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Aeon

Aeon (AEON) is a private, secure, untraceable currency. You are your bank, you control your funds, and nobody can trace your transfers.
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10-05 13:02 - 'GPU not CPU Tee-shirt for miners. Let me know what you think :)' (amazon.com) by /u/M77OR removed from /r/Bitcoin within 13-23min

GPU not CPU Tee-shirt for miners. Let me know what you think :)
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: M77OR
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Some sites to make extra money

Hello Fellow Redditors,
I am going to list some of my income sources. I will try to give as much information as I can.
Some details about me:I am u/abhiearns, I am currently studying. I want to create some sort of extra income sources. I have been trying to use beermoney as well as other passive income communities like passive_income, passiveincome to find some sites and sources that can work for me.
Enough with the details, Let start by listing some of my extra income sources.
Active Earning: So, I will start with sites on which you have to work actively and devote some serious hours to earn some extra income. These are some beermoney sites (include survey sites, and other such sites):


Passive Earning (No Initial Investments): These will list some of my passive earning sources, I am not listing my investments here because I think they deserve a separate section.Disclaimer: I have 2 laptops and an extra phone so I use all of them for earning, the payments may vary depending on the number and power of various computers.




Passive Earning (Investments Required): These are the sources which require some sort of initial investment. These sources can be risky and there are chances to lose money.



\** I am still trying other sites and apps. I will keep updating this post.*
These are some of the sources I use to earn, I highly recommend these. I won't say you will become a millionaire using these but still its little more than you had yesterday.
submitted by abhiearns to thesidehustle [link] [comments]

Some extra income sources for you

Hello Fellow Redditors,
I am going to list some of my income sources. I will try to give as much information as I can.
Some details about me:I am u/abhiearns, I am currently studying. I want to create some sort of extra income sources. I have been trying to use beermoney as well as other passive income communities like passive_income, passiveincome to find some sites and sources that can work for me.
Enough with the details, Let start by listing some of my extra income sources.
Active Earning: So, I will start with sites on which you have to work actively and devote some serious hours to earn some extra income. These are some beermoney sites (include survey sites, and other such sites):
Passive Earning (No Initial Investments): These will list some of my passive earning sources, I am not listing my investments here because I think they deserve a separate section.Disclaimer: I have 2 laptops and an extra phone so I use all of them for earning, the payments may vary depending on the number and power of various computers.
Passive Earning (Investments Required): These are the sources which require some sort of initial investment. These sources can be risky and there are chances to lose money.
\** I am still trying other sites and apps. I will keep updating this post.*
These are some of the sources I use to earn, I highly recommend these. I won't say you will become a millionaire using these but still its little more than you had yesterday.
submitted by abhiearns to clicksforbeermoney [link] [comments]

Video card prices and cryptocurrency mining v.2: electric boogaloo

Six months ago, I put together a post on the impact of cryptocurrency mining on the prices of video cards. The hope was that supply would increase, demand would drop, and prices would return to normal. Unfortunately, prices are on the rise again.
I've therefore updated and rewritten the original post to reflect a situation that affects a large number of the builders on /buildapc.
So, you may have noticed a resurgence in discussion about the current hike in the price of video cards. Or you may have found the price of certain cards (especially, but not limited to, AMD's RX 570/580 and Nvidia's 1060/1070) higher than you expected.
You know, I did. What's going on?
In effect, cryptocurrency mining (the solving of complex mathematical problems that underlies the transactions for a given currency) continues to drive up demand for video cards, both new and used, as people invest in consumer hardware to get involved. Consequently, the availability of cards is low, and prices are high.
With major retailer stock running low, it's hard to get an idea of the inflation at play. As a very general idea, here's a basic rundown of mid-tier recommended retail prices compared to current reseller prices on Amazon:
Card RRP (USD) Amazon
RX 570 4GB ~$179 ~$400+
RX 580 8GB ~$229 ~$500+
GTX 1060 6GB ~$249 ~$400+
GTX 1070 8GB ~$379 ~$600+
GTX 1070 Ti 8GB ~$450 ~$750+
This again? Why now?
Cryptocurrency prices are spiralling, and people are looking to mine whatever they can. Moreover, the nature of new cryptocurrencies encourages the purchase of consumer hardware:
Bitcoin remains the largest of these currencies, but increasing concern about transaction speed and cost has recently led to a rise in alternatives. The most prominent of these is Ethereum.
Ethereum is designed to be resistant to ASICs - chips designed specifically for cryptocurrency mining - which means that potential miners must stick to consumer video cards.
What happens next?
Anyone who can confidently predict the long term fortunes of the cryptocurrency market probably isn't browsing /buildapc threads on the prices of computer hardware.
Still, eventually™ it is intended that Ethereum will switch from a proof of work (i.e. mining) to a proof of stake (based on possession of currency) system. Long story short, this will mean no more video card demand from Ethereum miners.
Unfortunately, there is no fixed date for when the switch is due to occur. Not to mention that this says nothing of other coins that users may try to mine.
What can I do in the meantime?
Further reading (updated):
PC Gamer - Hang onto your graphics cards, as cryptocurrency mining spikes GPUs prices
Tweaktown - Mid/high-end GPU prices to increase because of mining & PUBG
With this in mind, please refrain from creating new discussion threads about the effect of mining on the price of video cards, and include any specific questions as part of build help threads or in the daily simple questions post. Thanks!
submitted by CustardFilled to buildapc [link] [comments]

Some Earning Experiments

Hello Fellow Redditors,
I am going to list some of my income sources. I will try to give as much information as I can.
Some details about me:I am u/abhiearns, I am currently studying. I want to create some sort of extra income sources. I have been trying to use beermoney as well as other passive income communities like passive_income, passiveincome to find some sites and sources that can work for me.
Enough with the details, Let start by listing some of my extra income sources.
Active Earning: So, I will start with sites on which you have to work actively and devote some serious hours to earn some extra income. These are some beermoney sites (include survey sites, and other such sites):
Passive Earning (No Initial Investments): These will list some of my passive earning sources, I am not listing my investments here because I think they deserve a separate section.Disclaimer: I have 2 laptops and an extra phone so I use all of them for earning, the payments may vary depending on the number and power of various computers.
Passive Earning (Investments Required): These are the sources which require some sort of initial investment. These sources can be risky and there are chances to lose money.

\** I am still trying other sites and apps. I will keep updating this post.*
These are some of the sources I use to earn, I highly recommend these. I won't say you will become a millionaire using these but still its little more than you had yesterday.
submitted by abhiearns to AbhiEarns [link] [comments]

GPU Mining Crash Course - START HERE!

Welcome All to the GPUMining Crash Course!
With the increase in prices in cryptocurrency, a lot of people are getting back into mining and a lot of people are brand new to the concept overall. So, I quickly wrote this crash course to help you understand what to expect and how to successfully mine your first cryptocurrency. This crash course isn't gonna have all of the fluff you'd see in a normal publication. This is just everything you need to know to get up and running on your first cryptocurrency mining rig.

What is cryptocurrency mining?

One of the main things about cryptocurrencies is that they are "decentralized". Sounds great, but WTF does that even mean? Well, the easiest way to explain it is...
You know how if you want to send your friend/family money digitally, you can do so through your bank. Your bank likely takes a transaction fee and in a few days they will transfer the money. Since cryptocurrencies are decentralized, they don't have a bank or organization to fulfill the transfer of money. Instead, they outsource the computing power of their cryptocurrency network to miners (soon to be you). These miners are verifying transactions, securing the blockchain, and powering the cryptocurrency's specific network among other things. As an incentive, the miners collect transaction fees on the transactions that they verify and collect block rewards while new currency is still being introduced into the ecosystem.

What kind of rig should I build?

You can mine cryptocurrencies using your CPU, GPU, FPGA, or ASIC, but this is a GPU Mining subreddit, so I will cater this to GPUs.
For building a great all-around GPU rig, there are two models of GPUs that I'd recommend:
Both of these GPUs have solid hashrates across most mining algorithms and for a decent price! You should be able to find both of these kinds of GPUs used for around $200-$250 each, which is a great price if you know what happened during the last mining craze! ($200 GPUs were out of stock everywhere and people were reselling them for $600+ each)
There are also plenty of great AMD GPUs for mining, but I've worked mostly with Nvidia so that's why both of my recommendations are Nvidia and not AMD.
Other parts to your rig that you'll need are listed below. Most of these can be pieces of crap and are just needed to make the rig actually run, but the one spot you DON'T want to cheap out on is the power supply unit. A decent power supply unit will keep your home from burning down while also keeping your rigs up and running smoothly. Here are my recommendations:

She's built, now what?

Now you need to do a few things. I am a Windows miner, so I will be speaking to Windows here:
  1. Update Windows - Do all of the updates. Just do it.
  2. Update Drivers - Go to the EVGA website and download GeForce experience. It will keep your GPU drivers up to date.
  3. Go to Windows Device Manager and make sure all of your GPUs show up under "Display Adapters". If it is there, but it isn't showing the Name/Model of the GPU as the name, right click it and select "Update Driver". This should fix it.
Assuming you've done all of this, you're ready to download a mining application.

Mining Software

There are tons to choose from! Claymore, Phoenix, EWBF, LolMiner, etc... It can be overwhelming pretty quickly since they all have different algorithm support, speeds, efficiencies, and a whole lot more. On top of that, in order to get them running you need to set up batch files to call the proper exe, point you to the correct pool, and a whole bunch of other stuff that can be confusing to a new user. Not to mention, you will probably need a separate miner, config file, batch file, etc. for each different algorithm that you're interested in mining on.
Instead, I recommend that you download a miner management software that will take care of most of this tedious work for you. There are a few in the sidebar, but the /GPUMining favorite is AIOMiner. It was developed by our very own community member, xixspiderxix with the intention of making mining as easy as possible to do and without any fees. It supports over 100 different algorithms, so you'll be able to mine nearly ANY cryptocurrency you'd like. Just download it from their website and it will take you through a quick tutorial to help you get set up! You can also connect your rig to their website for remote monitoring and control. You've probably seen a few of their posts around this subreddit.
Other Windows mining softwares include:
Note: Many mining softwares have fees built into them. Most are around 1%, but can go as high as 5% or greater! You want a mining software with little or no fees at all so that you get to keep as much cryptocurrency as possible. These fees aren't something you actively pay, the software will automatically take it by mining on the developers behalf for a given amount of time and then switching back to mining on your own behalf. So, please be diligent in the software that you evaluate and make sure it is reputable.

I keep hearing about NiceHash. What is that?

The asshole of the mining industry. Jk, but not really.
NiceHash is a software program that allows you to sell your rig's hashing power to someone on their marketplace. They market themselves as profitable mining, but you're not really mining. You're selling your power in exchange for Bitcoin.
They did a great job telling people that with them, you're always mining the most profitable coin, but that's just not true. Since it is a mining marketplace, they make you mine whatever their most expensive contract is. If their contracts are below market prices, then you're not operating as efficiently and profitably as you could be.
NiceHash also has a sketchy history, which continues to this day. In 2017, they were hacked and lost $65M worth of Bitcoin. No one got paid out for MONTHS and many of their executives conveniently resigned. Their platform is also used to destroy cryptocurrencies. Since people are able to purchase mining power on their platform, people have used their platform to purchase enough mining power to control individual cryptocurrencies and duplicate coins, which increased the malicious user's wealth while completely destroying the integrity of the coin's blockchain. HoriZEN (formerly ZenCash), Ethereum Classic, and many other great cryptocurrencies have been the victim of NiceHash's platform.
For this and many other reasons, we highly recommend that you stay AWAY from Nicehash. We understand that it is extremely easy to use and you get paid in bitcoin, but they are destroying the industry with their greed and lack of motivation to change their platform for the protection of cryptocurrencies.

Concluding Thoughts

This is pretty much everything you need to know to get started. We covered the hardware, setting up the software, which software to use, and AIOMiner's tutorial will get you up to speed on how to actually mine the cryptocurrency that you want better than I can explain it, so I'll leave that part to them.
If you have any questions on this crash course, please leave a comment below where myself and other community members will be able to help you out.
submitted by The_Brutally_Honest to gpumining [link] [comments]

Idle-Empire - Earn PayPal, Gift Cards & More | An extensive overview

Introduction

This is a full overview about Idle-Empire, a GPT (Get-Paid-To) site that's been around since 2015. Idle-Empire is primarily targeted towards gamers, but they also have payouts through PayPal, Gift Cards, Cryptocurrencies, and Perfect Money - so I think it's a good fit for beermoney too!
Idle-Empire has a lot of different earning and payout methods, some that you won't find on regular GPT sites. I'll go over every earning and payout method in this post.

Links

You get 500 Points ($0.05) for free when you sign up through my referral link, and of course, you support me too. I'll also include a clean link for people who prefer not to use my referral link:

Referral Link | Clean Link

Supported Countries

As far as I'm aware, there are no country restrictions on Idle-Empire. Everyone can sign up. There are some earning methods where your country does not matter, for others it does matter. People from all countries are able to idle, mine, complete promotions, and collect referrals. The availability of surveys, offers, and videos depend on your country.

Currency Value

Idle-Empire uses the term "Points" for their virtual currency. 10,000 Points are worth $1.00.

Payout Proof

I can provide this Coinbase payout proof.

Payout Conditions

The minimum payout amount is $0.10 for most payout methods. Some payout methods like gift cards ($1.00 - $10.00) or PayPal ($2.50) have a higher minimum payout amount.
You'll need to verify your account before you can make your first payout. You can verify your account with your mobile phone number, a verification code will be sent to your phone number.

Earning Methods

In this section, I'll describe all available earning methods and add my personal opinion and experience about every method.

Surveys & Offers

I guess everybody here is familiar with the concept of surveys and offers. They are tasks that involve answering questions, downloading programs and mobile apps, registering on platforms, and much more. It's a grind but it can pay off since there are some offers that pay good money. Idle-Empire has a number of different offerwalls, here's a full list:
Personally, I like doing surveys and offers because they pay well. But it's also more work than other earning methods. No pain, no gain.

Videos

Idle-Empire has videos from EngageMe.TV, Smores.TV, and Hideout.TV. I believe many of you guys are familiar with those 3 providers, they are all owned by AdscendMedia. All you have to do is watch videos and sometimes there's gonna be an advertisement in between videos, and after every 3 ads, you get paid 50 Points.
I liked to do videos in the past because it was easy and fast. Now I do it less, I feel that it became slower because I get fewer ads than before.

Game Servers

You have to join the Team Fortress 2 game servers of Idle-Empire and every minute you receive 1 Point. That's 1440 Points per day, which is $0.144 per day or $4.32 per month. It's not much but you don't have to do anything for it except being on the server. This process is called "idling" because you don't do anything. Idle-Empire shows video ads on the servers, so I guess that's how they can afford to pay people for being on the servers.
Team Fortress 2 is free-to-play on Steam, so everyone can just install it.
Idle-Empire also has an Autojoin tool which makes sure you automatically get reconnect to the server in case of a disconnected (can happen if your internet is down for a moment).
I'm usually on the game servers 24/7 because it's free money for me - my computer is always running anyways and having the game run in the background doesn't bother me since it's not slowing down my computer.

Mining

Most people will have noticed the cryptocurrency craze during 2017 and 2018, where mining also played an important role. Idle-Empire has its own cryptocurrency miner and you get paid for running it on your computer.
The average hashrate is currently 261 hashes per second. There's a calculator on the Idle-Empire website and it says that you earn 32,451 Points per month with that hashrate - that's $3.24. Note that this is just the current average, you might earn less or more depending on the GPU and CPU you have.
The issue with mining is that it takes your computer a lot of its CPU/GPU power, so you won't be able to use it for other stuff in the meantime. Your computer will also consume more electricity. I believe mining isn't worth it for most people anymore unless you don't pay for electricity.
I've used mining about 10 months ago or so and it was much more profitable at the time, I was making $0.80 - $0.90 per day. Haven't done it since the profitability went down, I think for most people it's only worth it now if you have free electricity.

Referrals

Idle-Empire has a simple referral system - you earn 20% of what your referrals earn through surveys/offers, servers, and mining. Here are the terms:
20% is pretty nice and I believe it can be a good passive income if you get active referrals.

Promotions

Promotions are basically offers from Idle-Empire. Most promotions are simple to complete.
There are some promotions that you can do on a daily basis just by pressing a button, that's pretty good. Also, I think it's worth to complete all the tasks that just require a few button clicks like verifying your email or following them on social media.
Here's a full list of all promotions:

Basic

Follow Social Media

Daily Tasks

Invite Friends

Create Content

Payout Methods

In this section, I'll quickly summarize the available payout methods.

PayPal

I'm sure everyone is familiar with PayPal. Idle-Empire sends USD to your PayPal account. There's a fee of $0.30 + 2.9%.

Gift Cards

They currently offer gift cards for the following platforms:

Cryptocurrencies

Idle-Empire has cryptocurrency payouts through Coinbase. The coins will be sent to your Coinbase account with zero fees. These currencies are supported:

Perfect Money

Perfect Money might be an alternative to PayPal for some people, especially when PayPal isn't available in your country. Perfect Money funds can be converted to Bitcoin, Skrill, Neteller, Payeer, Payoneer, and many others. Idle-Empire sends USD to your Perfect Money account.

BitSkins

BitSkins is a marketplace for Steam items, mainly for CS:GO and TF2 skins but many other games are supported too. Idle-Empire sends USD balance to your BitSkins account.

OPSkins

OPSkins is a marketplace for virtual and physical items. Idle-Empire sends Operation Points to your OPSkins account.

CSGOShop

CSGOShop is a marketplace similar to BitSkins but apparently, it has fewer users and supports fewer games. Idle-Empire sends USD balance to your CSGOShop account.

KeyJoker

KeyJoker seems to be a website where you can buy cheap indie Steam games. Idle-Empire sends credits to your KeyJoker account.

Boosters

Idle-Empire has "Boosters" that are randomly created on weekends (Saturday and Sunday). Boosters temporarily increase the earnings for one earning method, the boost can range from 1% to 100% and lasts a few hours. I've seen boosters for surveys/offers, videos, mining, and the game servers.

Conclusion

Idle-Empire can be a good alternative to traditional GPT sites for many users, especially since it doesn't have any country restrictions.
It has some unconventional earning methods like idling, mining, and some promotions but you'll also find the usual surveys, offers, and videos. Idle-Empire has many different offer walls, so that's nice if you like to grind.
The payout methods are primarily targeted towards gamers but they also have payouts through PayPal, Gift Cards, Cryptocurrencies, and Perfect Money. So I guess there's something for everybody.
The boosters on weekends are a good opportunity to complete some high paying offers and get a nice bonus on top. Coupons are also regularly posted on Twitter and the other social media channels and they can be redeemed in just a few seconds, so that's fast and easy.
I hope this extensive overview was helpful to some people! :)
submitted by z3rAHvzMxZ54fZmJmxaI to beermoney [link] [comments]

Video card prices and Cryptocurrency mining - what's going on?

In response to calls for a post addressing current GPU trends, this summary has been written up. It is neither exhaustive nor applicable in all regions, so be sure to research your own builds thoroughly.
Recently, you may have noticed discussion surrounding the current hike in the price of video cards. Or you may have found the price of certain cards (e.g. AMD's RX 570/580 and Nvidia's 1060/1070) higher than you expected.
So what's going on?
A sharp increase in cryptocurrency mining (the solving of complex mathematical problems that underlies the transactions for a given currency) has driven up demand for video cards, both new and used, as people invest in consumer hardware to get involved. Consequently, availability of cards is low, and prices are high.
As a very general idea, here's a basic rundown of recommended retail prices compared to current reseller prices on Amazon:
Card RRP (USD) Amazon
RX 570 4GB ~$179 ~$400+
RX 580 8GB ~$229 ~$500+
GTX 1060 6GB ~$249 ~$400+
GTX 1070 8GB ~$379 ~$500+
Why now?
There are a number of different cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin remains the largest, but increasing concern about transaction speed and cost has recently led to a rise in alternatives. The most prominent of these is Ethereum.
Ethereum is designed to be resistant to ASICs - chips designed specifically for cryptocurrency mining - which means that potential miners must stick to consumer video cards.
What happens next?
Eventually™, it is intended that Ethereum will switch from a proof of work (i.e. mining) to a proof of stake (based on possession of currency) system. Long story short, this will mean no more video card demand from Ethereum miners.
Unfortunately, there is no fixed date for when the switch is due to occur. There are rumours of plans to introduce cards aimed at cryptocurrency miners, which may help to lower prices of mainstream cards.
In the meantime:
Further reading:
ExtremeTech - Cryptocurrency Craze Sends GPU Prices Skyrocketing — Again
Tom's Hardware - GTX 1070 Prices Soar Alongside The 'Ethereum' Cryptocurrency
With this in mind, please refrain from creating new discussion threads about the effect of mining on the price of video cards, and include any questions as part of build help threads or in the daily simple questions post. Thanks!
submitted by CustardFilled to buildapc [link] [comments]

I literally have tens of thousands of dollars in top-shelf hardware, looking to repurpose some before selling on eBay to build a NAS system, possibly a dedicated firewall device as well. o_O

Q1) What will you be doing with this PC? Be as specific as possible, and include specific games or programs you will be using.**

A1) This will be a dedicated NAS system for my home network. As such, I'm looking to have it:

- Host ##TB's of 720, 1080 & up resolution Movies and TV Shows I'm about to begin ripping from a MASSIVE DVD & Blueray collection I have.

- My kids are big on Minecraft. I understand it's possible to host your own "worlds" (or whatever they call the maps you can build) on your own "server". I think it would be pretty neat to offer them (& their friends - if can be done 'safely/securely') their own partition on one of my NAS HDD's.

- I also have accounts with a couple diff VPN companies... I understand it's possible (?) to sync said VPN's with a NAS, this might be a more relative topic on the next point/purpose...

- I'd like to be able to remotely link to this NAS for when I travel overseas and want to stream at my temp location from my house/this NAS.
______________________
Q2) What is your maximum budget before rebates/shipping/taxes?**

* A2) Here's where I make matters more complicated than most others would... I've been an advocate for Bitcoin and crypto-currencies in general since 2013. I invested in a small mining outfit back in 2014 (strictly Bitcoin/ASIC's). One of my buddies is the President of a large-scale mining operation (foreign and domestic) and he convinced me to dabble in the GPU mining-space. I made my first hardware purchase in Q4, 2017 and launched a small-scale GPU-Farm in my house since then. I had the rigs mining up until Q3 of 2018 (not cost-efficient to keep on, especially living in SoFlo) and since then, the hardware's been collecting dust (& pissing off my family members since they lost access to 3X rooms in the house - I won't let anyone go near my gear). One of my New Years Resolutions for 2019 was to clear out the house of all my mining equipment so that's all about to go up on eBay. So "budget" is relative to whatever I "MUST" spend if I can't repurpose any of the parts I already have on hand for this build... (Anyone having something I "need" and is looking to barter for one of the items I'll list later on in here, LMK).
______________________
Q3) When do you plan on building/buying the PC? Note: beyond a week or two from today means any build you receive will be out of date when you want to buy.**

A3) IMMEDIATELY! :)
______________________
Q4) What, exactly, do you need included in the budget? (ToweOS/monitokeyboard/mouse/etc\)**

A4) Well I had a half-assed idea approximately 1 year ago that it might be wise to build a bunch of 'gaming rigs' to sell on eBay with my intended repurposed mining hardware so I went on a shopping spree for like 6 months. That said; I've got a plethora of various other components that aren't even unboxed yet. 90% of the items I've purchased for this additional project were items that were marked down via MIR (mail-in-rebates) & what-not...
AFAIK, there are only 3X items I absolutely do not have which I 'MUST' find. Those would be - 1) Motherboard which accepts "ECC RAM". 2) CPU for said MOBO. 3) Said "ECC RAM".\* 
______________________
Q5) Which country (and state/province) will you be purchasing the parts in? If you're in US, do you have access to a Microcenter location?**

A5) I'm located in Southwest Florida. No Microcenter's here. Best Buy is pretty much my only option although I am a member of Newegg, Amazon & Costco if that makes any difference?
______________________
Q6) If reusing any parts (including monitor(s)/keyboard/mouse/etc), what parts will you be reusing? Brands and models are appreciated.**

A6) In an attempt to better clean up this Q&A, I'm going to list the items I have on-hand at the end of this questionnaire in-case passers-by feel like this might be a TLDR.* (Scroll to the bottom & you'll see what I mean).
______________________
Q7) Will you be overclocking? If yes, are you interested in overclocking right away, or down the line? CPU and/or GPU?**

A7) I don't think that's necessary for my intended purpose although - I'm not against it if that helps & FWIW, I'm pretty skilled @ this task already (it's not rocket science).
______________________
Q8) Are there any specific features or items you want/need in the build? (ex: SSD, large amount of storage or a RAID setup, CUDA or OpenCL support, etc)**

A8) As stated in A4; ECC RAM is non-negotiable... RAID seems like a logical application here as well.

- This will predominantly be receiving commands from MacOS computers. I don't think that matters really but figured it couldn't hurt to let you guys know.\*

- I'd also be quite fond of implementing "PFSENSE" (or something of that caliber) applied to this system so I could give my Netgear Nighthawks less stress in that arena, plus my limited understanding of PFSENSE is that it's ability to act as a firewall runs circles around anything that comes with consumer-grade Wi-Fi routers (like my Nighthawks). Just the same, I'm open to building a second rig just for the firewall.\*

- Another desirable feature would be that it draws as little electricity from the wall as possible. (I'm EXTREMELY skilled in this arena. I have "Kill-A-Watts" to test/gauge on, as well as an intimate understanding of the differences between Silver, Gold, Platinum and Titanium rated PSU's. As well as having already measured each of the PSU's I have on-hand and taken note of the 'target TDP draw' ("Peak Power Efficiency Draw") each one offers when primed with X amount of GPU's when I used them for their original purpose.\*

- Last, but not least, sound (as in noise created from the rig). I'd like to prop this device up on my entertainment center in the living room. I've (almost) all of the top-shelf consumer grade products one could dream of regarding fans and other thermal-related artifacts.

- Almost forgot; this will be hosting to devices on the KODI platform (unless you guys have better alternative suggestions?)
______________________
Q9) Do you have any specific case preferences (Size like ITX/microATX/mid-towefull-tower, styles, colors, window or not, LED lighting, etc), or a particular color theme preference for the components?**

A9) Definitely! Desired theme would be WHITE. If that doesn't work for whatever reason, black or gray would suffice. Regarding "Case Size". Nah, that's not too important although I don't foresee a mini-ITX build making sense if I'm going to be cramming double digit amounts of TB in the system, Internal HDD's sounds better than a bunch of externals plugged in all the USB ports.
______________________
Q10) Do you need a copy of Windows included in the budget? If you do need one included, do you have a preference?**

A10) I don't know. If I do need a copy of Windows, I don't have one so that's something I'll have to consider I guess. I doubt that's a necessity though.
______________________
______________________
______________________
**Extra info or particulars:*\*

AND NOW TO THE FUN-STUFF... Here's a list of everything (PARTS PARTS PARTS) I have on-hand and ready to deploy into the wild &/or negotiate a trade/barter with:

CASES -
Corsair Carbide Series Air 540 Arctic White (Model# Crypto-Currency-9011048-WW) - (Probably my top pick for this build).
Cooler Master HAF XB EVO (This is probably my top 1st or 2nd pick for this build, the thing is a monster!).
Cooler Master Elite 130 - Mini ITX - Black
Cooler Master MasterBox 5 MID-Tower - Black & White
Raidmax Sigma-TWS - ATX - White
MasterBox Lite 5 - ATX - Black w/ diff. Colored accent attachments (included with purchase)
NZXT S340 Elite Matte White Steel/Tempered Glass Edition
EVGA DG-76 Alpine White - Mid Tower w/ window
EVGA DG-73 Black - Mid Tower w/ window (I have like 3 of these)

______________________
CPU's -
***7TH GEN OR BELOW INTEL's ("Code Name Class mentioned next to each one)**\*
Pentium G4400 (Skylake @54W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE"
Celeron G3930 (Kaby Lake @ 51W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC CAPABLE" :)
i5 6402P (Skylake @65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i5 6600k (Skylake @ 91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 6700 (Skylake @ 65W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(
i7 7700k (Kaby Lake @ 95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***8TH GEN INTEL's **\*
i3-8350K (Coffee Lake @91W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "ECC FRIENDLY" :)
I5-8600K (Coffee Lake @95W TDP) - Intel ARK states is "NOT ECC CAPABLE" :(


***AMD RYZEN's **\*
Ryzen 3 2200G
Ryzen 5 1600
Ryzen 7 1700X

______________________
MOTHERBOARDS -

***7TH GEN AND BELOW INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
MSI Z170A-SLI
ASUS PRIME Z270-A
ASUS PRIME Z270-P
ASUS PRIME Z270-K
EVGA Z270 Stinger
GIGABYTE GA-Z270XP-SLI
MSI B150M ARCTIC
MSI B250M MICRO ATX (PRO OPT. BOOST EDITION)

***8TH GEN INTEL BASED MOBO'S - **\*
EVGA Z370 FTW
GIGABYTE Z370XP SLI (Rev. 1.0)
MSI Z370 SLI PLUS


***AMD RYZEN BASED MOBO'S - **\*
ASUS ROG STRIX B350-F GAMING
MSI B350 TOMAHAWK
MSI X370 GAMING PRO
ASROCK AB350M PRO4
______________________


RAM -

Way too many to list, nothing but 4 & 8GB DDR4 sticks and unfortunately, none are ECC so it's not even worth mentioning/listing these unless someone reading this is willing to barter. At which time I'd be obliged to send an itemized list or see if I have what they're/you're specifically looking for.\*
______________________
THERMAL APPLICATIONS/FANS -
JUST FANS -
BeQuiet -
Pure Wings 2 (80mm)
Pure Wings 2 (120mm)
Pure Wings 2 (140mm)
Silent Wings 3 PWM (120mm)

NOCTUA -
PoopBrown - NF-A20 PWM (200mm) Specifically for the BIG "CoolerMaster HAF XB EVO" Case
GREY - NF-P12 Redux - 1700RPM (120mm) PWM
Corsair -
Air Series AF120LED (120mm)

CPU COOLING SYSTEMS -
NOCTUA -
NT-HH 1.4ml Thermal Compound
NH-D15 6 Heatpipe system (this thing is the tits)

EVGA (Extremely crappy coding in the software here, I'm like 99.99% these will be problematic if I were to try and use in any OS outside of Windows, because they barely ever work in the intended Windows as it is).
CLC 240 (240mm Water-cooled system
CRYORIG -
Cryorig C7 Cu (Low-Profile Copper Edition*)

A few other oversized CPU cooling systems I forget off the top of my head but a CPU cooler is a CPU cooler after comparing to the previous 3 models I mentioned.
I almost exclusively am using these amazing "Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pads" as an alternative to thermal paste for my CPU's. They're not cheap but they literally last forever.

NZXT - Sentry Mesh Fan Controller
______________________
POWER SUPPLIES (PSU's) -
BeQuiet 550W Straight Power 11 (GOLD)

EVGA -
750P2 (750W, Platinum)
850P2 (850W, Platinum)
750T2 (750W, TITANIUM - yeah baby, yeah)

ROSEWILL -
Quark 750W Platinum
Quark 650W Platinum

SEASONIC -
Focus 750W Platinum
______________________
STORAGE -
HGST Ultrastar 3TB - 64mb Cache - 7200RPM Sata III (3.5)
4X Samsung 860 EVO 500GB SSD's
2X Team Group L5 LITE 3D 2.5" SSD's 480GB
2X WD 10TB Essential EXT (I'm cool with shucking)
+ 6X various other external HDD's (from 4-8TB) - (Seagate, WD & G-Drives)
______________________

Other accessories worth mentioning -
PCI-E to 4X USB hub-adapter (I have a dozen or so of these - might not be sufficient enough &/or needed but again, 'worth mentioning' in case I somehow ever run out of SATA & USB ports and have extra external USB HDD's. Although, I'm sure there would be better suited components if I get to that point that probably won't cost all that much).
______________________
______________________
______________________
Needless to say, I have at least 1X of everything mentioned above. In most all cases, I have multiples of these items but obviously won't be needing 2X CPU's, Cases, etc...

Naturally, I have GPU's. Specifically;

At least 1X of every. Single. NVIDIA GTX 1070 TI (Yes, I have every variation of the 1070 ti made by MSI, EVGA and Zotac. The only brand I don't have is the Gigabyte line. My partners have terrible experience with those so I didn't even bother. I'm clearly not going to be needing a GPU for this build but again, I'm cool with discussing the idea of a barter if anyone reading this is in the market for one.

I also have some GTX 1080 TI's but those are already spoken for, sorry.

It's my understanding that select CPU's I have on this list are ECC Friendly and AFAIK, only 1 of my MOBO's claims to be ECC Friendly (The ASROCK AB350M PRO4), but for the life of me, I can't find any corresponding forums that confirm this and/or direct me to a listing where I can buy compatible RAM. Just the same, if I go w/ the ASROCK MOBO, that means I'd be using one of the Ryzens. Those are DEF. power hungry little buggers. Not a deal-breaker, just hoping to find something a little more conservative in terms of TDP.


In closing, I don't really need someone to hold my hand with the build part as much as figuring out which motherboard, CPU and RAM to get. Then I'm DEFINITELY going to need some guidance on what OS is best for my desired purpose. If building 2X Rigs makes sense, I'm totally open to that as well...
Rig 1 = EPIC NAS SYSTEM
Rig 2 = EPIC PFSENSE (or the like) DEDICATED FIREWALL

Oh, I almost forgot... The current routers I'm using are...
1X Netgear Nighthawk 6900P (Modem + Router)
1X Netgear Nighthawk X6S (AC 4000 I believe - Router dedicated towards my personal devices - no IoT &/or Guests allowed on this one)
1X TP-Link Archer C5 (Router). Total overkill after implementing the Nighthawks but this old beast somehow has the best range, plus it has 2X USB ports so for now, it's dedicated towards my IoT devices.
---- I also have a few other Wi-Fi routers (Apple Airport Extreme & some inferior Netgear's but I can only allocate so many WiFi Routers to so many WiFi channels w/out pissing off my neighbors) On that note, I have managed to convince my neighbors to let me in their house/WiFi configuration so we all have our hardware locked on specific, non-competing frequencies/channels so everyone's happy. :)


Please spare me the insults as I insulted myself throughout this entire venture. Part of why I did this was because when I was a kid, I used to fantasize about building a 'DREAM PC' but could never afford such. To compensate for this deficiency, I would actually print out the latest and greatest hardware components on a word document, print the lists up & tape to wall (for motivation). I was C++ certified at the age of 14 and built my first PC when I was 7. At the age of 15 I abandoned all hope in the sector and moved on to other aspirations. This entire ordeal was largely based off me finally fulfilling a childhood fantasy. On that note = mission accomplished. Now if I'm actually able to fulfill my desires on this post, I'm definitely going to feel less shitty about blowing so much money on all this stuff over the last couple years.

TIA for assisting in any way possible. Gotta love the internets!


THE END.
:)

EDIT/UPDATE (5 hours after OP) - My inbox is being inundated with various people asking for prices and other reasonable questions about my hardware being up for sale. Not to be redundant but rather to expound on my previous remarks about 'being interested in a bartetrade' with any of you here...

I did say I was going to sell my gear on eBay in the near future, I also said I wanted to trade/barter for anything relative to helping me accomplish my OP's mission(s). I'm not desperate for the $$$ but I'm also not one of those people that likes to rip other people off. That said; I value my time and money invested in this hardware and I'm only willing to unload it all once I've established I have ZERO need for any of it here in my home first. Hence my writing this lengthy thread in an attempt to repurpose at least a grand or two I've already spent.

One of the most commonly asked questions I anticipate receiving from interested bodies is going to be "How hard were you on your hardware?" Contrary to what anyone else would have probably done in my scenario which is say they were light on it whether they were or weren't, I documented my handling of the hardware, and have no problem sharing such documentation with verified, interested buyers (WHEN THE TIME COMES) to offer you guys peace of mind.

I have photo's and video's of the venture from A-Z. I am also obliged to provide (redacted) electricity bill statements where you can correlate my photo's (power draw on each rig), and also accurately deduct the excess power my house consumed with our other household appliances. Even taking into consideration how much (more) I spent in electricity from keeping my house at a constant, cool 70-72F year-round (via my Nest thermostat). Even without the rigs, I keep my AC @ 70 when I'm home and for the last 1.5-2 years, I just so happened to spend 85% of my time here at my house. When I would travel, I'd keep it at 72 for my wife & kids.
Additionally; I had each GPU 'custom' oveunderclocke'd (MSI Afterburner for all GPU's but the EVGA's).*
I doubt everyone reading this is aware so this is for those that don't.... EVGA had the brilliant idea of implementing what they call "ICX technology" in their latest NVIDIA GTX GPU's. The short(est) explanation of this "feature" goes as follows:

EVGA GPU's w/ "ICX 9 & above" have EXTRA HEAT/THERMAL SENSORS. Unlike every other GTX 1070 ti on the market, the one's with this feature actually have each of 2/2 on-board fans connected to individual thermal sensors. Which means - if you were to use the MSI Afterburner program on one of these EVGA's and create a custom fan curve for it, you'd only be able to get 1/2 of the fans to function the way intended. The other fan simply would not engage as the MSI Afterburner software wasn't designed/coded to recognize/ communicate with an added sensor (let alone sensor'S). This, in-turn, would likely result in whoever's using it the unintended way having a GPU defect on them within the first few months I'd imagine... Perhaps if they had the TDP power settings dumbed down as much as I did (60-63%), they might get a year or two out of it since it wouldn't run as near as hot, but I doubt any longer than that since cutting off 50% of the cooling system on one of these can't be ignored too long, surely capacitors would start to blow and who knows what else...
(Warning = RANT) Another interesting side-note about the EVGA's and their "Precision-X" OveUnderclocking software is that it's designed to only recognize 4X GPU's on a single system. For miners, that's just not cool. My favorite builds had 8X and for the motherboards that weren't capable of maintaining stable sessions on 8, I set up with 6X. Only my EVGA Rigs had 3 or 4X GPU's dedicated to a single motherboard. Furthermore, and as stated in an earlier paragraph, (& this is just my opinion) = EVGA SOFTWARE SUCKS! Precision X wasn't friendly with every motherboard/CPU I threw at it and their extension software for the CLC Close-Loop-Cooling/ CPU water-coolers simply didn't work on anything, even integrating into their own Precision-X software. The amount of time it took me to finally find compatible matches with that stuff was beyond maddening. (END RANT).
Which leads me to my other comments on the matter. That's what I had every single 1070 ti set at for TDP = 60-63%. Dropping the power load that much allowed me to bring down (on average) each 1070 ti to a constant 110-115W (mind you, this is only possible w/ "Titanium" rated PSU's, Platinum comes pretty damn close to the Titanium though) while mining Ethereum and was still able to maintain a bottom of 30 MH/s and a ceiling of 32 MH/s. Increasing the TDP to 80, 90, 100% or more only increased my hashrates (yields) negligibly, like 35-36 MH/s TOPS, which also meant each one was not only pulling 160-180W+ (Vs. the aforementioned 115'ish range), it also meant my rigs were creating a significantly greater amount of heat! Fortunately for the GPU's and my own personal habits, I live in South Florida where it's hot as balls typically, last winter was nothing like this one. Increasing my yields by 10-15% didn't justify increasing the heat production in my house by >30%, nor the added electricity costs from subjecting my AC handlers to that much of an extra work-load. For anyone reading this that doesn't know/understand what I'm talking about - after spending no less than 2-3 hours with each. and. every. one. I didn't play with the settings on just one and universally apply the settings to the rest. I found the 'prime' settings and documented them with a label-maker and notepad. Here's the math in a more transparent manner:

*** I NEVER LET MY GPU's BREACH 61C, EVER. Only my 8X GPU rigs saw 60-61 & it was the ones I had in the center of the build (naturally). I have REALLY high power fans (used on BTC ASIC MINERS) that were sucking air from those GPU's which was the only way I was able to obtain such stellar results while mining with them. **\*
Mining at "acceptable" heat temps (not acceptable to me, but most of the internet would disagree = 70C) and overclocking accordingly brings in X amount of yields per unit. =
'Tweaking' (underclocking) the GPU's to my parameters reduced my yield per unit from -10-15%, but it SAVED me well over 30-35% in direct electricity consumption, and an unknown amount of passive electricity consumption via creating approximately 20%+ less heat for my AC handler to combat.

I say all this extra stuff not just for anyone interested in mining with their GPU's, but really to answer (in-depth) the apparent questions you people are asking me in PM's. Something else that should help justify my claims of being so conservative should be the fact I only have/used "Platinum and Titanium" rated PSU's. Heat production, power efficiency and longevity of the hardware were ALWAYS my top priority.* . I truly thought Crypto would continue to gain and/or recover and bounce back faster than it did. If this project had maintained positive income for 12 months+, I'd have expanded one of our sites to also cater to GPU mining on a gnarly scale.

Once I have my NAS (& possibly 2nd rig for the firewall) successfully built, I'll be willing/able to entertain selling you guys some/all of the remaining hardware prior to launching on eBay. If there's something you're specifically looking for that I listed having, feel free to PM me with that/those specific item(s). Don't count on an immediate response but what you can count on is me honoring my word in offering whoever asks first right of refusal when the time comes for me to sell this stuff. Fortunately for me, PM's are time-stamped so that's how I'll gauge everyone's place in line. I hope this extra edit answers most of the questions you guys wanted to have answered and if not, sorry I guess. I'll do my best to bring light to anything I've missed out on after I realize whatever that error was/is. The only way anyone is getting first dibs on my hardware otherwise is if they either offer compelling insight into my original questions, or have something I need to trade w/.

THE END (Round#2)


submitted by Im-Ne-wHere to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

PC keeps shutting down when playing games or running benchmarks

Userbenchmark Test: https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/20687675
What is your parts list?
[PCPartPicker Part List](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/8Z3QzN)

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
**CPU** | [AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/jLF48d/amd-ryzen-5-2600-34ghz-6-core-processor-yd2600bbafbox) | $118.00 @ Amazon
**CPU Cooler** | [NZXT Kraken M22 Liquid CPU Cooler](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/fmx2FT/nzxt-kraken-m22-liquid-cpu-cooler-rl-krm22-01) | $79.99 @ Amazon
**Thermal Compound** | [ARCTIC MX4 4 g Thermal Paste](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/HBXfrH/arctic-cooling-thermal-paste-acmx4) | $8.49 @ OutletPC
**Motherboard** | [ASRock AB350M Pro4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/dWL7YJ/asrock-ab350m-pro4-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-ab350m-pro4) | $82.55 @ Amazon
**Memory** | [G.Skill Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/qjM323/gskill-trident-z-rgb-16gb-2-x-8gb-ddr3-3000-memory-f4-3000c16d-16gtzr) | $88.99 @ Newegg
**Storage** | [Kingston A400 120 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/2FDzK8/kingston-a400-120gb-25-solid-state-drive-sa400s37120g) | $21.99 @ Amazon
**Storage** | [Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/MwW9TW/western-digital-internal-hard-drive-wd10ezex) | $42.89 @ OutletPC
**Video Card** | [EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11 GB SC Black Edition Video Card](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/gwJkcf/evga-geforce-gtx-1080-ti-11gb-sc-black-edition-video-card-11g-p4-6393-kr) | $1199.99 @ Amazon
**Case** | [Phanteks Enthoo EVOLV TG MicroATX Mini Tower Case](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/VkZ2FT/phanteks-enthoo-evolv-tg-black-atx-mini-tower-case-ph-es314etg_bk) | $137.98 @ Newegg
**Power Supply** | [Enermax Platimax 1500 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/yjtCmG/enermax-power-supply-epm1500egt) |-
**Operating System** | [Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/MfH48d/microsoft-os-fqc08930) | $133.88 @ Amazon
**Monitor** | [Asus MG278Q 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/fMcMnQ/asus-monitor-mg278q) | $413.99 @ Amazon
| *Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts* |
| **Total** | **$2328.74**
| Generated by [PCPartPicker](https://pcpartpicker.com) 2019-10-05 09:55 EDT-0400 |

Describe your problem. List any error messages and symptoms. Be descriptive.
Whenever I am playing a game or running benchmarks my monitor will go to a no input screen after a few minutes of running. Sometimes it will freeze and I need to turn off the PSU to turn off the PC. When it shuts down I also hear a click sound, seems like it is coming from the psu, but I am not sure.
System
[ Name] Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power [ Guid] {331c3b3a-2005-44c2-ac5e-77220c37d6b4}
EventID 41
Version 6
Level 1
Task 63
Opcode 0
Keywords 0x8000400000000002
[ SystemTime] 2019-09-24T10:06:02.859840100Z
EventRecordID 848
Correlation
[ ProcessID] 4 [ ThreadID] 8
Channel System
Computer DESKTOP-FM7BHJL
[ UserID] S-1-5-18
List anything you've done in attempt to diagnose or fix the problem.
My gaming PC hasn't been working properly for like a year or more. A year or 2 ago I changed all my pc parts for new ones, so all the stuff in my computer is not more than 2 years old. Whenever I am playing a game or running benchmarks my monitor will go to a no input screen after a few minutes of running. I first thought it might be a GPU problem, so i RMA'd it. I have had about 5 different 1080Ti's that were all back from RMA. I have already brought my PC to a repair shop here, they also didnt know where the problem would be. They have checked all the parts, but they couldn't check the MB and CPU. So I send my MB to the place where i bought it from, they tested the MB for 4 hours in different benchmarks and nothing was wrong. I tried installing the gpu into my dad's pc, it still crashed, but after like half a day. I swapped the cpu for a Ryzen 3 1200, but still no luck. I've tried almost anything but nothing seems to work. Reinstalling and factory resetting also doesn't seem to fix the issue. When i unplug the pc and remover the psu cables from the GPU and plug Them back in a fee seconds later, my pc will take longer to crash.
I should add that the PSU is from an old bitcoin miner, i don't know if that has any negative effect on the system.
I hope this is enough info for you guys to help me out with, if any more info is needed just say so ,
thanks in advance
submitted by baslammers to pcgamingtechsupport [link] [comments]

How I turned $3500 into $15000 mining Cryptocurreny during the 2017 boom at 17 years old

First let's start at my first interaction with Bitcoin. Back in 2016, I was trading Minecraft accounts, you could find my story about that in one of my previous post. Long story short, a buyer had offered to buy one of my accounts for a fair amount of Bitcoin. I declined not knowing what that is and not caring.
Fast forward a little over a year, May 2017, I find out that you could actually mine cryptocurrency and profit from it. I talk to my techy uncle about it, he looks into it, decides to build a rig. This was easy for him since he had built computers before. Meanwhile summer, I am currently in New Zealand enjoying a vacation. When I come back, I look for ways to get this thing started. My uncle lives hundreds of miles away from me but luckily my mother knows someone who had mined crypto for a while. His name was CryptoNinja.
Crypto Ninja was a cool guy, he was a security analyst for a contracting firm. Knew lots about computers and programming. This was easy for him to grasp. When I met him, he had 2 rigs, one consisting of 6 1080ti's and the other with 4 1070's. If you don't know what these are, a 1080ti is or was the top of the line mining graphics card that you could get. Best of the best. Each costed about $550 at the time. 1070's market value were around $300-400 which at the time made mining extremely and easily profitable. This guy taught me how to do everything and when I say everything I mean it all. We started off with ordering the parts, He told me which parts were good for what and bad for this. We ordered from all over the place, Amazon, Newegg, and Microcenter. I gathered a list of parts, SSD, HD, GPU, CPU, MOTHERBOARD, RAM, ETC. All totaling out to about 3.5k. I had 6 1080's that I bought for around 500 each. This was the first time I've built a computer. I was a complete noob. He guided me through the process of starting with software, finding a mining pool, starting up your operating system, and taught me how to manage and maintain the mining program, hardware, and external factors. The whole process of ordering/shipping was about a week, building the computer took about 3 days, setting up programs took about a day. After that, boom. I'm running the mining program with a pool on Zcash. A pool is pretty much a group of miners collectively putting their computing force to get more results.
Meanwhile, I'm a senior in High School, bringing my macbook to school everyday to check up on the rig through Remote Desktop after every class. All of this was occuring around Sept. 2017 where BTC was going up up. And I'm talking around 10k. Boy was I racking in a ton of Zcash. Everytime after I'd rack in a good amount, I'd transfer my Zcash directly into my Bittrex account which then I traded for bitcoin and altcoins like OMG, OmiseGO, NEM, ETC. But there was this one time when I got on Bittrex at school and I saw Zcash had mysteriously went up to $400 in 10-15 minutes, the timing had never been better. Guess what I did? Sell all my Zcash yep. Made a good amount of money off of that. Every coin was going up. I continuously made successful trades because prices were going up. I felt like the man. By the time December came around, I had 10k worth of crypto in my exchange account. I know, dumb to keep it in the exchange account but hey I did it. I was the only one mining crypto at my school and people knew me for that but they didn't know how much I made, I joined the investment club. They talked about investing in crypto, what is it? is it safe? they wanted me to speak, i didn't out of fear. They all thought it was a fad. These were traditional stock trader type kids.
It was hard for them to understand the concept but by the time they wanted in it was too late. I already cashed out $12.2k. Bitcoin was like 18k at the time and I needed somewhere else to put my money. I decided to buy a whole new gaming setup. Which costed me around 2.5k and a new desk and cool random stuff for my room which costed a few hundred. I spent a lil more money than I wanted to but it was okay. then it came time to sell my mining rig, Bitcoin was falling. People were freaking out. I was out already. The prices of GPU's multiplied by 2. This was insane. I sold my gpu's on ebay for 3k and gave the rest of parts to either friends and kept RAM for myself. At the time, I was still 17. People would look at my computer and say what is that? Oh Bitcoin? That's Stupid. Welp. Not anymore words.
What am I doing now? Well I invested in some Quantum Computer Stocks, put some back into Crypto, and put some money into OG accounts which I have a whole story on on a previous reddit post. I learned a lot from this and look back smiling.
submitted by knicklol to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Searching for the Unicorn Cryptocurrency

Searching for the Unicorn Cryptocurrency
For someone first starting out as a cryptocurrency investor, finding a trustworthy manual for screening a cryptocurrency’s merits is nonexistent as we are still in the early, Wild West days of the cryptocurrency market. One would need to become deeply familiar with the inner workings of blockchain to be able to perform the bare minimum due diligence.
One might believe, over time, that finding the perfect cryptocurrency may be nothing short of futile. If a cryptocurrency purports infinite scalability, then it is probably either lightweight with limited features or it is highly centralized among a limited number of nodes that perform consensus services especially Proof of Stake or Delegated Proof of Stake. Similarly, a cryptocurrency that purports comprehensive privacy may have technical obstacles to overcome if it aims to expand its applications such as in smart contracts. The bottom line is that it is extremely difficult for a cryptocurrency to have all important features jam-packed into itself.
The cryptocurrency space is stuck in the era of the “dial-up internet” in a manner of speaking. Currently blockchain can’t scale – not without certain tradeoffs – and it hasn’t fully resolved certain intractable issues such as user-unfriendly long addresses and how the blockchain size is forever increasing to name two.
In other words, we haven’t found the ultimate cryptocurrency. That is, we haven’t found the mystical unicorn cryptocurrency that ushers the era of decentralization while eschewing all the limitations of traditional blockchain systems.
“But wait – what about Ethereum once it implements sharding?”
“Wouldn’t IOTA be able to scale infinitely with smart contracts through its Qubic offering?”
“Isn’t Dash capable of having privacy, smart contracts, and instantaneous transactions?”
Those thoughts and comments may come from cryptocurrency investors who have done their research. It is natural for the informed investors to invest in projects that are believed to bring cutting edge technological transformation to blockchain. Sooner or later, the sinking realization will hit that any variation of the current blockchain technology will always likely have certain limitations.
Let us pretend that there indeed exists a unicorn cryptocurrency somewhere that may or may not be here yet. What would it look like, exactly? Let us set the 5 criteria of the unicorn cryptocurrency:
Unicorn Criteria
(1) Perfectly solves the blockchain trilemma:
o Infinite scalability
o Full security
o Full decentralization
(2) Zero or minimal transaction fee
(3) Full privacy
(4) Full smart contract capabilities
(5) Fair distribution and fair governance
For each of the above 5 criteria, there would not be any middle ground. For example, a cryptocurrency with just an in-protocol mixer would not be considered as having full privacy. As another example, an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) may possibly violate criterion (5) since with an ICO the distribution and governance are often heavily favored towards an oligarchy – this in turn would defy the spirit of decentralization that Bitcoin was found on.
There is no cryptocurrency currently that fits the above profile of the unicorn cryptocurrency. Let us examine an arbitrary list of highly hyped cryptocurrencies that meet the above list at least partially. The following list is by no means comprehensive but may be a sufficient sampling of various blockchain implementations:
Bitcoin (BTC)
Bitcoin is the very first and the best known cryptocurrency that started it all. While Bitcoin is generally considered extremely secure, it suffers from mining centralization to a degree. Bitcoin is not anonymous, lacks smart contracts, and most worrisomely, can only do about 7 transactions per seconds (TPS). Bitcoin is not the unicorn notwithstanding all the Bitcoin maximalists.
Ethereum (ETH)
Ethereum is widely considered the gold standard of smart contracts aside from its scalability problem. Sharding as part of Casper’s release is generally considered to be the solution to Ethereum’s scalability problem.
The goal of sharding is to split up validating responsibilities among various groups or shards. Ethereum’s sharding comes down to duplicating the existing blockchain architecture and sharing a token. This does not solve the core issue and simply kicks the can further down the road. After all, full nodes still need to exist one way or another.
Ethereum’s blockchain size problem is also an issue as will be explained more later in this article.
As a result, Ethereum is not the unicorn due to its incomplete approach to scalability and, to a degree, security.
Dash
Dash’s masternodes are widely considered to be centralized due to their high funding requirements, and there are accounts of a pre-mine in the beginning. Dash is not the unicorn due to its questionable decentralization.
Nano
Nano boasts rightfully for its instant, free transactions. But it lacks smart contracts and privacy, and it may be exposed to well orchestrated DDOS attacks. Therefore, it goes without saying that Nano is not the unicorn.
EOS
While EOS claims to execute millions of transactions per seconds, a quick glance reveals centralized parameters with 21 nodes and a questionable governance system. Therefore, EOS fails to achieve the unicorn status.
Monero (XMR)
One of the best known and respected privacy coins, Monero lacks smart contracts and may fall short of infinite scalability due to CryptoNote’s design. The unicorn rank is out of Monero’s reach.
IOTA
IOTA’s scalability is based on the number of transactions the network processes, and so its supposedly infinite scalability would fluctuate and is subject to the whims of the underlying transactions. While IOTA’s scalability approach is innovative and may work in the long term, it should be reminded that the unicorn cryptocurrency has no middle ground. The unicorn cryptocurrency would be expected to scale infinitely on a consistent basis from the beginning.
In addition, IOTA’s Masked Authenticated Messaging (MAM) feature does not bring privacy to the masses in a highly convenient manner. Consequently, the unicorn is not found with IOTA.

PascalCoin as a Candidate for the Unicorn Cryptocurrency
Please allow me to present a candidate for the cryptocurrency unicorn: PascalCoin.
According to the website, PascalCoin claims the following:
“PascalCoin is an instant, zero-fee, infinitely scalable, and decentralized cryptocurrency with advanced privacy and smart contract capabilities. Enabled by the SafeBox technology to become the world’s first blockchain independent of historical operations, PascalCoin possesses unlimited potential.”
The above summary is a mouthful to be sure, but let’s take a deep dive on how PascalCoin innovates with the SafeBox and more. Before we do this, I encourage you to first become acquainted with PascalCoin by watching the following video introduction:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=F25UU-0W9Dk
The rest of this section will be split into 10 parts in order to illustrate most of the notable features of PascalCoin. Naturally, let’s start off with the SafeBox.
Part #1: The SafeBox
Unlike traditional UTXO-based cryptocurrencies in which the blockchain records the specifics of each transaction (address, sender address, amount of funds transferred, etc.), the blockchain in PascalCoin is only used to mutate the SafeBox. The SafeBox is a separate but equivalent cryptographic data structure that snapshots account balances. PascalCoin’s blockchain is comparable to a machine that feeds the most important data – namely, the state of an account – into the SafeBox. Any node can still independently compute and verify the cumulative Proof-of-Work required to construct the SafeBox.
The PascalCoin whitepaper elegantly highlights the unique historical independence that the SafeBox possesses:
“While there are approaches that cryptocurrencies could use such as pruning, warp-sync, "finality checkpoints", UTXO-snapshotting, etc, there is a fundamental difference with PascalCoin. Their new nodes can only prove they are on most-work-chain using the infinite history whereas in PascalCoin, new nodes can prove they are on the most-work chain without the infinite history.”
Some cryptocurrency old-timers might instinctively balk at the idea of full nodes eschewing the entire history for security, but such a reaction would showcase a lack of understanding on what the SafeBox really does.
A concrete example would go a long way to best illustrate what the SafeBox does. Let’s say I input the following operations in my calculator:
5 * 5 – 10 / 2 + 5
It does not take a genius to calculate the answer, 25. Now, the expression “5 \ 5 – 10 / 2 + 5”* would be forever imbued on a traditional blockchain’s history. But the SafeBox begs to differ. It says that the expression “5 \ 5 – 10 / 2 + 5”* should instead be simply “25” so as preserve simplicity, time, and space. In other words, the SafeBox simply preserves the account balance.
But some might still be unsatisfied and claim that if one cannot trace the series of operations (transactions) that lead to the final number (balance) of 25, the blockchain is inherently insecure.
Here are four important security aspects of the SafeBox that some people fail to realize:
(1) SafeBox Follows the Longest Chain of Proof-of-Work
The SafeBox mutates itself per 100 blocks. Each new SafeBox mutation must reference both to the previous SafeBox mutation and the preceding 100 blocks in order to be valid, and the resultant hash of the new mutated SafeBox must then be referenced by each of the new subsequent blocks, and the process repeats itself forever.
The fact that each new SafeBox mutation must reference to the previous SafeBox mutation is comparable to relying on the entire history. This is because the previous SafeBox mutation encapsulates the result of cumulative entire history except for the 100 blocks which is why each new SafeBox mutation requires both the previous SafeBox mutation and the preceding 100 blocks.
So in a sense, there is a single interconnected chain of inflows and outflows, supported by Byzantine Proof-of-Work consensus, instead of the entire history of transactions.
More concretely, the SafeBox follows the path of the longest chain of Proof-of-Work simply by design, and is thus cryptographically equivalent to the entire history even without tracing specific operations in the past. If the chain is rolled back with a 51% attack, only the attacker’s own account(s) in the SafeBox can be manipulated as is explained in the next part.
(2) A 51% Attack on PascalCoin Functions the Same as Others
A 51% attack on PascalCoin would work in a similar way as with other Proof-of-Work cryptocurrencies. An attacker cannot modify a transaction in the past without affecting the current SafeBox hash which is accepted by all honest nodes.
Someone might claim that if you roll back all the current blocks plus the 100 blocks prior to the SafeBox’s mutation, one could create a forged SafeBox with different balances for all accounts. This would be incorrect as one would be able to manipulate only his or her own account(s) in the SafeBox with a 51% attack – just as is the case with other UTXO cryptocurrencies. The SafeBox stores the balances of all accounts which are in turn irreversibly linked only to their respective owners’ private keys.
(3) One Could Preserve the Entire History of the PascalCoin Blockchain
No blockchain data in PascalCoin is ever deleted even in the presence of the SafeBox. Since the SafeBox is cryptographically equivalent to a full node with the entire history as explained above, PascalCoin full nodes are not expected to contain infinite history. But for whatever reason(s) one may have, one could still keep all the PascalCoin blockchain history as well along with the SafeBox as an option even though it would be redundant.
Without storing the entire history of the PascalCoin blockchain, you can still trace the specific operations of the 100 blocks prior to when the SafeBox absorbs and reflects the net result (a single balance for each account) from those 100 blocks. But if you’re interested in tracing operations over a longer period in the past – as redundant as that may be – you’d have the option to do so by storing the entire history of the PascalCoin blockchain.
(4) The SafeBox is Equivalent to the Entire Blockchain History
Some skeptics may ask this question: “What if the SafeBox is forever lost? How would you be able to verify your accounts?” Asking this question is tantamount to asking to what would happen to Bitcoin if all of its entire history was erased. The result would be chaos, of course, but the SafeBox is still in line with the general security model of a traditional blockchain with respect to black swans.
Now that we know the security of the SafeBox is not compromised, what are the implications of this new blockchain paradigm? A colorful illustration as follows still wouldn’t do justice to the subtle revolution that the SafeBox ushers. The automobiles we see on the street are the cookie-and-butter representation of traditional blockchain systems. The SafeBox, on the other hand, supercharges those traditional cars to become the Transformers from Michael Bay’s films.
The SafeBox is an entirely different blockchain architecture that is impressive in its simplicity and ingenuity. The SafeBox’s design is only the opening act for PascalCoin’s vast nuclear arsenal. If the above was all that PascalCoin offers, it still wouldn’t come close to achieving the unicorn status but luckily, we have just scratched the surface. Please keep on reading on if you want to learn how PascalCoin is going to shatter the cryptocurrency industry into pieces. Buckle down as this is going to be a long read as we explore further about the SafeBox’s implications.
Part #2: 0-Confirmation Transactions
To begin, 0-confirmation transactions are secure in PascalCoin thanks to the SafeBox.
The following paraphrases an explanation of PascalCoin’s 0-confirmations from the whitepaper:
“Since PascalCoin is not a UTXO-based currency but rather a State-based currency thanks to the SafeBox, the security guarantee of 0-confirmation transactions are much stronger than in UTXO-based currencies. For example, in Bitcoin if a merchant accepts a 0-confirmation transaction for a coffee, the buyer can simply roll that transaction back after receiving the coffee but before the transaction is confirmed in a block. The way the buyer does this is by re-spending those UTXOs to himself in a new transaction (with a higher fee) thus invalidating them for the merchant. In PascalCoin, this is virtually impossible since the buyer's transaction to the merchant is simply a delta-operation to debit/credit a quantity from/to accounts respectively. The buyer is unable to erase or pre-empt this two-sided, debit/credit-based transaction from the network’s pending pool until it either enters a block for confirmation or is discarded with respect to both sender and receiver ends. If the buyer tries to double-spend the coffee funds after receiving the coffee but before they clear, the double-spend transaction will not propagate the network since nodes cannot propagate a double-spending transaction thanks to the debit/credit nature of the transaction. A UTXO-based transaction is initially one-sided before confirmation and therefore is more exposed to one-sided malicious schemes of double spending.”
Phew, that explanation was technical but it had to be done. In summary, PascalCoin possesses the only secure 0-confirmation transactions in the cryptocurrency industry, and it goes without saying that this means PascalCoin is extremely fast. In fact, PascalCoin is capable of 72,000 TPS even prior to any additional extensive optimizations down the road. In other words, PascalCoin is as instant as it gets and gives Nano a run for its money.
Part #3: Zero Fee
Let’s circle back to our discussion of PascalCoin’s 0-confirmation capability. Here’s a little fun magical twist to PascalCoin’s 0-confirmation magic: 0-confirmation transactions are zero-fee. As in you don’t pay a single cent in fee for each 0-confirmation! There is just a tiny downside: if you create a second transaction in a 5-minute block window then you’d need to pay a minimal fee. Imagine using Nano but with a significantly stronger anti-DDOS protection for spam! But there shouldn’t be any complaint as this fee would amount to 0.0001 Pascal or $0.00002 based on the current price of a Pascal at the time of this writing.
So, how come the fee for blazingly fast transactions is nonexistent? This is where the magic of the SafeBox arises in three ways:
(1) PascalCoin possesses the secure 0-confirmation feature as discussed above that enables this speed.
(2) There is no fee bidding competition of transaction priority typical in UTXO cryptocurrencies since, once again, PascalCoin operates on secure 0-confirmations.
(3) There is no fee incentive needed to run full nodes on behalf of the network’s security beyond the consensus rewards.
Part #4: Blockchain Size
Let’s expand more on the third point above, using Ethereum as an example. Since Ethereum’s launch in 2015, its full blockchain size is currently around 2 TB, give or take, but let’s just say its blockchain size is 100 GB for now to avoid offending the Ethereum elitists who insist there are different types of full nodes that are lighter. Whoever runs Ethereum’s full nodes would expect storage fees on top of the typical consensus fees as it takes significant resources to shoulder Ethereum’s full blockchain size and in turn secure the network. What if I told you that PascalCoin’s full blockchain size will never exceed few GBs after thousands of years? That is just what the SafeBox enables PascalCoin to do so. It is estimated that by 2072, PascalCoin’s full nodes will only be 6 GB which is low enough not to warrant any fee incentives for hosting full nodes. Remember, the SafeBox is an ultra-light cryptographic data structure that is cryptographically equivalent to a blockchain with the entire transaction history. In other words, the SafeBox is a compact spreadsheet of all account balances that functions as PascalCoin’s full node!
Not only does the SafeBox’s infinitesimal memory size helps to reduce transaction fees by phasing out any storage fees, but it also paves the way for true decentralization. It would be trivial for every PascalCoin user to opt a full node in the form of a wallet. This is extreme decentralization at its finest since the majority of users of other cryptocurrencies ditch full nodes due to their burdensome sizes. It is naïve to believe that storage costs would reduce enough to the point where hosting full nodes are trivial. Take a look at the following chart outlining the trend of storage cost.

* https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-cost-per-gigabyte/
As we can see, storage costs continue to decrease but the descent is slowing down as is the norm with technological improvements. In the meantime, blockchain sizes of other cryptocurrencies are increasing linearly or, in the case of smart contract engines like Ethereum, parabolically. Imagine a cryptocurrency smart contract engine like Ethereum garnering worldwide adoption; how do you think Ethereum’s size would look like in the far future based on the following chart?


https://i.redd.it/k57nimdjmo621.png

Ethereum’s future blockchain size is not looking pretty in terms of sustainable security. Sharding is not a fix for this issue since there still needs to be full nodes but that is a different topic for another time.
It is astonishing that the cryptocurrency community as a whole has passively accepted this forever-expanding-blockchain-size problem as an inescapable fate.
PascalCoin is the only cryptocurrency that has fully escaped the death vortex of forever expanding blockchain size. Its blockchain size wouldn’t exceed 10 GB even after many hundreds of years of worldwide adoption. Ethereum’s blockchain size after hundreds of years of worldwide adoption would make fine comedy.
Part #5: Simple, Short, and Ordinal Addresses
Remember how the SafeBox works by snapshotting all account balances? As it turns out, the account address system is almost as cool as the SafeBox itself.
Imagine yourself in this situation: on a very hot and sunny day, you’re wandering down the street across from your house and ran into a lemonade stand – the old-fashioned kind without any QR code or credit card terminal. The kid across you is selling a lemonade cup for 1 Pascal with a poster outlining the payment address as 5471-55. You flip out your phone and click “Send” with 1 Pascal to the address 5471-55; viola, exactly one second later you’re drinking your lemonade without paying a cent for the transaction fee!
The last thing one wants to do is to figure out how to copy/paste to, say, the following address 1BoatSLRHtKNngkdXEeobR76b53LETtpyT on the spot wouldn’t it? Gone are the obnoxiously long addresses that plague all cryptocurrencies. The days of those unreadable addresses will be long gone – it has to be if blockchain is to innovate itself for the general public. EOS has a similar feature for readable addresses but in a very limited manner in comparison, and nicknames attached to addresses in GUIs don’t count since blockchain-wide compatibility wouldn’t hold.
Not only does PascalCoin has the neat feature of having addresses (called PASAs) that amount to up to 6 or 7 digits, but PascalCoin can also incorporate in-protocol address naming as opposed to GUI address nicknames. Suppose I want to order something from Amazon using Pascal; I simply search the word “Amazon” then the corresponding account number shows up. Pretty neat, right?
The astute reader may gather that PascalCoin’s address system makes it necessary to commoditize addresses, and he/she would be correct. Some view this as a weakness; part #10 later in this segment addresses this incorrect perception.
Part #6: Privacy
As if the above wasn’t enough, here’s another secret that PascalCoin has: it is a full-blown privacy coin. It uses two separate foundations to achieve comprehensive anonymity: in-protocol mixer for transfer amounts and zn-SNARKs for private balances. The former has been implemented and the latter is on the roadmap. Both the 0-confirmation transaction and the negligible transaction fee would make PascalCoin the most scalable privacy coin of any other cryptocurrencies pending the zk-SNARKs implementation.
Part #7: Smart Contracts
Next, PascalCoin will take smart contracts to the next level with a layer-2 overlay consensus system that pioneers sidechains and other smart contract implementations.
In formal terms, this layer-2 architecture will facilitate the transfer of data between PASAs which in turn allows clean enveloping of layer-2 protocols inside layer-1 much in the same way that HTTP lives inside TCP.
To summarize:
· The layer-2 consensus method is separate from the layer-1 Proof-of-Work. This layer-2 consensus method is independent and flexible. A sidechain – based on a single encompassing PASA – could apply Proof-of-Stake (POS), Delegated Proof-of-Stake (DPOS), or Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) as the consensus system of its choice.
· Such a layer-2 smart contract platform can be written in any languages.
· Layer-2 sidechains will also provide very strong anonymity since funds are all pooled and keys are not used to unlock them.
· This layer-2 architecture is ingenious in which the computation is separate from layer-2 consensus, in effect removing any bottleneck.
· Horizontal scaling exists in this paradigm as there is no interdependence between smart contracts and states are not managed by slow sidechains.
· Speed and scalability are fully independent of PascalCoin.
One would be able to run the entire global financial system on PascalCoin’s infinitely scalable smart contract platform and it would still scale infinitely. In fact, this layer-2 architecture would be exponentially faster than Ethereum even after its sharding is implemented.
All this is the main focus of PascalCoin’s upcoming version 5 in 2019. A whitepaper add-on for this major upgrade will be released in early 2019.
Part #8: RandomHash Algorithm
Surely there must be some tradeoffs to PascalCoin’s impressive capabilities, you might be asking yourself. One might bring up the fact that PascalCoin’s layer-1 is based on Proof-of-Work and is thus susceptible to mining centralization. This would be a fallacy as PascalCoin has pioneered the very first true ASIC, GPU, and dual-mining resistant algorithm known as RandomHash that obliterates anything that is not CPU based and gives all the power back to solo miners.
Here is the official description of RandomHash:
“RandomHash is a high-level cryptographic hash algorithm that combines other well-known hash primitives in a highly serial manner. The distinguishing feature is that calculations for a nonce are dependent on partial calculations of other nonces, selected at random. This allows a serial hasher (CPU) to re-use these partial calculations in subsequent mining saving 50% or more of the work-load. Parallel hashers (GPU) cannot benefit from this optimization since the optimal nonce-set cannot be pre-calculated as it is determined on-the-fly. As a result, parallel hashers (GPU) are required to perform the full workload for every nonce. Also, the algorithm results in 10x memory bloat for a parallel implementation. In addition to its serial nature, it is branch-heavy and recursive making in optimal for CPU-only mining.”
One might be understandably skeptical of any Proof-of-Work algorithm that solves ASIC and GPU centralization once for all because there have been countless proposals being thrown around for various algorithms since the dawn of Bitcoin. Is RandomHash truly the ASIC & GPU killer that it claims to be?
Herman Schoenfeld, the inventor behind RandomHash, described his algorithm in the following:
“RandomHash offers endless ASIC-design breaking surface due to its use of recursion, hash algo selection, memory hardness and random number generation.
For example, changing how round hash selection is made and/or random number generator algo and/or checksum algo and/or their sequencing will totally break an ASIC design. Conceptually if you can significantly change the structure of the output assembly whilst keeping the high-level algorithm as invariant as possible, the ASIC design will necessarily require proportional restructuring. This results from the fact that ASIC designs mirror the ASM of the algorithm rather than the algorithm itself.”
Polyminer1 (pseudonym), one of the members of the PascalCoin core team who developed RHMiner (official software for mining RandomHash), claimed as follows:
“The design of RandomHash is, to my experience, a genuine innovation. I’ve been 30 years in the field. I’ve rarely been surprised by anything. RandomHash was one of my rare surprises. It’s elegant, simple, and achieves resistance in all fronts.”
PascalCoin may have been the first party to achieve the race of what could possibly be described as the “God algorithm” for Proof-of-Work cryptocurrencies. Look no further than one of Monero’s core developers since 2015, Howard Chu. In September 2018, Howard declared that he has found a solution, called RandomJS, to permanently keep ASICs off the network without repetitive algorithm changes. This solution actually closely mirrors RandomHash’s algorithm. Discussing about his algorithm, Howard asserted that “RandomJS is coming at the problem from a direction that nobody else is.”
Link to Howard Chu’s article on RandomJS:
https://www.coindesk.com/one-musicians-creative-solution-to-drive-asics-off-monero
Yet when Herman was asked about Howard’s approach, he responded:
“Yes, looks like it may work although using Javascript was a bit much. They should’ve just used an assembly subset and generated random ASM programs. In a way, RandomHash does this with its repeated use of random mem-transforms during expansion phase.”
In the end, PascalCoin may have successfully implemented the most revolutionary Proof-of-Work algorithm, one that eclipses Howard’s burgeoning vision, to date that almost nobody knows about. To learn more about RandomHash, refer to the following resources:
RandomHash whitepaper:
https://www.pascalcoin.org/storage/whitepapers/RandomHash_Whitepaper.pdf
Technical proposal for RandomHash:
https://github.com/PascalCoin/PascalCoin/blob/mastePIP/PIP-0009.md
Someone might claim that PascalCoin still suffers from mining centralization after RandomHash, and this is somewhat misleading as will be explained in part #10.
Part #9: Fair Distribution and Governance
Not only does PascalCoin rest on superior technology, but it also has its roots in the correct philosophy of decentralized distribution and governance. There was no ICO or pre-mine, and the developer fund exists as a percentage of mining rewards as voted by the community. This developer fund is 100% governed by a decentralized autonomous organization – currently facilitated by the PascalCoin Foundation – that will eventually be transformed into an autonomous smart contract platform. Not only is the developer fund voted upon by the community, but PascalCoin’s development roadmap is also voted upon the community via the Protocol Improvement Proposals (PIPs).
This decentralized governance also serves an important benefit as a powerful deterrent to unseemly fork wars that befall many cryptocurrencies.
Part #10: Common Misconceptions of PascalCoin
“The branding is terrible”
PascalCoin is currently working very hard on its image and is preparing for several branding and marketing initiatives in the short term. For example, two of the core developers of the PascalCoin recently interviewed with the Fox Business Network. A YouTube replay of this interview will be heavily promoted.
Some people object to the name PascalCoin. First, it’s worth noting that PascalCoin is the name of the project while Pascal is the name of the underlying currency. Secondly, Google and YouTube received excessive criticisms back then in the beginning with their name choices. Look at where those companies are nowadays – surely a somewhat similar situation faces PascalCoin until the name’s familiarity percolates into the public.
“The wallet GUI is terrible”
As the team is run by a small yet extremely dedicated developers, multiple priorities can be challenging to juggle. The lack of funding through an ICO or a pre-mine also makes it challenging to accelerate development. The top priority of the core developers is to continue developing full-time on the groundbreaking technology that PascalCoin offers. In the meantime, an updated and user-friendly wallet GUI has been worked upon for some time and will be released in due time. Rome wasn’t built in one day.
“One would need to purchase a PASA in the first place”
This is a complicated topic since PASAs need to be commoditized by the SafeBox’s design, meaning that PASAs cannot be obtained at no charge to prevent systematic abuse. This raises two seemingly valid concerns:
· As a chicken and egg problem, how would one purchase a PASA using Pascal in the first place if one cannot obtain Pascal without a PASA?
· How would the price of PASAs stay low and affordable in the face of significant demand?
With regards to the chicken and egg problem, there are many ways – some finished and some unfinished – to obtain your first PASA as explained on the “Get Started” page on the PascalCoin website:
https://www.pascalcoin.org/get_started
More importantly, however, is the fact that there are few methods that can get your first PASA for free. The team will also release another method soon in which you could obtain your first PASA for free via a single SMS message. This would probably become by far the simplest and the easiest way to obtain your first PASA for free. There will be more new ways to easily obtain your first PASA for free down the road.
What about ensuring the PASA market at large remains inexpensive and affordable following your first (and probably free) PASA acquisition? This would be achieved in two ways:
· Decentralized governance of the PASA economics per the explanation in the FAQ section on the bottom of the PascalCoin website (https://www.pascalcoin.org/)
· Unlimited and free pseudo-PASAs based on layer-2 in the next version release.
“PascalCoin is still centralized after the release of RandomHash”
Did the implementation of RandomHash from version 4 live up to its promise?
The official goals of RandomHash were as follow:
(1) Implement a GPU & ASIC resistant hash algorithm
(2) Eliminate dual mining
The two goals above were achieved by every possible measure.
Yet a mining pool, Nanopool, was able to regain its hash majority after a significant but a temporary dip.
The official conclusion is that, from a probabilistic viewpoint, solo miners are more profitable than pool miners. However, pool mining is enticing for solo miners who 1) have limited hardware as it ensures a steady income instead of highly profitable but probabilistic income via solo mining, and 2) who prefer convenient software and/or GUI.
What is the next step, then? While the barrier of entry for solo miners has successfully been put down, additional work needs to be done. The PascalCoin team and the community are earnestly investigating additional steps to improve mining decentralization with respect to pool mining specifically to add on top of RandomHash’s successful elimination of GPU, ASIC, and dual-mining dominance.
It is likely that the PascalCoin community will promote the following two initiatives in the near future:
(1) Establish a community-driven, nonprofit mining pool with attractive incentives.
(2) Optimize RHMiner, PascalCoin’s official solo mining software, for performance upgrades.
A single pool dominance is likely short lived once more options emerge for individual CPU miners who want to avoid solo mining for whatever reason(s).
Let us use Bitcoin as an example. Bitcoin mining is dominated by ASICs and mining pools but no single pool is – at the time of this writing – even close on obtaining the hash majority. With CPU solo mining being a feasible option in conjunction with ASIC and GPU mining eradication with RandomHash, the future hash rate distribution of PascalCoin would be far more promising than Bitcoin’s hash rate distribution.
PascalCoin is the Unicorn Cryptocurrency
If you’ve read this far, let’s cut straight to the point: PascalCoin IS the unicorn cryptocurrency.
It is worth noting that PascalCoin is still a young cryptocurrency as it was launched at the end of 2016. This means that many features are still work in progress such as zn-SNARKs, smart contracts, and pool decentralization to name few. However, it appears that all of the unicorn criteria are within PascalCoin’s reach once PascalCoin’s technical roadmap is mostly completed.
Based on this expository on PascalCoin’s technology, there is every reason to believe that PascalCoin is the unicorn cryptocurrency. PascalCoin also solves two fundamental blockchain problems beyond the unicorn criteria that were previously considered unsolvable: blockchain size and simple address system. The SafeBox pushes PascalCoin to the forefront of cryptocurrency zeitgeist since it is a superior solution compared to UTXO, Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), Block Lattice, Tangle, and any other blockchain innovations.


THE UNICORN

Author: Tyler Swob
submitted by Kosass to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Understanding the truth about #UASF and the small block movement: An attempted subversion of Bitcoin's voting system through the introduction of a One-IP-address-One-vote system, a direct violation of the POW voting mechanism described in the white paper.

The proper way to gain influence in the system of Bitcoin is to invest in it's security. The amount of influence you have in the system is directly proportional to how much you have invested into it's security. This is mostly seen with mining, where you "vote" by extending blocks.
Really quickly I want to get something out of the way: There's an argument to be made that coin hodlers have a say too. Holders have the ability to change the supply/demand equilibrium by adding or removing coins from circulation, increasing or decreasing the relative value of remaining circulating coins. What should be noted here is that again, this control of the system was not gained without first making an investment into it.
Now, while we have acknowledged coin hodlers have some influence in the overall value of the system, they don't necessarily "vote" the way miners do, it's a little different. We can differentiate by remembering that Coin hodlers and investors have a vote in determining the overall value of the system, while miners vote on how the system works structurally.
People need to remember, Bitcoin is not a democracy, if you don't invest, you're not supposed to have any control. If it weren't this way, then anyone with an Amazon cloud instance could spin up a bunch of non-mining nodes and start governing the system with no investment into it's security!
Let's go to the white paper for a second, Section 4, it says:
"The proof of work also solves the problem of determining representation in majority decision making. If the majority were based on one IP address-one vote, it could be subverted by anyone able to allocate many IP's. Proof of work is essentially one CPU-one vote. The majority decision is represented by the longest chain, Which has the greatest proof of work effort invested into it."
To me, this is one of the most important parts of the white paper, and one of the biggest clues about who the good and bad actors are. Let's break each sentence down so everyone can understand:
Satoshi understood that there needs to be some type of voting mechanism within the system in order to come to consensus about changes, such as block size, for example. He explains in the above sentence, that the "voting" is determined by CPU power. So whoever has the most CPU power has the biggest vote! Likewise, No CPU power = no vote! Remember, the person who has the most CPU power, is the person who has invested the most into Bitcoin's security, that's how he GOT the CPU power. It's extremely important to note here that "CPU" at the time the white paper was written, was the appropriate term, but now "hash" power would make more sense, since a lot is not done on CPU's anymore, which Satoshi predicted. So even though he says "CPU" we can really interpret that as "hash power." So for the purpose of this paper, CPU power = Hash power. (please, in the comments, someone post a link to where Satoshi predicted GPU and specialized hardware, I don't have the link but I know it exists.) Anyway, he is very clear: you have to consume electricity and use it to generate blocks, that's how you vote. Remember, non-mining nodes don't consume much energy, don't do any hashing, can't put your transaction into a block and basically have little to no power in the system, this is by design.
Sound familiar? Think about the non-mining nodes that have made no investment into the security of the system (since they don't extend blocks.) They are trying to subvert it by allocating many IP's, exactly like Satoshi said in the white paper! Think about it: The twitter polls, the non-mining nodes, the sockpuppet accounts, The #UASF shills, these are all examples of "IP" and NOT "CPU." It's an attempt at subversion through allocating IP addresses, NOT contributing hash power! It is clearly explained that this is NOT the way to vote in the system. A user represents "IP" where a miner represents "CPU." We can draw a clear distinction by the fact that mining requires an expenditure of energy, this is what constitutes the "proof' in "proof of work."
When a miner mines your transaction, he performs a "Proof of work." He says that your transaction occurred, and backs it by the energy he expended to confirm your transaction. The fact that it requires work and an expenditure of energy to solve a block is the "proof." If no block is solved, no "proof" has occurred. Understanding this is absolutely crucial to understanding how Bitcoin works and why the system has value. The "proof" that your transaction is legitimate, is the fact that a miner had to expend energy to confirm it.
Miners have collectively invested Billions of dollars into securing the system. They're the ones with skin in the game. Non-mining nodes and UASF people have no skin in the game, they do not confirm blocks. Anyone can spin up a non-mining node or make a twitter account and vote in twitter polls, etc. I can't stress the importance of this enough: Simply existing does not give you the right to vote in the system of Bitcoin. If you want a vote, you need to invest. A non-mining node is not an investment into the security of the system!
This sentence is pretty self explanatory, he's just saying that whatever most miners agree on, is the correct rules. So if most of the CPU power agreed that blocks are 1MB forever, then blocks are 1MB forever. If most of the CPU power votes for 2MB blocks, by mining them and adding them to the longest chain, then the majority hash power has spoken. THIS is how voting in Bitcoin works. NOT by allocating IP's that don't contribute to proof of work.
If you don't contribute to proof of work, you don't vote.
So how does this all tie into the segwit/segwit2x deal?
In the case of the BTC chain, miners, who have the vote, want to increase block size. They're going to do this regardless of what the non-mining nodes want. They are well within their rights to do so, the system is designed so that miners have ultimate control. Remember, the instant a non-mining node rejects a block from a mining node, he is forking himself off the network. This is extremely important: These people that claim to use their non-mining nodes to "enforce consensus rules" are absolute bullshitters! They're not enforcing a damn thing! They're desperately attempting to usurp control that they're NOT supposed to have! They are attempting to steal control from miners, who have actual skin in the game!
A non-mining node has two choices: Follow the mining nodes, or fork off. Quite frankly, the idea of a non-mining node "enforcing consensus" on a mining node is laughable! Remember, non-mining nodes are READ ONLY, they don't enforce ANYTHING. They can either follow the mining nodes, or fork themselves off the network. SORRY, this is how it works! It's not a matter of opinion, this is the structure of Bitcoin and it's not open for debate.
So, according to the voting system outlined in the white paper, who is right? The segwit2xers, or the NO2xer's?
The 2xers are right, the NO2xer's are wrong. Not because of their opinion on block size, but because they insist on having a vote when they are not supposed to. The NO2xer's are, exactly as CSW said at Bitkan: "Kicking and screaming outside the voting booth." They're very loud, very verbal, using propaganda, censorship and manipulation and other underhanded tactics, in attempt to subvert Bitcoin by turning it into a "One-IP-one-vote" system when it is CLEARLY supposed to be "One-CPU-one-vote." This is not a matter of opinion, this is how the system works. So, by every measurable metric, the NO2x movement is a sybill attack on Bitcoin, an attempt to subvert the rules of the system and gain control that should not be had.
Tl;DR: Miners vote on how the system works structurally by extending blocks on the chain they deem to be the legitimate one. Miners make the rules, users do not. If you want a vote in the system, you have to invest in it's security by extending blocks. If you have NOT invested in the security of the system, you are NOT supposed to have a vote. Core minions, small blockers and the UASF movement in general, is nothing but a bunch of people who have not invested into the security of the system, attempting to dictate how the system works. This is a direct violation of the voting system outlined in section 4 of the white paper and thus, by most measurable metrics, an attack on Bitcoin.
submitted by poorbrokebastard to btc [link] [comments]

Beermoney Essentials: 6 Ways To Earn Passively With Cryptocurrencies In 2018

Hey guys!
This is my second "Beermoney Essentials" post. Here's the first one about Chrome Extensions if you missed it a year ago. These types of posts basically are just about things have seem to become 'essential' information in terms of Beermoney.
This post is going to be about Cryptocurrency. Cryptocurrency has been becoming more and more popular around the beermoney community, and I think it's safe to say that 2018 will be the year of cryptos.
Here's what this post is NOT. This post will not be the 'here's what cryptos I think you should buy and hodl in 2018'. This post IS going to be about cryptos you can get into and do whatever you want to without having to directly invest in them. So yeah, this post is mostly going to be about mining.

6 Ways To Earn Passively With Cryptocurrencies

Alright, so in this post, I'm going to split things up into 4 parts:

Part 1: GPU mining

Does anyone here remember Nice Hash? (I mean, it technically still is a thing actually). Nice Hash is/was a nice site that would allow you to use your PC to mine. I believe they actually mined ETH (I think), but they were nice because they paid out in BTC (which most people prefer). It was really the easy way for just about anyone to get into mining (assuming you have a decent GPU). Just a month or so ago they claim to have been "hacked" and they lost (at the time) ~$60 million in users' bitcoin. For whatever reason a lot of people wanted them to resume operating after the bits were lost, so they are back up. I won't recommend Nicehash at all. I don't think they were really hacked, and I do think it was an inside job. If you want to use Nicehash, you can. I just really don't recommend it, and there are plenty of alternatives. Here are just a few that I found.

WinMiner

WinMiner is a really neat alternative to NiceHash. From what it seems, the payouts on Winminer are a bit lower, but there are a couple advantages to using this site that might outweigh the lower payouts. First of all, Winminer is really easy to use, you can just download it and set it up, and it's all set. The thing about Winminer that is really nice is that you can get paid out in many different ways. If you want, you can cash out to Bitcoin, but they have a $100 minimum, and the fees are really high, so there's a good chance you won't want Bitcoin. Alternatively, you can withdraw your balance to PayPal, ETH, LTC, Amazon, or iTunes. One thing I don't necessarily like about Winminer is that it does keep your balance in USD at all times, so if you earn for a month and go to withdraw if bitcoin's price goes up 50% in that month, you won't get that bonus reflected on your total cashed out because it was in USD. It's probably not an issue for most people.

Kryptex | Nonref

I have been using Kryptex since just after the announcement of NiceHash being hacked. It has a nice UI and it is very customizable with its settings. This is probably the closest site to the original NiceHash. You can request a payout in Bitcoin any time after you have 0.0006 BTC. One thing about Kryptex is that it does have a referral system. You can earn 10% of your referral's earnings. I shamelessly put my referral link above. Feel free to give it a click if you want.
I don't really prefer this site over WinMiner because it doesn't offer quite as many methods of payments, but here it is anyways.

Part 2: CPU Mining

CPU Mining for Bitcoin has been dead for a long time, but there are still some ways to use your CPU to earn some crypto passively.

LoadTeam

LoadTeam used to be a site that would pay you to test loading websites in the background passively. It was never a lot of money (and it still isn't), but they made the change a few months ago to switch over to Crypto Mining. I actually didn't even notice the switch, but I checked my account after a couple months and I had a few dollars sitting there. LoadTeam offers instant paypal transfers with no fee for all balances over $1. It's pretty nice. I didn't even notice a difference in CPU usage over the last few months. I think of it as an easy couple dollars a month, and it runs entirely in the background.

CoinHive Monero Mining

You might have seen this around a bit. CoinHive is a service that allows sites to mine monero in the background(ish). Some sites have been using Coinhive as an alternate to advertising/adblockers. There are a few sites that have been adding coinhive to their site. You can run this passively in the background.
I don't know all of the sites that have CoinHive, but two big ones I know of are FreeBitco.in and CoinPot.
FYI, I think Freebitco.in links are blocked on reddit, but if anyone wants my referral link, send me a PM. I give 100% of my referral earnings back to my referrals.

Part 3: PoC Mining

Burstcoin Mining

PoC Mining you might not have heard of, but it's fucking cool. PoC = Proof of Capacity. While CPU mining uses a computer's CPU, and GPU mining uses graphics cards, PoC mining uses free storage to mine. The appeal of PoC mining is that it seems like everybody has free storage. Check around your house, maybe you'll find a nice external hard drive with some space on it. You can use this to mine from.
Now I know I said above that this wasn't going to be a post of me telling you what cryptos I recommend for you to invest in, but here's my quick pitch for Burstcoin. Burstcoin is the worlds first (and only) PoC coin. It is the "green" crypto. Mining Burstcoin takes up 400x less power than a crypto like Bitcoin. It's really pretty fucking cool, and I absolutely support the coin. Feel free to read more about Burstcoin on /burstcoin, and check out the recent announcement of Dymaxion.
But you're here to learn how to earn from PoC Mining passively.
Unlike CPU and GPU mining, it is a lot more hard to get into because there are a lot more steps involved to setting it up. You'll actually need to know how to 'plot' your storage and set up a mining pool.
I'm not going to write out the entire process because there are plenty of other resources to help you out.
One thing I really recommend is QBundle 1.6, which is probably the closest thing that will walk you through the process of setting up a wallet for burst and start plotting and then mining with your storage.
One thing I'll also point out is that in order to mine burst with a pool you will need at least one burst in order to set the reward recipient. There are faucets you can get a free burst from, but if you can't get the faucets to work, feel free to send me a PM and I'll send over everyone who wants to get into burst a coin to set the recipient.
Here's a video explaining burstcoin a bit more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fyj9RIyxLb4
If there are requests, I will happily make a video explaining how to get started mining with Burstcoin.

Part 4: Saving/Investing

Okay, I said this post wasn't about investing in cryptos, and that's not what this section is about, at all.
This part of the post is about using the cryptos you already have to earn more crypto. There are quite a few options in this space, but I do advise you to take all caution when investing your cryptos into anything. Realize that ANYTHING can become a scam when you're not holding your own private keys.

FreeBitco.in

I've mentioned this a few times in the past, but Freebitco.in allows you to use their site has a savings account/wallet and they pay 4.08% annual compounded interest per year on all your balances held (they pay interest daily). I've been hodling bitcoin on there on and off for quite a long while now and it's really nice. Another advantage I could point out is that their site does work as a wallet as well, and while bitcoin's fees are going crazy, you have the option of setting up an automatic weekly cash out (when you're ready to cash out your balance on their site) and the fee is just 3000 satoshi, or you can sign up for a 1-6 hour payment with a heavily reduced fee, or instant with a full average fee. It's really nice having those options.
Freebitco.in does offer a 25% referral bonus for all interest paid out on their site, and I wrote above:
FYI, I think Freebitco.in links are blocked on reddit, but if anyone wants my referral link, send me a PM. I give 100% of my referral earnings back to my referrals.
I have been paying 100% back for over a year now, and I don't plan on changing that.
Please remember: if you do deposit anything onto freebitco.in that is a risk you're taking.

Conclusion

There are a lot of different ways you can use Cryptocurrencies to your benefit. Even if you don't have a good CPU, GPU, or have much free storage, there are still options for you, and maybe you could even consider taking some of your profits from beermoney in 2018 and putting it into upgrading your own set up, or taking some profits and investing into the cryptos you support.
Previous Beermoney Essentials Posts:
Feeling like sending some cryptobits? Feel free:
BTC: 16quTAkbE5sj7doXcPgGBoUemQgdcQRv84
BCH: 1bHj58bVAAPt4wd6SNUbPxBLP6xHFXc5t
ETH: 0x95F33586adb84EE4568C9556a24b340E5eD51604
LTC: LMvtC4Ltaghyb5k5Ssh1sFn9qnqsHfcTpV
XMR: 42B8knrqLAE2BMbiWtqTcrc1W9mNy2PxdVW32oZaBNAJNjDHMWwMJkCFhHWd3aPczi4gYTon73dqX3iv1GK2tUQKJDC2pWV
BURST: BURST-L3AD-N8MX-BVJD-BW54B
submitted by Fishering to beermoney [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Miner & GPU Miner Guide 2018 - What Miner should you buy ? MASSIVE Crypto Mining Farm Tour  Bitcoin, Dash, and GPU ... Bitcoin Mining on Windows 10 Nvidia GeForce 920M GPU ... This Bitcoin Mining Farm Made $17 Million AFTER Expenses ... Bitcoin miner per laptop utilizzando GPU - Come funziona ...

Hinter der Digitalwährung Bitcoin steckt ein komplexes System aus kryptographischen Techniken. Zentral ist die sogenannte Block Chain - ein ewiges Logfile, in dem alle - Mining mit der GPU Aufgrund einiger Anfragen zu diesem Thema, möchten wir im Folgenden den „groben“ Aufbau eines GPU-Miners näher beschreiben. Bei diesem System handelt es sich um einen GPU-Miner / GPU-Rig, welches problemlos in einem normalen Haushalt oder auch im Rechenzentrum untergebracht werden kann.. Der Grund dafür liegt ganz einfach darin, da hier nur 2 GPU’s pro System verbaut worden sind. Um Bitcoin Mining zu betreiben, müssen Sie einem Miningpool beitreten, was zusätzliche Kosten verursacht. Für das Mining benötigen Sie entsprechende Hardware. Auch hier kommen Kosten auf Sie zu. Je nachdem, wie leistungsfähig Ihr Bitcoin Miner sein soll, zahlen Sie bis zu 2.000 Euro. Amazon.it: bitcoin miner. Selezione delle preferenze relative ai cookie. Utilizziamo cookie e altre tecnologie simili per migliorare la tua esperienza di acquisto, per fornire i nostri servizi, per capire come i nostri clienti li utilizzano in modo da poterli migliorare e per visualizzare annunci pubblicitari. Anche terzi autorizzati utilizzano queste tecnologie in relazione alla nostra ... Amazon.fr: bitcoin miner. Passer au contenu principal.fr. Bonjour, Identifiez-vous. Compte et listes Retours et Commandes. Testez. Prime Panier. Toutes nos catégories Go Rechercher Bonjour Entrez ...

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Bitcoin Miner & GPU Miner Guide 2018 - What Miner should you buy ?

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