvD8s5ip4nEB3kEsreAnchuDf” which further translates to a 256 bit private key of “0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001” (this should go without saying, but do not use this address/private key because it was compromised long ago.) Although there are a few more calculations that go behind the scenes, these are the most relevant details.
Now, to access a Bitcoin address, you first need the private key, and from this private key, the public key is derived. With current computers, it’s classically impractical to attempt to find a private key based on a public key. Simply put, you need the private key to know the public key.
However, it has already been theorized (and technically proven) that due to private key compression, multiple private keys can be used to access the same public key (aka address). This means that your Bitcoin address has multiple private keys associated with it, and, if someone accidentally discovers or “cracks” any one of those private keys, they have access to all the funds in that specific address.
There is even a pool of a few dedicated people hunting for these potential overlaps[viii], and they are, in fact, getting very efficient at it. The creator of the pool also has a website listing every possible Bitcoin private key/address in existence[ix], and, as of this writing, the pool averages 204 trillion keys per day!
But wait! Before you get scared and start panic selling, the probability of finding a Bitcoin address containing funds (or even being used) is highly unlikely – nevertheless, still possible!
However, the more Bitcoin users, the more likely a “collision” (finding overlapping private/public key pairs)! You see, the security of a Bitcoin address is simply based on large numbers! How large? Well, according to my math, 1.157920892373x1077 potential private keys exist (that number represents over 9,500 digits in length! For some perspective, this entire article contains just over 14,000 characters. Therefore, the total number of Bitcoin addresses is so great that the probability of finding an active address with funds is infinitesimal.

So, how do Quantum Computers present a threat?

At this point, you might be thinking, “How can a quantum computer defeat this overwhelming number of possibilities?” Well, to put it simple; Superposition and Entanglement[x].
Superposition allows a quantum bit (qbit) to be in multiple states at the same time. Entanglement allows an observer to know the measurement of a particle in any location in the universe. If you have ever heard Einstein’s quote, “Spooky Action at a Distance,” he was talking about Entanglement!
To give you an idea of how this works, imagine how efficient you would be if you could make your coffee, drive your car, and walk your dog all at the same time, while also knowing the temperature of your coffee before drinking, the current maintenance requirements for your car, and even what your dog is thinking! In a nutshell, quantum computers have the ability to process and analyze countless bits of information simultaneously – and so fast, and in such a different way, that no human mind can comprehend!
At this stage, it is estimated that the Bitcoin address hash algorithm will be defeated by quantum computers before 2028 (and quite possibly much sooner)! The NSA has even stated that the SHA256 hash algorithm (the same hash algorithm that Bitcoin uses) is no longer considered secure, and, as a result, the NSA has now moved to new hashing techniques, and that was in 2016! Prior to that, in 2014, the NSA also invested a large amount of money in a research program called “Penetrating Hard Targets project”[xi] which was used for further Quantum Computer study and how to break “strong encryption and hashing algorithms.” Does NSA know something they’re not saying or are they just preemptively preparing?
Nonetheless, before long, we will be in a post-quantum cryptography world where quantum computers can crack crypto addresses and take all the funds in any wallet.

What are Bitcoin core developers doing about this threat?

Well, as of now, absolutely nothing. Quantum computers are not considered a threat by Bitcoin developers nor by most of the crypto-community. I’m sure when the time comes, Bitcoin core developers will implement a new cryptographic algorithm that all future addresses/transactions will utilize. However, will this happen before post-quantum cryptography[xii]?
Moreover, even after new cryptographic implementation, what about all the old addresses? Well, if your address has been actively used on the network (sending funds), it will be in imminent danger of a quantum attack. Therefore, everyone who is holding funds in an old address will need to send their funds to a new address (using a quantum safe crypto-format). If you think network congestion is a problem now, just wait…
Additionally, there is the potential that the transition to a new hashing algorithm will require a hard fork (a soft fork may also suffice), and this could result in a serious problem because there should not be multiple copies of the same blockchain/ledger. If one fork gets attacked, the address on the other fork is also compromised. As a side-note, the blockchain Nebulas[xiii] will have the ability to modify the base blockchain software without any forks. This includes adding new and more secure hashing algorithms over time! Nebulas is due to be released in 2018.

Who would want to attack Bitcoin?

Bitcoin and cryptocurrency represent a threat to the controlling financial system of our modern economy. Entire countries have outright banned cryptocurrency[xiv] and even arrested people[xv], and while discrediting it, some countries are copying cryptocurrency to use (and control) in their economy[xvi]!
Furthermore, Visa[xvii], Mastercard[xviii], Discover[xix], and most banks act like they want nothing to do with cryptocurrency, all the while seeing the potential of blockchain technology and developing their own[xx]. Just like any disruptive technology, Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies have their fair share of enemies!
As of now, quantum computers are being developed by some of the largest companies in the world, as well as private government agencies.
No doubt, we will see a post-quantum cryptography world sooner than most realize. By that point, who knows how long “3 letter agencies” will have been using quantum technology - and what they’ll be capable of!

What can we do to protect ourselves today?

Of course, the best option is to start looking at how Bitcoin can implement new cryptographic features immediately, but it will take time, and we have seen how slow the process can be just for scaling[xxi].
The other thing we can do is use a Bitcoin address only once for outgoing transactions. When quantum computers attack Bitcoin (and other crypto currencies), their first target will be addresses that have outgoing transactions on the blockchain that contain funds.
This is due to the fact that when computers first attempt to crack a Bitcoin address, the starting point is when a transaction becomes public. In other words, when the transaction is first signed – a signed transaction is a digital signature derived from the private key, and it validates the transaction on the network. Compared to classical computers, quantum computers can exponentially extrapolate this information.
Initially, Bitcoin Core Software might provide some level of protection because it only uses an address once, and then sends the remaining balance (if any) to another address in your keypool. However, third party Bitcoin wallets can and do use an address multiple times for outgoing transactions. For instance, this could be a big problem for users that accept donations (if they don’t update their donation address every time they remove funds). The biggest downside to Bitcoin Core Software is the amount of hard-drive space required, as well as diligently retaining an up-to-date copy of the entire blockchain ledger.
Nonetheless, as quantum computers evolve, they will inevitably render SHA256 vulnerable, and although this will be one of the first hash algorithms cracked by quantum computers, it won’t be the last!

Are any cryptocurrencies planning for the post-quantum cryptography world?

Yes, indeed, there are! Here is a short list of ones you may want to know more about:

Full disclosure:

Although I am in no way associated with any project listed above, I do hold coins in all as well as Bitcoin, Litecoin and many others.
The thoughts above are based on my personal research, but I make no claims to being a quantum scientist or cryptographer. So, don’t take my word for anything. Instead, do your own research and draw your own conclusions. I’ve included many references below, but there are many more to explore.
In conclusion, the intention of this article is not to create fear or panic, nor any other negative effects. It is simply to educate. If you see an error in any of my statements, please, politely, let me know, and I will do my best to update the error.
Thanks for reading!

References

[i] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhHMJCUmq28 – A great video explaining quantum computers.
[ii] https://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~nd/surprise_97/journal/vol4/spb3/ - A brief history of quantum computing.
[iii] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Lisa - More than you would ever want to know about the Apple Lisa.
[iv] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpIctyqH29Q&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtNlUrzyH5r6jN9ulIgZBpdo - Want to learn more about computer science? Here is a great crash course for it!
[v] https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/quantify - What does quantify mean?
[vi] https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Private_key - More info about Bitcoin private keys.
[vii] https://www.securityinnovationeurope.com/blog/page/whats-the-difference-between-hashing-and-encrypting - A good example of the deference between Hash and Encryption
[viii] https://lbc.cryptoguru.org/stats - The Large Bitcoin Collider.
[ix] http://directory.io/ - A list of every possible Bitcoin private key. This website is a clever way of converting the 64 character uncompressed key to the private key 128 at a time. Since it is impossible to save all this data in a database and search, it is not considered a threat! It’s equated with looking for a single needle on the entire planet.
[x] https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-quantum-computing/quantum-computing-101#Superposition-and-entanglement – Brief overview of Superposition and Entanglement.
[xi] https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/nsa-seeks-to-build-quantum-computer-that-could-crack-most-types-of-encryption/2014/01/02/8fff297e-7195-11e3-8def-a33011492df2_story.html?utm_term=.e05a9dfb6333 – A review of the Penetrating Hard Targets project.
[xii] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-quantum_cryptography - Explains post-quantum cryptography.
[xiii] https://www.nebulas.io/ - The nebulas project has some amazing technology planned in their roadmap. They are currently in testnet stage with initial launch expected taking place in a few weeks. If you don’t know about Nebulas, you should check them out. [xiv] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory - Country’s stance on crypto currencies.
[xv] https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/30/venezuela-is-one-of-the-worlds-most-dangerous-places-to-mine-bitcoin.html - Don’t be a miner in Venezuela!
[xvi] http://www.newsweek.com/russia-bitcoin-avoid-us-sanctions-cryptocurrency-768742 - Russia’s plan for their own crypto currency.
[xvii] http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2018/01/05/visa-locks-bitcoin-payment-cards-crackdown-card-issue - Recent attack from visa against crypto currency.
[xviii] https://www.ccn.com/non-government-digital-currency-junk-says-mastercard-ceo-rejecting-bitcoin/ - Mastercards position about Bitcoin.
[xix] http://www.livebitcoinnews.com/discover-joins-visa-mastercard-barring-bitcoin-support/ - Discovers position about Bitcoin.
[xx] http://fortune.com/2017/10/20/mastercard-blockchain-bitcoin/ - Mastercard is making their own blockchain.
[xxi] https://bitcoincore.org/en/2015/12/21/capacity-increase/ - News about Bitcoin capacity. Not a lot of news…
[xxii] https://learn.iota.org/faq/what-makes-iota-quantum-secure - IOTA and quantum encryption.
[xxiii] https://eprint.iacr.org/2011/191.pdf - The whitepaper of Winternitz One-Time Signature Scheme
[xxiv] https://cardanoroadmap.com/ - The Cardano project roadmap.
[xxv] https://eprint.iacr.org/2017/490 - More about the BLISS hash system.
[xxvi] https://www.ethereum.org/ - Home of the Ethereum project.
[xxvii] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-3#Security_against_quantum_attacks – SHA3 hash algorithm vs quantum computers.
[xxviii] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamport_signature - Lamport signature information.
[xxix] https://theqrl.org/ - Home of the Quantum Resistant Ledger project.
submitted by satoshibytes to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Quantum splice attack on hashes?

So, if I were able to manipulate a block such that the hash matched a hash of another existing block, would that enable me to create a new chain that had blocks spliced into it at some point?
Sha-1 has been cracked. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/02/23/google_first_sha1_collision/
A whitepaper for using quantum computers to crack sha-3 is here: https://eprint.iacr.org/2020/213.pdf
We are at sha-256.
What would the consequences of a quantum splice attack look like? Well, for starters, the attackers could not submit any invalid transactions. It would be rejected as an invalid block. Could they mess transaction ordering? Maybe. Remember these are deep in the past. The biggest impact would be that the attacker might be able to control who earned the bitcoins mined at that point. This would invalidate transactions in the present because the initial miner got swapped. This would create all kinds of chaos as blocks became invalid.
The bigger question is how bitcoin would recover. We would recover, no doubts there. The question of how we recover is an important one. Bitcoin probably would need governance in this scenario. Miners, holders, and node runners would both need to have additional channels of communication to the ones they have now.
submitted by Ghostcarapace3 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

TKEY mining explained. Part 2

TKEY mining explained. Part 2

https://preview.redd.it/2erlvx29qer21.png?width=1500&format=png&auto=webp&s=1e387b209ea03d4b77c74a0e82feeea4324c3d4b


Dear Investors!

We have already announced the official Tkeycoin network release date - April 5, 2019. The days are passing by and the release date is getting closer, meaning it’s high time to talk about the mining of TKEY cryptocurrency.

The first publication on the subject is already available on our Facebook page (just in case you missed it). We talked about the PoW algorithm, Bitcoin mining history and mining hardware evolution, Tkeycoin mining features etc. The article was really informative, and we recommend you to read (or re-read) it before you start the second part.

Today we will talk about some mining issues that we haven’t yet mentioned. Let’s start with SHA-256 algorithm, as it will be also used for Tkeycoin mining. It stands for Secure Hashing Algorithm, developed by The US National Security Service. The main advantage of this algorithm is its ability to efficiently compress data and the zero probability of collisions. In simple words, SHA-256 is safe, quick and universal.

According to the US law, SHA-256 may be used by both individuals and commercial organizations. It is not surprising that SHA-256 was applied to cryptocurrencies - this algorithm allows to encrypt any amount of data, converting it into a compact line of cryptographic hash. It is very important for mining, as miners can encrypt all the transactions in one block, producing an output hash value of the fixed size. When miners manage to find the right hash, the block is considered solved and is added to the blockchain. This is exactly how cryptocurrencies are mined.

As the process is actually based on random guessing, miners with more computing power are the first to find the right hash. As we have already mentioned, SHA-256-based mining is possible with CPUs, GPUs and ASICs. And if the first 2 options (processors and video cards respectively) are familiar to everyone, the third one may be confusing both for beginners and experienced miners.

ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) is a type of hardware customized for a specific computer task. ASIC miners are suitable only for cryptocurrency mining. They use the circuits specifically created for efficient solving of hash puzzles. Even ASIC physical design meets the basic needs of mining - for example, they normally have very efficient cooling systems.

ASICs pay off pretty quickly, feature less energy consumption (compared with GPU analogs) and bigger hashrates. Also, as we have already said, they are provided with better cooling systems. Naturally, this type of mining hardware has its drawbacks, too. For instance, you can only use it for mining one or several cryptocurrencies, based on a certain algorithm. Besides, ASICs are fast to become obsolete. But, despite all this, they are normally a profitable investment.

To mine Tkeycoin you may use a wide variety of ASICs by Bitmain (Antminer S9, S11, T15), DragonMint T1, Ebang Communication, WhatsMiner M3 etc. It’s important to note that you will also be able to mine TKEY cryptocurrency with already ‘obsolete’ hardware, because in our case the network difficulty will be comparable with the early stages of Bitcoin existence. We will publish more details and numbers soon, after we have tested the network and made the preliminary calculations.

Anyway, you still have enough time for choosing your mining hardware, as ASIC and GPU mining will be unavailable during the first month of the network existence. Our team will need a certain amount of time for public network testing and tuning. Until this process is over, it will only be possible to mine Tkeycoin using PCs, laptops and smartphones.

As soon as we have completed all the necessary tests and stabilized the mining process, all the users will become able to mine the coins with ASICs, cloud-mining services, and GPU rigs - whatever option they prefer or can afford. For your convenience, we will also release a special mining profitability calculator that will help you choose the perfect hardware for your needs, resources and desired profit level. Until then you may use for this purpose any of the dozens calculators already available online.

About mining pools. As we mentioned earlier, we will start an official Tkeycoin mining pool that will let TKEY miners unite their computing powers. Besides, we plan to publish the source code, thus allowing thousands of enthusiasts worldwide to create their own pools for Tkeycoin mining.

In conclusion, there will be no limits for Tkeycoin mining. So far, we have received a lot of questions concerning this issue. No, there will not be any limits (like 3000 coins or whatever). Tkeycoin mining will be available for anyone, we mean it.

Don’t forget to subscribe to our social media pages and follow the news of the project. Soon, we will come up to you with some tech specs and more related details, including the size of reward for solving a block.
Check your news feed regularly not to miss anything!

See you soon!
Your Tkeycoin Team
submitted by tkeycoin to u/tkeycoin [link] [comments]

Debunked: "We don't know what Satoshis opinion was on big blocks or exactly how he expected the Bitcoin design to scale past VISA levels and be usable as money for the entire world"

If the final edition of the design paper itself was not enough to convince you of how Bitcoin is designed to scale, here are Satoshis own less formal explanations.
Satoshi:
Long before the network gets anywhere near as large as that, it would be safe for users to use Simplified Payment Verification (section 8) to check for double spending, which only requires having the chain of block headers, or about 12KB per day. Only people trying to create new coins would need to run network nodes.
At first, most users would run network nodes, but as the network grows beyond a certain point, it would be left more and more to specialists with server farms of specialized hardware.
A server farm would only need to have one node on the network and the rest of the LAN connects with that one node.
The bandwidth [required for running a network node] might not be as prohibitive as you think. A typical transaction would be about 400 bytes (ECC is nicely compact). Each transaction has to be broadcast twice, so lets say 1KB per transaction.
Visa processed 37 billion transactions in FY2008, or an average of 100 million transactions per day. That many transactions would take 100GB of bandwidth, or the size of 12 DVD or 2 HD quality movies, or about $18 worth of bandwidth at current prices.
If the network were to get that big, it would take several years, and by then, sending 2 HD movies over the Internet would probably not seem like a big deal.
Source
The proof-of-work is a Hashcash style SHA-256 collision finding. It's a memoryless process where you do millions of hashes a second, with a small chance of finding one each time. The 3 or 4 fastest nodes' dominance would only be proportional to their share of the total CPU power.
There will be transaction fees, so nodes will have an incentive to receive and include all the transactions they can.
Source
The existing Visa credit card network processes about 15 million Internet purchases per day worldwide. Bitcoin can already scale much larger than that with existing hardware for a fraction of the cost. It never really hits a scale ceiling. If you’re interested, I can go over the ways it would cope with extreme size.
By Moore’s Law, we can expect hardware speed to be 10 times faster in 5 years and 100 times faster in 10. Even if Bitcoin grows at crazy adoption rates, I think computer speeds will stay ahead of the number of transactions.
Source
The current system where every user is a network node is not the intended configuration for large scale. That would be like every Usenet user runs their own NNTP server. The design supports letting users just be users.
The more burden it is to run a node, the fewer nodes there will be. Those few nodes will be big server farms. The rest will be client nodes that only do transactions and don't generate.
Source
While I don't think Bitcoin is practical for smaller micropayments right now, it will eventually be as storage and bandwidth costs continue to fall [on the global market]. If Bitcoin catches on on a big scale, it may already be the case by that time. Another way they can become more practical is if I implement the client-only mode [which uses the "Simplified Payment Verification" described in the design PDF] and the number of network nodes [more rapidly] consolidates into a smaller number of professional server farms. Whatever size micropayments you need will eventually be practical. I think in 5 or 10 years, the bandwidth and storage will seem trivial.
Source
It would be nice to keep the blk*.dat files small as long as we can.
The eventual solution will be to not care how big it gets.
But for now, while it's still small, it's nice to keep it small so new users can get going faster. When I eventually implement client-only mode, that won't matter much anymore.
Source
It can be phased in, like:
if (blocknumber > 115000) maxblocksize = largerlimit
It can start being in versions way ahead, so by the time it reaches that block number and goes into effect, the older versions that don't have it are already obsolete.
When we're near the cutoff block number, I can put an alert to old versions to make sure they know they have to upgrade.
Source
submitted by fruitsofknowledge to btc [link] [comments]

How bloXroute Achieves Its Performance

How bloXroute Achieves Its Performance

How bloXroute Achieves Its Performance

By Eleni Steinman, Strategy & Operations Manager (Original post here)

In our last blog post we talked about the importance of neutrality in building a system that solves the scalability bottleneck. In this post, we will discuss how the bloXroute Blockchain Distribution Network (BDN) scales blockchains to 1000s of transactions per second (TPS) — and we’re just getting started.

How are blocks currently propagated?

Blockchain nodes connect to peer nodes — who are often geographically dispersed around the world — to create a peer-to-peer (P2P) network. (Read our post by Soumya, Co-founder and CTO, on how peer nodes connect here). When a new block is mined, the winning node sends the block to its peers, who wait until they receive the entire block, validate that block and then sends the block on to their peers, until the block is propagated throughout the entire P2P network.
Slow block propagation has been an issue for many years. In late 2013 / early 2014, the Fast Relay Network (FRN) was introduced to mitigate this problem. The FRN was a volunteer service operated for many years for the benefit of the miner community, until its support was abruptly stopped, and later replaced by FIBRE. The Falcon Network is another relay service run by Cornell University and offers several enhancements over FRN such as faster block propagation.

Source: http://bitcoinstats.com/network/propagation/
While these relay networks have provided some performance benefits, they are not enough to remove the scalability bottleneck. This is because they were not built with the goal of scalability in mind (albeit FIBRE is specifically optimized for small blocks).
The scalability problem is a networking problem and requires a solution specifically designed to solve it. As a refresher (read our CEO and Co-founder, Uri Klarman’s post here for a more in depth explanation), sending larger blocks takes proportionally longer to send (e.g. 10x larger block takes 10x longer to send) and increases the probability of a fork by roughly the same proportion. At 100x larger blocks (only 300 TPS in bitcoin), the block propagation time becomes so long that it exceeds the 10 minutes interval between blocks and the blockchain breaks. This is why no blockchain can do full 300MB blocks every 10 seconds.

The bloXroute BDN

The bloXroute BDN is an enhancement to the Falcon Network. This new broadcast primitive that is able to capture the efficiencies of a single source node data transmission to send data faster while preserving the decentralized nature of blockchains (read more about how we do this here). We employ three elegant, yet powerful techniques to achieve this performance: transaction caching, cut-through routing, and an optimized dynamic scale topology.
Transaction caching: bloXroute reduces network redundancy through the use of transaction caching. Since transactions are already known when it’s time to send out the block (as an unconfirmed transaction stored in the mempool, rather than send a block with “raw” transactions, the BDN sends just a few bytes representing the transaction. It does this by indexing the transactions, and then utilizing the indexes when transmitting blocks.
The transaction propagation process is as follows:

https://preview.redd.it/rsn6uk4dlam21.png?width=1430&format=png&auto=webp&s=4036a2351410295d70fd79f6a6a69122a5c883a4
When a miner builds and then sends its block to the Gateway, the Gateway replaces each transaction with a 4-byte internal ID. This technique allows bloXroute to effectively compress the block size by more than 100x (given that the average raw transaction is approximately 500 bytes, the index size is 4 bytes and the Gateway has a full mapping of the transactions that exist in the block) and in turn, propagate blocks over 100x faster (or 100x larger blocks at the same speed). If a transaction in a block has no internal ID, it is not replaced in the block.
Next, the block is encrypted and propagated throughout the BDN (relay servers). Once the block is received by the Gateways on the other end, the originating Gateway sends the encryption key, the block is decrypted by the receiving Gateways and reconstructed using their internal index tables.

https://preview.redd.it/ykfu6ejglam21.png?width=1297&format=png&auto=webp&s=66c369bcd8079cacbc6a8382000a01bc6e614e2a
Xthin blocks, Graphene and Compact blocks are similar techniques that compact blocks by replacing each transaction with its 6 bytes hash (not the usual 32 bytes SHA-256 hash). In our previous post, Uri, Co-Founder and CEO, explains the limitations of these solutions when the volume of transactions increases as keeping mempool in sync becomes harder, and collisions become frequent. Conversely, the bloXroute BDN does not suffer from the same desynchronization as the relay servers have a clear picture of all the data.
Cut-through Routing: Without a relay network, each hop in the block propagation checks the validity of the block it is receiving before sending that block on. A node will transmit blocks to its peer only when the block is fully received and validated. The bloXroute BDN does not wait until the entire block is received before it sends the block to a peer node but rather immediately streams each packet of data as it is received through a well-provisioned dedicated network infrastructure. This technique, known as cut through routing, allows bloXroute to broadcast data 10–100x quicker. Only once the blocks are received by the node through the Gateway are they validated.
Optimized topology: Another advantage of the BDN is its optimized topology. New Bitcoin nodes can find initial network peers by querying a set of hard-coded DNS servers. The DNS servers provide joining nodes with their initial peer list to connect to and from there, new bitcoin nodes can crawl through the network. The result, is a web of random connections where data is not propagated throughout the network in the most optimal route.
https://preview.redd.it/rfpk81ljlam21.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=5b6cd1189fc503a0f54a0a49e33c03d829431bf5
Conversely, bloXroute has strategically placed servers around the world to send data as efficiently as possible to the geographically dispersed set of nodes that comprises the various blockchain networks.
Furthermore, the BDN Control Plane will dynamically select the optimal relay peer based on network latencies and load. In most cases, the Control Plane will connect the Gateway to the closest relay server in terms of latency (ping distance).
This optimized topology allows the BDN to propagate data to the entire network more efficiently than a P2P network. Again, because bloXroute is provably neutral, it is able to take advantage of this efficiency without impacting the decentralized nature of blockchains.

Conclusion

bloXroute is able to achieve 1000s TPS using internal IDs, cut-through routing and an optimized topology. These techniques can provide scale that far surpasses the current needs of any single blockchain and are compatible with all blockchains as they run underneath the consensus layer.
— — —
We’re always looking for good people!
If you’re equally excited to solve the scalability bottleneck for all blockchains, consider joining our team! We are always looking for passionate partners to help us on this important journey. Check out our available positions to work with us in our Chicago offices.
Learn more
submitted by brooke_bloXroute to bloXrouteLabs [link] [comments]

"Satoshi Nakamoto" the mysterious creator of Bitcoin is no other than the CIA

Bitcoin has surged to all time highs, Who created Bitcoin, and why?
The creator of Bitcoin is officially a name, “Satoshi Nakamoto” – very few people believe that it was a single male from Japan. In the early days of Bitcoin development this name is associated with original key-creation and communications on message boards, and then the project was officially handed over to others at which point this Satoshi character never appeared again (Although from time to time someone will come forward saying they are the real Satoshi Nakamoto, and then have their posts deleted).
Bitcoin could very well be the ‘one world currency’ that conspiracy theorists have been talking about for some time. It’s a kill five birds with one stone solution – not only is Bitcoin an ideal one world currency, it allows law enforcement a perfect record of all transactions on the network. It states very clearly on bitcoin.org (the official site) in big letters “Bitcoin is not anonymous” :
Some effort is required to protect your privacy with Bitcoin. All Bitcoin transactions are stored publicly and permanently on the network, which means anyone can see the balance and transactions of any Bitcoin address. However, the identity of the user behind an address remains unknown until information is revealed during a purchase or in other circumstances. This is one reason why Bitcoin addresses should only be used once.
Another advantage of Bitcoin is the problem of Quantitative Easing – the Fed (and thus, nearly all central banks in the world) have painted themselves in a corner, metaphorically speaking. QE ‘solved’ the credit crisis, but QE itself does not have a solution. Currently all currencies are in a race to zero – competing with who can print more money faster. Central Bankers who are in systemic analysis, their economic advisors, know this. They know that the Fiat money system is doomed, all what you can read online is true (just sensationalized) – it’s a debt based system based on nothing. That system was created, originally in the early 1900’s and refined during Breton Woods followed by the Nixon shock (This is all explained well in Splitting Pennies). In the early 1900’s – there was no internet! It is a very archaic system that needs to be replaced, by something modern, electronic, based on encryption. Bitcoin! It’s a currency based on ‘bits’ – but most importantly, Bitcoin is not the ‘one world currency’ per se, but laying the framework for larger cryptocurrency projects. In the case of central banks, who control the global monetary system, that would manifest in ‘Settlement Coin’ :
Two resources available almost exclusively to central banks could soon be opened up to additional users as a result of a new digital currency project designed by a little-known startup and Swiss bank UBS. One of those resources is the real-time gross settlement (RTGS) system used by central banks (it’s typically reserved for high-value transactions that need to be settled instantly), and the other is central bank-issued cash. Using the Utility Settlement Coin (USC) unveiled today, the five-member consortium that has sprung up around the project aims to help central banks open-up access to these tools to more customers. If successful, USC has the potential to create entirely new business models built on instant settling and easy cash transfers. In interview, Robert Sams, founder of London-based Clearmatics, said his firm initially worked with UBS to build the network, and that BNY Mellon, Deutsche Bank, ICAP and Santander are only just the first of many future members.
the NSA/CIA often works for big corporate clients, just as it has become a cliche that the Iraq war was about big oil, the lesser known hand in global politics is the banking sector. In other words, Bitcoin may have very well been ‘suggested’ or ‘sponsored’ by a banker, group of banks, or financial services firm. But the NSA (as we surmise) was the company that got the job done. And probably, if it was in fact ‘suggested’ or ‘sponsored’ by a private bank, they would have been waiting in the wings to develop their own Bitcoin related systems or as in the above “Settlement Coin.” So the NSA made Bitcoin – so what?
The FX markets currently represent the exchange between ‘major’ and ‘minor’ currencies. In the future, why not too they will include ‘cryptocurrencies’ – we’re already seeing the BTC/EUR pair popup on obscure brokers. When BTC/USD and BTC/EUR are available at major FX banks and brokers, we can say – from a global FX perspective, that Bitcoin has ‘arrived.’ Many of us remember the days when the synthetic “Euro” currency was a new artificial creation that was being adopted, although the Euro project is thousands of degrees larger than the Bitcoin project. But unlike the Euro, Bitcoin is being adopted at a near exponential rate by demand (Many merchants resisted the switch to Euros claiming it was eating into their profit margins and they were right!).
And to answer the question as to why Elite E Services is not actively involved in Bitcoin the answer is that previously, you can’t trade Bitcoin. Now we’re starting to see obscure brokers offering BTC/EUR but the liquidity is sparse and spreads are wacky – that will all change. When we can trade BTC/USD just like EUUSD you can bet that EES and a host of other algorithmic FX traders will be all over it! It will be an interesting trade for sure, especially with all the volatility, the cross ‘pairs’ – and new cryptocurrencies. For the record, for brokers- there’s not much difference adding a new symbol (currency pair) in MT4 they just need liquidity, which has been difficult to find.
So there’s really nothing revolutionary about Bitcoin, it’s just a logical use of technology in finance considering a plethora of problems faced by any central bank who creates currency. And there are some interesting caveats to Bitcoin as compared to major currencies; Bitcoin is a closed system (there are finite Bitcoin) – this alone could make such currencies ‘anti-inflationary’ and at the least, hold their value (the value of the USD continues to deteriorate slowly over time as new M3 introduced into the system.) But we need to pay
Here’s some interesting theories about who or whom is Satoshi:
A corporate conglomerate
Some researchers proposed that the name ‘Satoshi Nakamoto’ was derived from a combination of tech companies consisting of Samsung, Toshiba, Nakayama, and Motorola. The notion that the name was a pseudonym is clearly true and it is doubtful they reside in Japan given the numerous forum posts with a distinctly English dialect.
Craig Steven Wright
This Australian entrepreneur claims to be the Bitcoin creator and provided proof. But soon after, his offices were raided by the tax authorities on ‘an unrelated matter’
Soon after these stories were published, authorities in Australia raided the home of Mr Wright. The Australian Taxation Office said the raid was linked to a long-running investigation into tax payments rather than Bitcoin. Questioned about this raid, Mr Wright said he was cooperating fully with the ATO. “We have lawyers negotiating with them over how much I have to pay,” he said.
Other potential creators
Nick Szabo, and many others, have been suggested as potential Satoshi – but all have denied it:
The New Yorker published a piece pointing at two possible Satoshis, one of whom seemed particularly plausible: a cryptography graduate student from Trinity College, Dublin, who had gone on to work in currency-trading software for a bank and published a paper on peer-to-peer technology. The other was a Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, Vili Lehdonvirta. Both made denials. Fast Company highlighted an encryption patent application filed by three researchers – Charles Bry, Neal King and Vladimir Oks­man – and a circumstantial link involving textual analysis of it and the Satoshi paper which found the phrase “…computationally impractical to reverse” in both. Again, it was flatly denied.
THE WINNER: It was the NSA
The NSA has the capability, the motive, and the operational capacity – they have teams of cryptographers, the biggest fastest supercomputers in the world, and they see the need. Whether instructed by their friends at the Fed, in cooperation with their owners (i.e. Illuminati banking families), or as part of a DARPA project – is not clear and will never be known (unless a whistleblower comes forward). In fact, the NSA employs some of the best mathematicians and cryptographers in the world. Few know about their work because it’s a secret, and this isn’t the kind of job you leave to start your own cryptography company.
But the real smoking Gun, aside from the huge amount of circumstantial evidence and lack of a credible alternative, is the 1996 paper authored by NSA “HOW TO MAKE A MINT: THE CRYPTOGRAPHY OF ANONYMOUS ELECTRONIC CASH”
The NSA was one of the first organizations to describe a Bitcoin-like system. About twelve years before Satoshi Nakamotopublished his legendary white paper to the Metzdowd.com cryptography mailing list, a group of NSA information security researchers published a paper entitled How to Make a Mint: the Cryptography of Anonymous Electronic Cash in two prominent places, the first being an MIT mailing list and the second being much more prominent, The American Law Review
The paper outlines a system very much like Bitcoin in which secure financial transactions are possible through the use of a decentralized network the researchers refer informally to as a Bank. They list four things as indispensable in their proposed network: privacy, user identification (protection against impersonation), message integrity (protection against tampering/substitution of transaction information – that is, protection against double-spending), and nonrepudiation (protection against later denial of a transaction – a blockchain!).
It is evident that SHA-256, the algorithm Satoshi used to secure Bitcoin, was not available because it came about in 2001. However, SHA-1 would have been available to them, having been published in 1993.
Why would the NSA want to do this? One simple reason: Control.
As we explain in Splitting Pennies – Understanding Forex – the primary means the US dominates the world is through economic policy, although backed by bombs. And the critical support of the US Dollar is primarily, the military. The connection between the military and the US Dollar system is intertwined inextricably. There are thousands of great examples only one of them being how Iraq switched to the Euro right before the Army’s invasion.
In October 2000 Iraq insisted on dumping the US dollar – ‘the currency of the enemy’ – for the more multilateral euro. The changeover was announced on almost exactly the same day that the euro reached its lowest ebb, buying just $0.82, and the G7 Finance Ministers were forced to bail out the currency. On Friday the euro had reached $1.08, up 30 per cent from that time.
Almost all of Iraq’s oil exports under the United Nations oil-for-food programme have been paid in euros since 2001. Around 26 billion euros (£17.4bn) has been paid for 3.3 billion barrels of oil into an escrow account in New York. The Iraqi account, held at BNP Paribas, has also been earning a higher rate of interest in euros than it would have in dollars.
The point here is there are a lot of different types of control. The NSA monitors and collects literally all electronic communications; internet, phone calls, everything. They listen in even to encrypted voice calls with high powered microphones, devices like cellphones equipped with recording devices (See original “Clipper” chip). It’s very difficult to communicate on planet Earth in private, without the NSA listening. So it is only logical that they would also want complete control of the financial system, including records of all electronic transactions, which Bitcoin provides.
Could there be an ‘additional’ security layer baked into the Blockchain that is undetectable, that allows the NSA to see more information about transactions, such as network location data? It wouldn’t be so far fetched, considering their past work, such as Xerox copy machines that kept a record of all copies made (this is going back to the 70’s, now it’s common). Of course security experts will point to the fact that this layer remains invisible, but if this does exist – of course it would be hidden.
More to the point about the success of Bitcoin – its design is very solid, robust, manageable – this is not the work of a student. Of course logically, the NSA employs individuals, and ultimately it is the work of mathematicians, programmers, and cryptographers – but if we deduce the most likely group capable, willing, and motivated to embark on such a project, the NSA is the most likely suspect. Universities, on the other hand, didn’t product white papers like this from 1996.
Another question is that if it was the NSA, why didn’t they go through more trouble concealing their identity? I mean, the internet is rife with theories that it was in fact the NSA/CIA and “Satoshi Nakamoto” means in Japanese “Central Intelligence” – well there are a few answers for this, but to be congruent with our argument, it fits their profile.
Where could this ‘hidden layer’ be? Many think it could be in the public SHA-256, developed by NSA (which ironically, was the encryption algorithm of choice for Bitcoin – they could have chosen hundreds of others, which arguably are more secure):
Claims that the NSA created Bitcoin have actually been flung around for years. People have questioned why it uses the SHA-256 hash function, which was designed by the NSA and published by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). The fact that the NSA is tied to SHA-256 leads some to assume it’s created a backdoor to the hash function that no one has ever identified, which allows it to spy on Bitcoin users.
“If you assume that the NSA did something to SHA-256, which no outside researcher has detected, what you get is the ability, with credible and detectable action, they would be able to forge transactions. The really scary thing is somebody finds a way to find collisions in SHA-256 really fast without brute-forcing it or using lots of hardware and then they take control of the network,” cryptography researcher Matthew D. Green of Johns Hopkins University said in a previous interview.
Then there’s the question of “Satoshi Nakamoto” – if it was in fact the NSA, why not just claim ownership of it? Why all the cloak and dagger? And most importantly, if Satoshi Nakamoto is a real person, and not a group that wants to remain secret – WHY NOT come forward and claim your nearly $3 Billion worth of Bitcoin (based on current prices).
Did the NSA create Satoshi Nakamoto?
The CIA Project, a group dedicated to unearthing all of the government’s secret projects and making them public, hasreleased a video claiming Bitcoin is actually the brainchild of the US National Security Agency.
The video entitled CIA Project Bitcoin: Is Bitcoin a CIA or NSA project? claims that there is a lot of compelling evidences that proves that the NSA is behind Bitcoin. One of the main pieces of evidence has to do with the name of the mysterious man, woman or group behind the creation of Bitcoin, “Satoshi Nakamoto”.
According to the CIA Project, Satoshi Nakamoto means “Central Intelligence” in Japanese. Doing a quick web search, you’ll find out that Satoshi is usually a name given for baby boys which means “clear thinking, quick witted, wise,” while Nakamoto is a Japanese surname which means ‘central origin’ or ‘(one who lives) in the middle’ as people with this surname are found mostly in the Ryukyu islands which is strongly associated with the Ry?ky? Kingdom, a highly centralized kingdom that originated from the Okinawa Islands. So combining Nakamoto and Satoshi can be loosely interpreted as “Central Intelligence”.
Is it so really hard to believe? This is from an organization that until the Snowden leaks, secretly recorded nearly all internet traffic on the network level by splicing fiber optic cables. They even have a deep-sea splicing mission that will cut undersea cables and install intercept devices. Making Bitcoin wouldn’t even be a big priority at NSA.
Certainly, anonymity is one of the biggest myths about Bitcoin. In fact, there has never been a more easily traceable method of payment. Every single transaction is recorded and retained permanently in the public “blockchain”. The idea that the NSA would create an anarchic, peer-to-peer crypto-currency in the hope that it would be adopted for nefarious industries and become easy to track would have been a lot more difficult to believe before the recent leaks by Edward Snowden and the revelation that billions of phone calls had been intercepted by the US security services. We are now in a world where we now know that the NSA was tracking the pornography habits of Islamic “radicalisers” in order to discredit them and making deals with some of the world’s largest internet firms to insert backdoors into their systems.
And we’re not the only ones who believe this, in Russia they ‘know’ this to be true without sifting through all the evidence.
Nonetheless, Svintsov’s remarks count as some of the more extreme to emanate from the discussion. Svintsov told Russian broadcast news agency REGNUM:“All these cryptocurrencies [were] created by US intelligence agencies just to finance terrorism and revolutions.”Svintsov reportedly went on to explain how cryptocurrencies have started to become a payment method for consumer spending, and cited reports that terrorist organisations are seeking to use the technology for illicit means.
Let’s elaborate on what is ‘control’ as far as the NSA is concerned. Bitcoin is like the prime mover. All future cryptocurrencies, no matter how snazzy or functional – will never have the same original keys as Bitcoin. It created a self-sustained, self-feeding bubble – and all that followed. It enabled law enforcement to collect a host of criminals on a network called “Silk Road” and who knows what other operations that happened behind the scenes. Because of pesky ‘domestic’ laws, the NSA doesn’t control the internet in foreign countries. But by providing a ‘cool’ currency as a tool, they can collect information from around the globe and like Facebook, users provide this information voluntarily. It’s the same strategy they use like putting the listening device in the chips at the manufacturing level, which saves them the trouble of wiretapping, electronic eavesdropping, and other risky methods that can fail or be blocked. It’s impossible to stop a cellphone from listening to you, for example (well not 100%, but you have to physically rewire the device). Bitcoin is the same strategy on a financial level – by using Bitcoin you’re giving up your private transactional information. By itself, it would not identify you per se (as the blockchain is ‘anonymous’ but the transactions are there in the public register, so combined with other information, which the NSA has a LOT OF – they can triangulate their information more precisely.
That’s one problem solved with Bitcoin – another being the economic problem of QE (although with a Bitcoin market cap of $44 Billion, that’s just another day at the Fed buying MBS) – and finally, it squashes the idea of sovereignty although in a very, very, very subtle way. You see, a country IS a currency. Until now, currency has always been tied to national sovereignty (although the Fed is private, USA only has one currency, the US Dollar, which is exclusively American). Bitcoin is a super-national currency, or really – the world’s first one world currency.
Of course, this is all great praise for the DOD which seems to have a 50 year plan – but after tens of trillions spent we’d hope that they’d be able to do something better than catching terrorists (which mostly are artificial terrorists)
submitted by PeopleWhoDied to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Question about probability

I'm working on a math-centric research paper on Bitcoins, and I've noticed something that doesn't sit well with me that I'd like to clear up, if possible.
A lot of people seem to make the comparison that the math behind generating a block is similar to this situation:
You have a hat with 100 slips of paper, numbered 1-100. You draw a slip from the hat, and if it is < 15, you win. If not, you put it back in the hat and draw again. You do this until you find a slip with value < 15.
In this scenario, you have a chance of success = .15 (unless I'm being idiotic right now). Each time you pull a slip you have the same probability of success; that is, each pull is independent. The probability is constant.
Here is a forum post that uses this comparison
Even on the bitcoin wiki, it says that the probability of success remains constant:
There's no such thing as being 1% towards solving a block. You don't make progress towards solving it. After working on it for 24 hours, your chances of solving it are equal to what your chances were at the start or at any moment. Believing otherwise is what's known as the Gambler's fallacy
Source
Now, that's all well and good, but isn't bitcoin mining inherently different from this because it relies on hash functions?
My problem with this idea is that if you hash your block header, you get one output, and it's wrong. Then you increment your nonce and hash again, and get a completely different hash. You keep doing this and you keep getting completely different hashes. Because that's how (good) hash functions work. If you got the same hash, for two or more different inputs at any point, you found a collision in SHA-256 and that is a very, very bad thing for a hash function to have (and at this time, we don't think that SHA-256 has any collisions. It's still possible that there will be collisions, but for the sake of this argument, we should assume that it works exactly as it ought to, with no collisions).
So, couldn't you say that there are 2256 possible hashes, and when you hash a block header the first time and it's wrong, you've eliminated that possibility? So now there are 2256 - 1 possible hashes to try? And after n attempts, there are 2256 - n possible hashes? Similar to picking a slip of paper from the hat and removing it entirely, instead of putting it back?
I understand that the probability is still really, really low, but it IS increasing, isn't it? Every time you generate a new hash, you're getting 1 step closer to solving the block?
Or am I missing something completely?
This honestly isn't even important for my paper, it's just really bugging me right now.
submitted by UnhappyHobo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

InterValue: Analysis Of A New Anti-quantum Attack Cipher Algorithm

InterValue: Analysis Of A New Anti-quantum Attack Cipher Algorithm
https://preview.redd.it/50gpnoe1wdl11.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c636ddc4a1c49658cba067084009e557a113b8a8

InterValue aims to provide a global value Internet infrastructure. In response to deal with various problems that existing in the present blockchain infrastructure, InterValue optimizes the protocol and mechanism of blockchain technology at all levels, which can achieve the support agreement of value transmission network. At present, the InterValue 2.0 testnet has been released, we designed and implemented a new HashNet consensus mechanism. Transaction speed within one single shard exceeds 280,000 TPS and 4 million TPS for the whole network. Security (anti-quantum attack characteristics) is undoubtedly the highlight of InterValue under the goal of establishing a low-level infrastructure for the whole field of ecology.
What is the quantum attack?
Quantum computing is a new way of building computers—using the quantum properties of particles to perform operations on data, it is probably the same way as traditional computers. In some cases, the amount of algorithmic acceleration is unusual. It is this characteristics that makes some difficult problems that exist in the electronic computer environment become easy to calculate in the quantum computer. This superior computing power of quantum computers has influenced the security of existing public key cryptography which based on computational complexity. This is the quantum attack.
What does anti-quantum attack mean?
Algorithms have always been the underlying core of blockchain technology. Most of the current algorithms are unable to withstand quantum attacks. It means that all the information of the user will be exposed to the quantum computer. If you have an anti-quantum attack algorithm, it means that the personal information is safe, at least with current technology, it cannot be cracked. Anti-quantum attack algorithms mean security. The impact of quantum attacks on digital currencies is devastating. Quantum attacks directly disrupt existing information security systems. Quantum attacks will expose the assets in the digital industry, including the benefits of mining; the keys to your wallet will be cracked and the wallet will no longer be secure. Totally, the existing security system will be disintegrated. Therefore, it is imperative to develop anti-quantum attack algorithms in advance. It is a necessary technical means to firmly protect the privacy of users.
InterValue uses a new anti-quantum attack cryptographic algorithm at the anti-quantum attack level. By replacing the ECDSA signature algorithm with the NTRUsign signature algorithm that based on the integer lattice, and replacing the existing SHA series algorithm with the Keccak-512 hash algorithm, the speed, and threats of the rapid quantum computation decrease.

Adopt NTRUsign digital signature algorithm
Current ECDSA signature algorithm
The current blockchain mainly uses the ECDSA digital signature algorithm based on elliptic curve. The signature algorithm: First, the public-private key pair needs to be generated, the private key user keeps it, the public key can be distributed to other people; secondly, the private key pair can be used and a specific message is signed; finally, the party that owns the signature public key is able to verify the signature. ECDSA has the advantages of small system parameters, fast processing speed, small key size, strong anti-attack and low bandwidth requirements. However, the quantum computer can implement a very efficient SHOR attack algorithm by ECDSA signature algorithm, and the ECDSA signature algorithm cannot resist the quantum attack.
Adopt new NTRUsign-251 signature algorithm
At present, the public key cryptosystem against quantum SHOR algorithm attacks mainly includes public key cryptography that based on lattice theory, code-based public key system represented by McEliece public key cryptosystem and multivariate polynomial represented by MQ public key cryptography. The security of McEliece public key cryptosystem is based on the error correction code problem, which is strong in security but low in computational efficiency. The MQ public key cryptosystem, that is, the multivariate quadratic polynomial public key cryptosystem, based on the intractability of the multivariate quadratic polynomial equations on the finite field, has obvious disadvantages in terms of security. In contrast, the public key encryption system based on lattice theory is simple, fast, and takes up less storage space. InterValue uses the signature algorithm based on the lattice theory NTRUSign-251. The specific implementation process of the algorithm is as follows:

https://preview.redd.it/byyzx8k3wdl11.png?width=762&format=png&auto=webp&s=d454123cabbe730271b66362a55e17b861ad50b4
It has been proved that the security of the NTRUSign-251 signature algorithm is ultimately equivalent to finding the shortest vector problem in a 502-dimensional integer lattice, but the SHOR attack algorithm for the shortest vector problem in the lattice is invalid, and there is no other fast solutions under the quantum computer. The best heuristic algorithm is also exponential, and the time complexity of attacking NTRUSign-251 signature algorithm is about 2168. Therefore, InterValue uses NTRUSign-251 algorithm that can resist SHOR algorithm attack under quantum computing.

Adopt Keccak512 hash algorithm
The common anti-quantum hash algorithm
The most effective attack methods for hash algorithm under quantum computer is GROVER algorithm, which can reduce the attack complexity of Hash algorithm from O (2^n) to O (2^n/2). Therefore, the current bit adopts the Hash algorithm PIREMD160 whose output length is only 160 bits, under this circumstance, quantum attacks algorithm used in the currency system is not safe. An effective way of resisting quantum attacks is to reduce the threat of the GROVER algorithm by increasing the output length of the Hash algorithm. It is generally believed that the Hash algorithm can effectively resist quantum attacks as long as the output length of the hash algorithm is not less than 256 bits. In addition to the threat of quantum attacks, a series of hash functions that are widely used in practice, such as MD4, MD5, SHA-1, and HAVAL, are attacked by traditional methods such as differential analysis, modulo difference, and message modification methods. Therefore, blockchains’ Hash algorithm also needs to consider the resistance of traditional attacks.
Winning the hash algorithm Keccak512
Early blockchain projects such as Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Ethereum used SHA series Hashing algorithms that exist design flaws (but not fatal). Recently, new blockchain projects have been adopted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The SHA-3 plan series algorithm is a new Hash algorithm.
InterValue adopts the SHA-3 plan's winning algorithm Keccak512, which contains many latest design concepts and ideas of hash function and cryptographic algorithm. It is simple in design, which is convenient for hardware implementation. The algorithm was submitted by Guido Bertoni, Joan Daemen, Michael Peters, and Giles Van Assche in October 2008. The Keccak512 algorithm uses a standard sponge structure that maps input bits of arbitrary length into fixed-length output bits. The speed is fast, with an average speed of 12.5 cycles per byte under the Intel Core 2 processor.

https://preview.redd.it/z0nnrjp4wdl11.jpg?width=724&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=bef29aafeb1ef74b21bacb6db3f07987bf0a7ba5
As shown in the figure, in the absorption phase of the sponge structure, each message packet is XORed with the r bits inside the state, and then encapsulated into 1600 bits of data together with the fixed c bits to perform the round function f processing, and then into the squeeze. In the extrusion phase, a hash of n-bit fixed output length can be generated by iterating 24 cycles. Each loop R has only the last step round constant, but the round constant is often ignored in collision attacks. The algorithm proved to have good differential properties, and until now third-party cryptanalysis did not show that Keccak512 has security weaknesses. The first type of original image attack complexity for the Keccak512 algorithm under quantum computer is 2^256, and the second type of original image attack complexity for the Keccak512 algorithm is 2^128, so InterValue combined with the Keccak512 algorithm can resist the GROVER algorithm attack under quantum computing.

Written in the end
Quantum computing has gone through 40 years from the theory to practice. From the emergence to the present, it has entered the stage of quantitative change to qualitative change in technology accumulation, business environment, and performance improvement. For the blockchain, the most deadly part is not investor's doubt, but the accelerated development of quantum computers. In the future, quantum computers are most likely to subvert the traditional technical route of classical computing and have a larger field of development. We are sympathetic to its destructive power to the existing blockchain, and we look forward to helping the entire blockchain industry to shape a new ecosystem. On the occasion of entering the new "quantum era, trusting society", the InterValue team believes that only by fully understanding the essence of quantum cryptography (quantum communication) and anti-quantum cryptography, can we calmly stand on a high level and arrange the outline.
submitted by intervalue to InterValue [link] [comments]

InterValue: Analysis Of A New Anti-quantum Attack Cipher Algorithm

InterValue: Analysis Of A New Anti-quantum Attack Cipher Algorithm
https://preview.redd.it/pl9ytli1smd11.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=afd90001218bb19c252f927ef2e292cb788c9a9d
InterValue aims to provide a global value Internet infrastructure. In response to deal with various problems that existing in the present blockchain infrastructure, InterValue optimizes the protocol and mechanism of blockchain technology at all levels, which can achieve the support agreement of value transmission network. At present, the InterValue 2.0 testnet has been released, we designed and implemented a new HashNet consensus mechanism. Transaction speed within one single shard exceeds 280,000 TPS and 4 million TPS for the whole network. Security (anti-quantum attack characteristics) is undoubtedly the highlight of InterValue under the goal of establishing a low-level infrastructure for the whole field of ecology.
What is the quantum attack?
Quantum computing is a new way of building computers—using the quantum properties of particles to perform operations on data, it is probably the same way as traditional computers. In some cases, the amount of algorithmic acceleration is unusual. It is this characteristics that makes some difficult problems that exist in the electronic computer environment become easy to calculate in the quantum computer. This superior computing power of quantum computers has influenced the security of existing public key cryptography which based on computational complexity. This is the quantum attack.
What does anti-quantum attack mean?
Algorithms have always been the underlying core of blockchain technology. Most of the current algorithms are unable to withstand quantum attacks. It means that all the information of the user will be exposed to the quantum computer. If you have an anti-quantum attack algorithm, it means that the personal information is safe, at least with current technology, it cannot be cracked. Anti-quantum attack algorithms mean security. The impact of quantum attacks on digital currencies is devastating. Quantum attacks directly disrupt existing information security systems. Quantum attacks will expose the assets in the digital industry, including the benefits of mining; the keys to your wallet will be cracked and the wallet will no longer be secure. Totally, the existing security system will be disintegrated. Therefore, it is imperative to develop anti-quantum attack algorithms in advance. It is a necessary technical means to firmly protect the privacy of users.
InterValue uses a new anti-quantum attack cryptographic algorithm at the anti-quantum attack level. By replacing the ECDSA signature algorithm with the NTRUsign signature algorithm that based on the integer lattice, and replacing the existing SHA series algorithm with the Keccak-512 hash algorithm, the speed, and threats of the rapid quantum computation decrease.
Adopt NTRUsign digital signature algorithm
Current ECDSA signature algorithm
The current blockchain mainly uses the ECDSA digital signature algorithm based on elliptic curve. The signature algorithm: First, the public-private key pair needs to be generated, the private key user keeps it, the public key can be distributed to other people; secondly, the private key pair can be used and a specific message is signed; finally, the party that owns the signature public key is able to verify the signature. ECDSA has the advantages of small system parameters, fast processing speed, small key size, strong anti-attack and low bandwidth requirements. However, the quantum computer can implement a very efficient SHOR attack algorithm by ECDSA signature algorithm, and the ECDSA signature algorithm cannot resist the quantum attack.
Adopt new NTRUsign-251 signature algorithm
At present, the public key cryptosystem against quantum SHOR algorithm attacks mainly includes public key cryptography that based on lattice theory, code-based public key system represented by McEliece public key cryptosystem and multivariate polynomial represented by MQ public key cryptography. The security of McEliece public key cryptosystem is based on the error correction code problem, which is strong in security but low in computational efficiency. The MQ public key cryptosystem, that is, the multivariate quadratic polynomial public key cryptosystem, based on the intractability of the multivariate quadratic polynomial equations on the finite field, has obvious disadvantages in terms of security. In contrast, the public key encryption system based on lattice theory is simple, fast, and takes up less storage space. InterValue uses the signature algorithm based on the lattice theory NTRUSign-251. The specific implementation process of the algorithm is as follows:
https://preview.redd.it/uzuqi589smd11.png?width=762&format=png&auto=webp&s=29670c99027fdcebadca64730ef2e3862f960192
It has been proved that the security of the NTRUSign-251 signature algorithm is ultimately equivalent to finding the shortest vector problem in a 502-dimensional integer lattice, but the SHOR attack algorithm for the shortest vector problem in the lattice is invalid, and there is no other fast solutions under the quantum computer. The best heuristic algorithm is also exponential, and the time complexity of attacking NTRUSign-251 signature algorithm is about 2168. Therefore, InterValue uses NTRUSign-251 algorithm that can resist SHOR algorithm attack under quantum computing.
Adopt Keccak512 hash algorithm
The common anti-quantum hash algorithm
The most effective attack methods for hash algorithm under quantum computer is GROVER algorithm, which can reduce the attack complexity of Hash algorithm from O (2^n) to O (2^n/2). Therefore, the current bit adopts the Hash algorithm PIREMD160 whose output length is only 160 bits, under this circumstance, quantum attacks algorithm used in the currency system is not safe. An effective way of resisting quantum attacks is to reduce the threat of the GROVER algorithm by increasing the output length of the Hash algorithm. It is generally believed that the Hash algorithm can effectively resist quantum attacks as long as the output length of the hash algorithm is not less than 256 bits. In addition to the threat of quantum attacks, a series of hash functions that are widely used in practice, such as MD4, MD5, SHA-1, and HAVAL, are attacked by traditional methods such as differential analysis, modulo difference, and message modification methods. Therefore, blockchains’ Hash algorithm also needs to consider the resistance of traditional attacks.
Winning the hash algorithm Keccak512
Early blockchain projects such as Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Ethereum used SHA series Hashing algorithms that exist design flaws (but not fatal). Recently, new blockchain projects have been adopted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The SHA-3 plan series algorithm is a new Hash algorithm.
InterValue adopts the SHA-3 plan's winning algorithm Keccak512, which contains many latest design concepts and ideas of hash function and cryptographic algorithm. It is simple in design, which is convenient for hardware implementation. The algorithm was submitted by Guido Bertoni, Joan Daemen, Michael Peters, and Giles Van Assche in October 2008. The Keccak512 algorithm uses a standard sponge structure that maps input bits of arbitrary length into fixed-length output bits. The speed is fast, with an average speed of 12.5 cycles per byte under the Intel Core 2 processor.
https://preview.redd.it/zwfzybeasmd11.jpg?width=724&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=e0710e7fb1f80b7aa6517a296e2cadd6a51bd4c8
As shown in the figure, in the absorption phase of the sponge structure, each message packet is XORed with the r bits inside the state, and then encapsulated into 1600 bits of data together with the fixed c bits to perform the round function f processing, and then into the squeeze. In the extrusion phase, a hash of n-bit fixed output length can be generated by iterating 24 cycles. Each loop R has only the last step round constant, but the round constant is often ignored in collision attacks. The algorithm proved to have good differential properties, and until now third-party cryptanalysis did not show that Keccak512 has security weaknesses. The first type of original image attack complexity for the Keccak512 algorithm under quantum computer is 2^256, and the second type of original image attack complexity for the Keccak512 algorithm is 2^128, so InterValue combined with the Keccak512 algorithm can resist the GROVER algorithm attack under quantum computing.
Written in the end
Quantum computing has gone through 40 years from the theory to practice. From the emergence to the present, it has entered the stage of quantitative change to qualitative change in technology accumulation, business environment, and performance improvement. For the blockchain, the most deadly part is not investor's doubt, but the accelerated development of quantum computers. In the future, quantum computers are most likely to subvert the traditional technical route of classical computing and have a larger field of development. We are sympathetic to its destructive power to the existing blockchain, and we look forward to helping the entire blockchain industry to shape a new ecosystem. On the occasion of entering the new "quantum era, trusting society", the InterValue team believes that only by fully understanding the essence of quantum cryptography (quantum communication) and anti-quantum cryptography, can we calmly stand on a high level and arrange the outline.
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How to generate Bitcoin vanity address with vanitygen tool Will Quantum Computers BREAK Bitcoin Someday? (Explained For Beginners) hash zone, free 20 GH/s towards their SHA-256 mining What would happen to Bitcoin if SHA256 were broken? what is SHA-256 Algorithm  mining Algorithm

The SHA256 Collision That Wasn’t. From the Depths of Python’s Cryptography Package. Tim Cotten . Follow. Nov 6, 2018 · 3 min read. This article reviews a (mistaken) GitHub issue reporting a possible SHA256 collision and how the incorrect conclusion was arrived at, as well as how it was proven incorrect. The impact of any such collision is expounded on. On November 5th, 2018 I was hanging ... The probability of 2 people having the same bitcoin address is actually a lot higher than people may suspect by (faulty) intuition. In fact, the likelihood of collision is related to the Birthday Problem (read about it). As the number of people and addresses generated increases, likelihood of a collision increases close to exponentially. Also each bitcoin hash is two (albeit constrained) SHA256. @James: your link divides by 1.37e9 and gives 26,254, but dividing by the correct 13.7e9 does give 2,625 like your text. Both: in Oct '17 bitcoin is up to 10e18x2/s thus 5.4e11 years or 39 universes. Plus, as you say, storing and comparing. $\endgroup$ – dave_thompson_085 Oct 19 '17 ... Since Bitcoin addresses are basically random numbers, it is possible, although extremely unlikely, for two people to independently generate the same address. This is called a collision. If this happens, then both the original owner of the address and the colliding owner could spend money sent to that address. It would not be possible for the colliding person to spend the original owner's ... Yes, there is a collision probability & it's probably somewhat too high. The exact probability depends on what "8 characters" means. Does "8 characters" mean: A) You store 8 hex characters of the hash? That would store 32 bits. B) You store 8 characters of BASE-64? That would store 48 bits.

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How to generate Bitcoin vanity address with vanitygen tool

How We Created the First SHA-1 Collision and What it Means for Hash Security - Duration: 43:11. ... Bitcoin Halving 2020, Baseline Protocol, Unstoppable Domains & More! (Crypto Over Coffee Ep.7 ... The Computationally-Difficult Problem Bitcoin mining a block is difficult because the SHA-256 hash of a block's header must be lower than or equal to the target in order for the block to be ... The SHA-256 algorithm is used to mine bitcoin, It is worth noting SHA-256 is part of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash(SHA-2 (Secure Hash Algorithm 2) is a set of cryptographic hash functions designed ... Start mining today with instant miner setup. free 20 GH/s towards their SHA-256 mining. https://goo.gl/1mTm6h Enjoy $25 free from us just for signing up! Earn $5 for every person you refer, $10 ... How does the hash function work in the world of Bitcoin mining? Peter Van Valkenburgh of the Coin Center explains how the hash function in Bitcoin uses entropy to select Bitcoin miners. As always ...

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