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ETH Insider - Ethereum Forums, News, Trading & ICO's

ETH discussion board with a focus on ETH and ETH tokens. Alt-talk only if it is highly relevant for the current price. No FUD, No Hype, No Spamming. Thank you!
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Crypto Insiders

Crypto discussion board with a focus on a variety of coins. No FUD, No Hype, No Spamming. Thank you!
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Epicenter Bitcoin with Robby Dermody: Counterparty – Assets, Dividends And Decentralized Exchange

Epicenter Bitcoin with Robby Dermody: Counterparty – Assets, Dividends And Decentralized Exchange submitted by cryptology26 to counterparty_xcp [link] [comments]

From open arms to full bans: The latest on crypto regulation in Asia

This post was originally published on this siteThis post was originally published on this site When most people hear about buying Bitcoin (BTC) or other cryptocurrencies, they immediately think of the largest exchanges, most of which are located in Asia. Today, countries such as China and South Korea have become epicenters of blockchain innovation. However, in many countries, it’s still unclear whether […]
submitted by FuzzyOneAdmin to fuzzyone [link] [comments]

Weekly Update: Jason starts #discussionThursday, $COTI on Binance, WibsonTree, Harmony + IBC Media... – 21 Feb - 27 Feb'20

Weekly Update: Jason starts #discussionThursday, $COTI on Binance, WibsonTree, Harmony + IBC Media... – 21 Feb - 27 Feb'20
Hiya folks! With this update we will finally be 100% caught up with the latest. Let’s go! Here’s your week at Parachute + partners (21 Feb - 27 Feb'20):

As mentioned 2 weeks back, Alexis announced the start of a new style of raffle from this week. 300k $PAR in the pot to be won! Bose hosted a Friday Quiz in TTR on movies with a 10k $PAR prize pool. Cap shared a unique bit of trivia from the tipbotverse: ChangeTip, a bitcoin tipbot launched 7 years back, was acquired by Airbnb in 2016 that led to its closure. A crypto pioneer that was way ahead of its time. The usual suspects continue to be on top of the Fantasy Premier Leagure (#FPL) leaderboard – LordHades, Alexis and Novelcloud as per the latest update shared by LH. Alejandro hosted a gun-mode CoD game in the Parachute War Zone followed by a free-for-all for $PAR prizes. Tavo announced another CoD Battle Royale in the Parachute War Zone to be held next week. Afful’s TTR trivia was fun as always. Charlotte hosted another trivia in TTR as well for a 10k $PAR prize pool. Victor held one in TTR with another 10k $PAR pot as well. GamerBoy’s trivia in TTR this week was based on Kindergarten Geography. Haha! Belated Birthday wishes to Victor. Two-for-Tuesdays by Gian for this week had the theme rap/reggae/reggaeton. Like last week, Sebastian set up a YouTube playlist to compile all the entries. For #wholesomewed, Parachuters put on their creative hats as they made some epic artwork based on a primary shape shared by Jason. So much talent! There’s $PAR to be won! In the latest project update shared by Cap, ParJar is in final stages of testing with Transak, ParJar integrated coin-swaps are being worked on at the moment and $PAR-based Dex to be launched in the coming weeks in partnership with Switch. Jason launched a new event for Thursdays called #discussionThursday from this week. The first discussion series revolved around "something you don't understand". The goal is "hopefully someone that does understand it can explain it". Good conversations and altruism gets $PAR tips. TTR crew hosted a fun “guess the admin” contest based on the Parachute Christmas artwork.
Lmao Victor!
Happy Carnival to you too Rene
Just a sampling from all the #wholesomewed entries
20k $AXPR was burned as part of the weekly aXpire burn event. aXpire COO Matthew Markham wrote about how technological differentiators give PEs an edge over public markets. The latest Bilr blog post talks about disruptive technologies in the legal industry. 2gether CEO Ramon Ferraz appeared in an IEB podcast to talk about Neobanks. YouTuber FunOntheRide’s latest video covers collaborative economy and how 2gether plays a role in it. Head of Marketing, Laura Braulio explained must-do’s in marketing strategies for fintechs in her article which was published on ClickZ. The XIO DApp went into the final stages of unit testing this week. Beta tests should start soon. For #XIOSocial chatter, Citizens discussed the semantics of the term “crowdstaking”. Ethos’ parent company Voyager released the full Android version of its app this week. Switch-backed McAfeeDex is slated for some updates soon. Read about what’s coming up from John McAfee’s tweet. Plus, a new privacy coin “ghost” is on the horizon. $ESH holders are expected to get a taste of it on launch. For the latest update on Switch, click here. Fantom’s $FTM was one of the winners of a public vote to get listed on ZelCore. As an update to the fantom.rocks tool released last week by GoFantom (a Fantom validator), this week a dApp named Supercharge was released on top of it. Supercharge allows users to send 20 test transactions to demonstrate the speed of consensus. The DAO Maker shared a compilation of Fantom’s 2019 updates. For the 2020 project plan, click here. This was followed by a detailed 2020 roadmap. Too long? No sweat! This graphical representation of the roadmap by Generation Crypto is here to rescue you. Or, if you would rather watch a video, CMO Michael Chen made one. For notes, click here. The first version of Uptrennd’s mobile redesign is here. Congratulations to TREOS for winning the Round 1 of the Uptrennd free advertising package contest that launched last week. Voting for Round 2 started this week with Fantom included in this round. Banano ended up winning the second round and going head to head with TREOS in the finals. The first 2UP Tuesday kicked off this week with every upvote counting for twice the normal points (with the same rules applying for downvotes). Sweet! Uptrennd founder Jeff Kirdeikis was invited to speak at the EntrepreneurShip cruise event. Don’t forget the epic giveaway mentioned.
First sneak peek of Uptrennd’s new mobile design
Catch up on Distric0x’s Weekly update here. If you missed the DappDigest, the crew’s got your back. Their video walkthrough of ETHDenver covers snippets from the event along with Brady’s on-stage performance and an interview of Dmitry Buterin (Vitalik Buterin’s father). Read about how the recent fintech M&A deals will influence markets in this article by Hydrogen. The team sat down for an AMA with Crypto Cabital this week and also hosted a 150k $HYDRO giveaway. Fintech nerds, check out Hydro’s explainer blog post on open banking and WSO2. Is the project ticking off its roadmap items on time? Click here to find out. As a 2020 cohort member of the MassChallenge Fintech accelerator, Hydro’s Senior Director for Strategic Partnerships, Ken Kavanaugh travelled to Boston to talk about “platformication in fintech” at their meetup. If you are attending the Milwaukee Blockchain Conference in March, don’t forget to say Hi to Biz Dev Lead Mark Anstead where he will be a featured speaker. If you haven’t booked your tickets yet, there’s a 50% discount coupon available for you. $HYDRO got listed on DeFi aggregator Totle this week. How does Sentivate aim to solve HTTP / TCP bottlenecks? Click here to find out. For a primer on UDSP, click here. The Mycro Hunter landing page went live this week. OST’s Pepo is the official community app and partner of Europe-based Ethereum Community Conference (EthCC) where it will also be collaborating with Epicenter podcast for the event. The first browser version of Pepo was released. Crypto exchange Mine Digital will be joining SelfKey’s exchange marketplace. SelfKey’s R&D team shared a 2020 update on the identity management space and how the project aims to place itself in this segment.
Early preview of the SelfKey Mobile Wallet to be submitted to App Store for review
For the latest Constellation community update, click here. Don’t forget to send in your questions for the AMA happening next week. Attendees of VeneCoiners meetup in Argentina next week, don’t forget to say Hi to the crew from Wibson who will be presenting the Rewards Marketplace at the event. The team also published a paper on “WibsonTree” which preserves data privacy when interacting with an agent. They hosted an Ethereum meetup this week to discuss DeFi. Here’s a video demo of how fast the Harmony mainnet is. The weekly #pow tweet thread summarises updates from across the team. KuCoin’s $ONE token swap is now complete. A new page was launched to monitor mainnet and testnet status. The crew attended a Binance meetup in Ukraine to talk about latest project updates. Harmony announced a partnership with IBC Media to incubate and accelerate Indian fintech startups. Safe Haven’s digital inheritance solution, Inheriti, will be available on the Harmony chain. $ONE was listed on MathWallet. Intellishare co-founder Nicholas Wan shared a sneak peek of the testnet mobile UI. dGen listed GET Protocol’s GUTS Tickets as one of the notable startups in the Dutch blockchain space in their Blockchain in Europe 2020 Review report. For a project overview click here – nicely summarised by Generation Crypto. GUTS will be ticketing 3 new shows of Chef’Special. Global Crypto Alliance live streamed another demo of its IoT prototype smartlock device being operated through $CALL tokens. The team also hosted a fun quiz on their Telegram this week. YouTuber Crypto Rich interviewed the crew on all things $CALL (Part I, Part II). Nik Patel’s detailed research report on COTI was published this week. $COTI was added to the Staking Rewards platform. And here’s a biggie, Binance listed both the ERC20 and BEP2 versions of the token this week with a bonus airdrop for deposits. Woot! Before the listing frenzy started, the team took a moment to take stock of the situation. A big listing like Binance leads to a lot of new eyeballs that could trigger scams. COTI crew shared their anti-scam guide for this reason. DOMSCRYPTO covered the project in their latest video. DoYourTip was covered in an iHODL news feature.

And with that, we close for this week at Parachute. See you again with another update. Ciao!
submitted by abhijoysarkar to ParachuteToken [link] [comments]

Jobchain® Team won the 1st Prize in Romania Blockchain Summit Contest

Romania Blockchain Summit has been established with the goal to promote the benefits of blockchain technology and its use cases as one of the most important opportunities for achieving economic and social progress both at the level of Romania and at the level of the European Union.
Romania Blockchain Summit has been the largest summit of the industry organized in South-Eastern Europe, bringing together the Romanian public sector, political decision-makers, developers, researchers, global entrepreneurs and leaders, and innovators from the blockchain industry.
Romania’s vibrant startup scene is a well-known reality in the broader IT sector. With the participation of seasoned mentors and savvy worldwide investors, C.A. Rosetti Hall became the epicenter of tomorrow’s innovations. 20 of the most promising blockchain startups fought for the chance of winning the RBS’s Grand Prize and the chance to convince top investors to contribute with additional financing.
Jobchain® gave an overview of the team assembled to implement the Jobchain® Platform, a description of the new functionalities to be included in the ecosystem, as well as an insightful description of the potential impact that Jobchain® can have in emerging economies.
Jobchain® Team was awarded with the 1st Prize Romania Blockchain Summit Contest granted at the Romanian Parlament by the Minister for Communications and Information Society, Alexandru Petrescu.
About Jobchain®
Jobchain® is a pioneering firm with the vision to contribute to the development of a modern society built on the blockchain. Jobchain® Mobile App offers users a safe environment to find jobs and/or hire personnel, anytime, anywhere while earning a salary in cryptocurrency. Jobchain® Mobile App also allows users to buy, sell, send, exchange and spend cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, Ether or Jobchain JOB Token.
submitted by jobchain to Jobchain [link] [comments]

Vitalik Keeps Saying It. A lot of others say it too. Let's Get Real. Crypto and Blockchain Has a Major Problem Problem We Need to Address Immediately. Here's How I Think We'll Do It.

Vitalik Keeps Saying It. A lot of others say it too. Let's Get Real. Crypto and Blockchain Has a Major Problem Problem We Need to Address Immediately. Here's How I Think We'll Do It.

Let's get real. [Vitalik talks about this constantly]. The cryptocurrency/blockchain community has a cultural problem.

Edit: Links here suck. I put quotes around them so you can spot them out. I did a lot of research for this post.
Edit #2: Put square brackets around links. Now they should be clearly visible.
TLDR: The ills Vitalik talks about are primarily about psychology. New scalable solutions can fix it partially, but we have to deal with people first.
Before I dig deep into this post, I want to let you know what it's about. Yes, you'll see some emotional content. You'll see ideological ideas. However, this post ain't about ideologies. It's about something I deem as a real problem. Its about the corrupt mindsets that we have as community since the prices spiked early 2017. To advance forward, I want to analyze them, distill the problem into the most basic form possible, then point people into a direction I deem would be good for the cryptocurrency community. The format will go like this:
  1. My history with Crypto/Blockchain. Why I'm here in the first place.
  2. My analysis of the problem Vitalik talked about
  3. My perceived solution to the problem.
  4. The steps I've already taken towards the problem

Why I'm Here

Time travel back into pre-2017 and you'll see that the cryptocurrency/blockchain community was filled with hopeful young nerds that dreamed of making the world into a better place; A much more open, peaceful and freer place. I was going through a hard time with my life 2015-16 -- my twin died, I was on the verge of going homeless with nobody else to rely on, had to go unbanked in America, almost entirely dropped out of college and my first contracting business failed. I couldn't get my life right at all, and I didn't see any hope. The future was bleak to me. However, I found people here in the blockchain community actually trying their hardest to do things that would solve the world's problems, [even if that was mainly reporting the news for people and addressing people live in chat to create a community]. That drew me in well before the price of cryptocurrencies spiked; almost in a manic like way -- I read about it constantly, practiced solidity, talked to everyone I could that would have the capacity to understand cryptocurrencies and more.
Even now, when I attend conferences, I meet good-hearted, sleep deprived developers, marketers, business owners and specialist that aim to solve the world's greatest problems in the best ways they can. Many are in small corners of the world helping each other out. Inside of this community I found hope and meaning. My depression lifted, my anxiety went away, my life got back on track, and that hope propels me though the field years since I joined this movement. I'm now more confident than ever knowing that collectively this industry will possibly be the epicenter of change for not only money, but for everything. We'll [eliminate poverty], [solve global warming], [prevent hyper-inflation like we've seen with Venezuela], [improve supply chains] around the world, improve healthcare, and solve the [social ills of the world like corruption]. That's just the tip of the iceberg. I believe intensely in the vision set for crypto.
The community is filled with brilliant people that will make a difference. That excites me.
I'm for freedom, boosting happiness of individuals, increasing health, making life more fun and less stressful for the common person, open discussions to progress everyone forward, and a more livable planet. I'm thinking of all people and I'm not against any group. However, I'm not for FUD, greed while abusing others, bigotry, trolling, hatred, racism, evil acts and stealing. Those are against my values. I think that's against the values of many of the cryptocurrency community's foundational members.

A problem we can't ignore

In 2017, as the prices exploded and the returns grew in for the average person, I noticed the community was starting to get tainted. People were no longer focusing on technology, freedom and community. No longer focusing on creating better lives for people in their communities around the world. We were missing the altruism I originally felt in the community. [If I were in Vitalik shoes, where I'd invest 80-100 hours a week into a vision, I'd feel extreme frustration too]. People are instead focusing on [needless politics], searching for the next big price pump, the next big score. Instead of people figuring out about how to use blockchain and crypto for making people's lives better, I've heard people say HODL and scam more than I ever have in the history of the community. This saddens me and frustrates me at the same time. On one end I see great potential and beauty in the community, and at the same time I see the beast within us come out that hasn't been even thought about deeply enough to be accurately tamed. Trolls, profiteers running away with ICO money, market manipulators and scam artist ruining the reputation and progress of the community.
While I could complain about what I see, I decided to instead dissect it in this post. I wanted to know what's causing this on a larger scale. See, by training I'm a psychologist, social scientist and computer scientist. I've been transitioning over to economics and data science because I feel it's a solid cornerstone of the industry. My perspective will be coming from those first. Allow me to explain. If our community is going to "grow up and actually solve problems", the corruption of minds because of money needs to be fully explored first.
Only by understanding the problem thoroughly can we solve it.
Explicitly stating the problem: Its the extreme predatory, egotistical, harsh behavior we as a community have adopted.

The Psychology And Behavioral Science Of Finance

Let's start with the biggest premise. Money is an idea. It exist because people communicate, produce, share, trade, have scarcity for goods and have needs. Money is an ideological binding agent for people.
  • It helps us exchange two irrelevant things with a medium
  • Helps us do more things in knowing the value we hold will help us improve productivity in the future
  • Helps us determine value in an abstract way
  • Helps us navigate the world.
Money is about as social and psychological as anything in the world can get outside of direct human interactions. Coincidentally, this psychological/social aspect isn't talked about very much inside of the cryptocurrency landscape. However, it's the foundation of everything we have here today. If we can't talk about how money is connected to the mind, we can't solve the maturity problem Vitalik was talking about. My intent is to explore that deeply so a firm direction can be at least set.

Money and the Mind

Our mind is complex. Beyond the usual processing of information people have (our 11 senses), we people have 2 primary centers for decision making and control.
Limbic System
The first one is the limbic system. It has gone by the nickname of "the lizard brain" in recent history. It's responsible for storing memories, handling stress responses, attention and emotional processing. In a sense, it controls all of intuition and fast heuristic choices you make.
https://preview.redd.it/xvpw95ate8d11.png?width=551&format=png&auto=webp&s=eeed7e25448614af346091f6ededac41be9df5b5
Prefrontal Cortex
The second system is known as the prefrontal cortex. It controls higher order functions such as planning, reasoning, serial processing and how we think about emotions.
https://preview.redd.it/if5p4n90f8d11.png?width=512&format=png&auto=webp&s=92ef641c4f583d38239cdf380d443b2b7557767e
These two centers are not mutually exclusive. You brain has circuits to make decisions about everything. The two parts talk to each other to do so. Any dysfunction in behavior is usually due to a lack of communication between these two decision centers, rather than a lack of communication between the centers of your brain. This is heavily seen in mental disorders. According to the book [Upward Spiral ], a book that looks at mental disorders from a neuroscientific view and explains how to reverse the ill effects of them, here's now some disorders can play out inside of our heads:
  1. Depression -- A poor link between the Anterior Cingular Cortex and PFC. It means you will notice more negative and therefore act on negative impulses and thoughts.
  2. Dissociation -- A poor link between the Anterior Cingular Cortex and Anterior Insular makes it so your attention can't be accurately directed towards yourself. There will likely be a poor understanding of pain and out of body experiences. It can be reversed with meditation and yoga.

How Crypto Fits

This should hopefully be the first question we have. It's easy to only pay attention to the ill behaviors of the more recent cryptocurrency industry and say "shame on you!". But what if people had a hard time actually controlling themselves? Inside of the book Upward Spiral, Alex Korb, the neuroscientist that wrote it explored that people with depression and anxiety had a hard time not being depressed and anxious by choice. Because the depressed person's circuitry is skewed, they act on it subconsciously in a forever perpetuating loop. In fact, the only way to reverse depression is to reverse the circuitry that holds it together.
Part of what makes anti-depressants more effective is that the serotonin improves sleep and makes a person's brain more susceptible to positive changes. That would be doing things like doing gratitude journals everyday to make your anterior cingular cortices notice more positive events, being around people who love you to boost your serotonin and cut down stress hormones, or getting a little exercise everyday to send oxygen to your brain.
So that leads us back to the original question. What if people didn't have a fully conscious control over how they acted about money and crypto? I did some research between many different articles and found that this was absolutely the case. People don't have much control. They tend to be on extremes of some end all the time.
How Does Finance Play With The Brain?
Of the many ways, there's one key way it does. Money plays with people through the the hypothalamus stress response. It charges people into fight or flight mode, and can literally destabilize the homeostatic systems. This can do all sorts of things. It can make the anterior cingulate weaker in strength (known to help us control emotions and learn), and therefore reduce the power of our prefrontal cortex. When people are stressed about finance, or even excited about it, it will put people into extreme states. [Meaning the lizard brain takes the show]. That can make people easily make haphazard decisions.
Of course, there's other things that happen with the introduction of more money, but that IS the most intense thing to take note of.
If we want to solve the problem of relinquishing poor community, like Vitalik continuously makes comments about, we need to look at the problem in this way. If we don't see it this way, we're screwed. The problem wont be solved, companies like Microsoft will continuously kill off their implementations due to price fluctuations, the cryptocurrency community wont pass go and wont make a huge impact. Instead we'll blame, shout at each other, and create another Wall Street 2.0. In fact, we'll become worse than them. We will have more leverage over resources than any other group in history and the corruption will be strong.
Money affects decisions, period.

Solving the Cultural problem

I'm nervous. As I type this response, I know that by revealing my idea to the public I could be condemned by the community for "shilling", and even worse, somebody else can pick it up and run with it. That is the most nerve wreaking thing I could ever consider. Months of 80 hour weeks and extreme sacrifices to bring out a vision because I didn't see much of a choice. If we don't remove what limits us soon as a community we will get engulfed by outsiders that don't want to create virtuous society.
My solution: Algorithmic Trading
Now, before you tell me that the market is entirely unpredictable, I'd like to be one to say that the notion is false. We see everywhere that people using AI and more complex forms of math to be able to make reasonable gains in the financial world. Companies like Bridgewater predicted the financial crash of 2008 with reasonable accuracy, and other people like [mathematicians are able to do the same]. Realistically, the market has some degree of predictability. However, much of the access to that is limited.
Even beyond that, the financial industry is one of the only social fields that is highly transparent to many actors, through the news and price information, and reflects ideas and beliefs through the markets. If we can better analyze markets, we could discover all sorts of social phenomenon that previously made no sense. With algorithmic trading we're heavily incentivized to learn, as that will produce a direct outcome of earning money.
We could better solve the social ills of the world quickly and efficiently over time. On top of that, we will be able to stabilize the market and protect against bad agents if algorithmic trading becomes coordinated and effective enough throughout the industry.
Again, How Does it Fit With Cryptocurrency?
Bitconnect could answer how automated trading fits.
Before I continue, let me be clear. People lost their money through that scam. It was awful. I know some people that had a lot of money taken from them. Many of them are now fearful of cryptocurrency.
However, I don't think Bitconnect was 100% wrong with their idea. Yes they were a ponzi scheme, yet realistically many of the people I met that fell for it felt as though the crypto markets were already complex. They were losing money while HODLing, making rash decisions and trading.
Bitcoin and the entire industry carries too much of a cognitive burden for a person to keep track of beyond their normal everyday life. News, prices, scams, hacks and technical information. That's a lot to keep track of if you have 3-4 part-time jobs as a single mom or dad while raising 2 kids. That's a lot to keep track of if you're old and don't have the technical capacity to read into the crypto markets all day everyday.
Therefore, even while people were making less money from investing into Bitconnect, on paper it required less thinking and they were still getting benefits that they cared about. They could share with friends because they thought that there money would not shrink in value heavily due to a random market crash. As a consumer, it isn't wrong to believe that you can be apart of something big without having to work an extra 5 hours everyday reading blogs and watching youtube videos just to keep up with the happenings of the industry.
It doesn't require us to be judging people for falling into a ponzi scheme. It requires a bit of caring and empathy to see people's main intentions. They want a better life compared to the one that has been crushing them with student debt and poor job prospects. People want to have a better life without being as stressed beyond belief like they currently are.
And for the everyday trader, giving them the incentive they seek, while giving them the capacity to do some research for themselves is important. Choice matters a lot for some people.

Steps I've taken towards this:

Here comes the shill part you've been waiting for. Over the last year I've been building an application that would help us solve the problems we face today as a community. It I'll reduce the stress response of people worrying more about money, with technology like it getting standardized throughout the entire industry, it'll make things a lot more stable. It's an automated AI-based trading platform that aims to make reduce the cognitive load and worry about holding your funds in crypto. The aim of it is to dynamically trade for people while also letting them have 100% control over their funds. For now, that's by using exchange API keys. Though in the future, that can be through decentralized exchanges, meaning no middle man.
My product's name: It's [Funguana.com]. [Internally meaning the interconnection of all Dhrama in the Huayan Buddhist religion].
I've already received controversial reviews, and feel crazy for putting it back out there. However, I'm now confident I can follow through, and maybe by explaining my reasoning behind why I built it the community will respond differently this time.
To make it more trust-able, 4 months after public release, if my resources allow me to, I plan to open source the infrastructure code so people can implement their own platform within a matter of weeks, then systemically open many of the algorithms so they can appropriate powerful algorithms together over time (many not based on AI). I have to be strategic though. If I open it too soon, too many bad actors can enter the space and cause havoc early, without much chance to keep them in check.
Edit: I made changes to the page to make the links more obvious. Now they're in bold and italic
Edit 2: Adding quotes to make links more obvious again.
submitted by kivo360 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Welcome to Polkadot - Start Here!

![](%%PolkadotLogo2%%)

Welcome to Polkadot!

You have made it to official subreddit of the Polkadot community! Here you can join in the conversation with other Polkadot community members and follow development and community updates.
Polkadot is a revolution, not just in blockchain technology but also in enabling fairer peer-to-peer digital jurisdictions. Polkadot is the foundation of the new Internet, a platform powerful enough to make the vision of Web3 a reality. Join our community and help build the future of the internet.

![](%%100emoji%%) Join the Polkadot Community

The best way to get involved is to join the Ambassador Program:
Meetups are supported by the Web3 Foundation:
Subscribe to the Polkadot Email Newsletter
Subscribe to Polkadot’s Webinar Channel on Crowdcast
Subscribe to Polkadot’s YouTube Channel
Subscribe to Web3 Foundations YouTube Channel
Polkadot Website
Polkadot Wiki (Developers)
Polkadot Watercooler - Riot Chat
Polkadot Twitter
Polkadot Forum – Used for processing feedback
Polkadot Medium – Development and community updates
PolkaDAO – Make a project proposal to get funded!
![](%%dividerpink%%)

![](%%NerdGlassesEmoji%%) Polkadot Overview

What is Polkadot?

Polkadot empowers blockchain networks to work together under the protection of shared security. Founded by some of the blockchain industry’s foremost builders like Dr. Gavin Wood, Polkadot is a platform with low barriers to entry for flexible, autonomous economies acting together within Polkadot’s shared security umbrella. This is an open-source project founded by the Web3 Foundation.

What problems is Polkadot solving?

At a high level, here are the problems we are attempting to solve:
Interoperability
Scalability
Shared Security

How will this be accomplished technically?

Polkadot consists of many parachains with potentially differing characteristics which can make it easier to achieve anonymity or formal verification. Transactions can be spread out across the chains, allowing many more to be processed in the same period of time. Polkadot ensures that each of these blockchains remains secure and that any dealings between them are faithfully executed. Specialised parachains called bridges can be created to link independent chains.
Relay chain
Parachains
Bridges
![](%%RelayChain%%)

![](%%rockstarEmoji%%) Who is already building on Polkadot and what are they building?

Check out PolkaProject (community-maintained) for a full list of 40+ projects building on Polkadot across DeFi, smart contract platforms, scaling, oracles, DAOs, exchanges, IOT, privacy, and more. Here are a few examples:
Data curation networks (Ocean Protocol)
Oracles that make off-chain data available to all contracts on the Polkadot network (ChainLink)
Identity chains that link accounts to a persistent identity and enable access to other parachains through fewer accounts (Speckle OS)
Financial chains that allow you to hold all your assets in one portfolio, including via bridges to Bitcoin, Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash, Litecoin and ZCash (ChainX, Katallassos)
Payments chains with lightning-fast transactions (Blink Network)
Internet of Things chains that set IoT standards for machine-to-machine communication (MXC Protocol)

![](%%DangoDotEmoji%%)What is the DOT token used for?

The DOT token powers the Polkadot network and serves 4 distinct purposes: governance over the network, operation, bonding, and interoperability.
Governance
Bonding (basically, securing a parachain slot)
Operation
Interoperability
![](%%dividerpink%%)

![](%%cautionEmoji%%)![](%%RabbitEmoji%%) Caution: Rabbit hole starts here

![](%%happyhandsemoji%%) Learn More (non-technical)

Reading
Videos
Subscribe to Polkadot’s YouTube Channel
Subscribe to Web3 Foundations YouTube Channel
Audio

![](%%toolemoji%%) Developers – How to Start Building

Polkadot Wiki - All Development Documentation
Polkadot Builder’s Portal
Substrate Dev Portal
Polkadot Technical Chat on Riot - ask any technical questions you might have
Polkadot Validator Lounge - Where the Polkadot Validators hang out and ask questions

Development Updates and Resources

![](%%birdemoji%%) Kusama - A Canary Network for Polkadot Experiements

The early, unaudited and unrefined delivery of Polkadot. Expect Chaos.

![](%%talkingEmoji%%) Chats for Teams Building on Polkadot

submitted by dzr9127 to dot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Profitability: How Long Does it Take to Mine One Bitcoin in 2019?

When it comes to Bitcoin (BTC) mining, the major questions on people’s minds are “how profitable is Bitcoin mining” and “how long would it take to mine one Bitcoin?” To answer these questions, we need to take an in-depth look at the current state of the Bitcoin mining industry — and how it has changed — over the last several years.
Bitcoin mining is, essentially, the process of participating in Bitcoin’s underlying security mechanism — known as proof-of-work — to help secure the Bitcoin blockchain. In return, participants receive compensation in bitcoins (BTC).
When you participate in Bitcoin mining, you are essentially searching for blocks by crunching complex cryptographic challenges using your mining hardware. Once a block is discovered, new transactions are recorded and verified within the block and the block discoverer receives the block rewards — currently set at 12.5 BTC — as well as the transactions fees for the transactions included within the block.
Once the maximum supply of 21 million Bitcoins has been mined, no further Bitcoins will ever come into existence. This property makes Bitcoin deflationary, something which many argue will inevitably increase the value of each Bitcoin unit as it becomes more scarce due to increased global adoption.
The limited supply of Bitcoin is also one of the reasons why Bitcoin mining has become so popular. In previous years, Bitcoin mining proved to be a lucrative investment option — netting miners with several fold returns on their investment with relatively little effort.
bitcoin mining hardware
Mining Hardware
The mining hardware you choose will mostly depend on your circumstances — in terms of budget, location and electricity costs. Since the amount of hashing power you can dedicate to the mining process is directly correlated with how much Bitcoin you will mine per day, it is wise to ensure your hardware is still competitive in 2019.
Bitcoin uses SHA256 as its mining algorithm. Because of this, only hardware compatible with this algorithm can be used to mine Bitcoin. Although it is technically possible to mine Bitcoin on your current computer hardware — using your CPU or GPU — this will almost certainly not generate a positive return on your investment and you may end up damaging your device.
The most cost-effective way to mine Bitcoin in 2019 is using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) mining hardware. These are specially-designed machines that offer much higher performance per watt than typical computers and have been an absolutely essential purchase for anybody looking to get into Bitcoin mining since the first Avalon ASICs were shipped in 2013.
When it comes to selecting Bitcoin mining hardware, there are several main parameters to consider — though the importance of each of these may vary based on personal circumstances and budget.
Performance per Watt
When it comes to Bitcoin mining, performance per watt is a measure of how many gigahashes per watt a machine is capable of and is, hence, a simple measure of its efficiency. Since electricity costs are likely to be one of the largest expenses when mining Bitcoin, it is usually a good idea to ensure that you are getting good performance per watt out of your hardware.
Ideally, your mining hardware would be highly efficient, allowing it to mine Bitcoin with lower energy requirements — though this will need to be balanced with acquisition costs, as often the most efficient hardware is also the most expensive. This means it may take longer to see a return on investment.
In countries with cheap electricity, performance per watt is often less of a concern than acquisition costs and price-performance ratio. In most countries, operating outdated mining hardware is typically cost prohibitive, as energy costs outweigh the income generated by the mining equipment.
However, this may not be the case for those operating in countries with extremely cheap electricity — such as Kuwait and Venezuela — as even older equipment can still be profitable. Similarly, miners with a free energy surplus, such as from wind or solar electric generators, can benefit from the minimal gains offered by still running outdated hardware.
Longevity
The lifetime of mining hardware also plays a critical role in determining how profitable your mining venture will be. It’s always a good idea to do whatever possible to ensure it runs as smoothly as possible.
Since mining equipment tends to run at a full (or almost full) load for extended periods, they also tend to break down and fail more frequently than most electronics — which can seriously damage your profitability. Equipment failure is even more common when purchasing second-hand equipment. Since warranty claims are often challenging, it can often take a long time to receive a warranty replacement.
Price-Performance Ratio
In many cases, one of the major criteria used to select mining hardware is the price-performance ratio — a measure of how much performance a machine outputs per unit price. In the case of cryptocurrency mining hardware, this is commonly expressed as gigahashes per dollar or GH/$.
Under ideal circumstances, the mining hardware would have a high price-performance ratio, ensuring you get a lot of bang for your buck. However, this must also be considered in combination with the acquisition costs and the expected lifetime of the machine — since the absolute most powerful machines are not always the cheapest or the most energy efficient.
Acquisition Costs
Acquisition costs are almost always the biggest barrier to entry for most Bitcoin miners since most top-end mining hardware costs several thousand dollars. This problem is further compounded by the fact that many hardware manufacturers offer discounts for bulk purchases, allowing those with deeper pockets to achieve a better price-performance ratio.
Acquisition costs include all the costs involved in purchasing any mining equipment, including hardware costs, shipping costs, import duties, and any further costs. For example, many ASIC miners do not include a power supply — which can be another considerable expense, since the 1,000W+ power supplies usually required tend to cost several hundred dollars alone.
Ensuring your equipment runs smoothly can also add in additional costs, such as cooling and maintenance expenses. In addition, some miners may want to invest in uninterruptible power supplies to ensure their hardware keeps running — even if the power fails temporarily.
asic mining
Current Generation Hardware
One of the most recent additions to the Bitcoin mining hardware market is the Ebang Ebit E11++, which was released in October 2018. Using a 10nm fabrication process for its processors, the Ebit E11++ is able to achieve one of the highest hash rates on the market at 44TH/s.
In terms of efficiency, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is arguably the best on the market, offering 44TH/s of hash rate while drawing just 1,980W of power, offering 22.2GH/W performance. However, as of writing, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is out of stock until March 31, 2019 — while its price of $2,024 (excluding shipping) may make it prohibitively expensive for those first getting involved with Bitcoin mining.
Another popular choice is the ASICminer 8 Nano, a machine released in October 2018 that offers 44TH/s for $3,900 excluding shipping. The ASICminer 8 Nano draws 2,100W of power, giving it an efficiency of almost 21GH/W — slightly lower than the Ebit E11++ while costing almost double the price. However, unlike the E11++, the 8 Nano is actually in stock and available to purchase.
ASICminer also offers the 8 Nano Pro, a machine launched in mid-2018 that offers 80 TH/s of hash rate for $9,500 (excluding shipping). However, unlike the Ebit E11++ and 8 Nano, the minimum order quantity for the 8 Nano Pro is curiously set at five, meaning you will need to lay out a minimum of $47,500 in order to actually get your hands on one (or five).
While the 8 Nano Pro doesn’t offer the same performance per watt as the Ebit E11+ or AICMiner 8 Nano, it is one of the quieter miners on this list, making it more suitable for a home or office environment. That being said, the ASICminer 8 Nano Pro is easily the most expensive miner per TH on this list — costing a whopping $118.75/TH, compared to the $46/TH offered by the E11++ and $88.64 offered by the 8 Nano.
The latest hardware on this list is the Innosilicon T3 43T, which is currently available for pre-order at $2,279, and estimated to ship in March 2019. Offering 43TH/s of performance at 2,100W, the T3 43T comes in at an efficiency of 20.4GH/W, which is around 10 percent less energy efficient than the Ebit E11++.
The T3 43T also has a minimum order quantity of three units, making the minimum acquisition cost $6837 + shipping for preorders. All in all, the T3 43T is more costly and less efficient than the E11++ but may arrive slightly earlier since Ebang will not ship the E11++ units until at least end March 29, 2019.
Finally, this list would not be complete without including Bitmain’s latest offering, the Antminer S15-28TH/s, which — as its name suggests — offers 28TH/s of hash power while drawing just under 1600W at the wall. The Antminer S15 is one of the only SHA256 miners to use 7nm processors, making it somewhat smaller than some of the other devices on this list.
Like most pieces of top-end Bitcoin mining hardware, the Antminer S15 27TH/s model is currently sold out, with current orders not shipping until mid-February 2019. However, the S15 is offered at a significantly lower price than many of its competitors at just $1020 (excluding shipping), with no minimum quantity restriction. At these rates, the Antminer comes in at just $37.78/TH — though its energy efficiency is a much less impressive 17.5GH/W.
Mining Hardware Mining Hardware Comparison
Performance (GH/W) Price Performance Ratio ($/TH)
Ebang Ebit E11++ 22.2GH/W $46/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano 21GH/W $88.64/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano Pro 19GH/W $118.75/TH
Innosilicon T3 43T 20.4GH/W $53/TH
Antminer S15-28TH/s 17.5GH/W $37.78/TH
How To Select a Good Mining Pool
Mining pools are platforms that allow miners to pool their resources together to achieve a higher collective hash rate — which, in turn, allows the collective to mine more blocks than they would be able to achieve alone.
Typically, these mining pools will distribute block rewards to contributing miners based on the proportion of the hash rate they supply. If a pool contributing a total of 20 TH/s of hash rate successfully mines the next block, a user responsible for 10 percent of this hash rate will receive 10 percent of the 12.5 BTC reward.
Pools essentially allow smaller miners to compete with large private mining organizations by ensuring that the collective hash rate is high enough to successfully mine blocks on regular basis. Without operating through a mining pool, many miners would be unlikely to discover any blocks at all — due to only contributing a tiny fraction of the overall Bitcoin hash rate.
While it is quite possible to be successful mining without a pool, this typically requires an extremely large mining operation and is usually not recommended — unless you have enough hash rate to mine blocks on a regular basis.
Although it is technically possible to discover blocks mining solo and keep the entire 12.5 BTC reward for yourself, the odds of this actually occurring are practically zero — making pool collaboration practically the only way to compete in 2019 and beyond.
Selecting the best pool for you can be a challenging job since the vast majority of pools are quite similar and offer similar features and comparable fees. Because of this, we have broken down the qualities you should be looking for in a new pool into four categories; reputation, hash rate, pool fees, and usability/features:
Reputation
The reputation of a pool is one of the most important factors in selecting the pool that is best for you. Well-reputed pools will tend to be much larger than newer or less well-established pools since few pools with a poor reputation can stand the test of time.
Well-reputed pools also tend to be more transparent about their operation, many of which provide tools to ensure that each user is getting the correct reward based on the hash rate contributed. By using only pools with a great reputation, you also ensure your hash rate is not being used for nefarious purposes — such as powering a 51 percent attack.
When comparing a list of pools that appear suitable for you, it is a wise move to read their user reviews before making your choice — ensuring you don’t end up mining at a pool that steals your hard-fought earnings.
Hash Rate
When it comes to mining Bitcoin, the probability of discovering the next block is directly related to the amount of hashing power you contribute to the network. Because of this, one of the major features you should be considering when selecting your pool is its total hash rate — which is often closely related to the proportion of new blocks mined by the pool
Since the total hash rate of a pool is directly related to how quickly it discovers new blocks, this means the largest pools tend to discover a relative majority of blocks — leading to more regular rewards. However, the very largest pools also tend the have higher fees but often make up for this with sheer success and additional features.
Sometimes, some of the largest pools have a minimum hash rate requirement ù leaving some of the smaller miners left out of the loop. Although smaller pools typically have more relaxed requirements with reduced performance thresholds, these pools may be only slightly more profitable than mining solo.
Pool Fees
When choosing a suitable pool, typically one of the major considerations is its fees. Typically, most pools will charge a small fee that is deducted from your earnings and is usually around 1-2 percent — but sometimes slightly lower or higher.
There are also pools that offer 0 percent fees. However, these are often much smaller than the major pools and tend to make their money in a different way — such as through monthly subscriptions or donations.
Ideally, you will choose the pool that offers the best balance of fees to other features. Usually, the pool with the absolute lowest fees is not the best choice. Additionally, pools with the lowest fees often have the highest withdrawal minimums — making pool hopping uneconomical for most.
Usability and Features
When first starting out with Bitcoin mining, learning how to set up a pool and navigating through the settings can be a challenge. Because of this, several pools target their services to newer users by offering a simple to navigate user interface and providing detailed learning resources and prompt customer support.
However, for more experienced miners, simple pools don’t tend to offer a variety of features needed to maximize profitability. For example, although many mining pools focus their entire hash rate towards mining a single cryptocurrency, some are large enough to offer additional options — allowing users to mine other SHA256 coins such as Bitcoin Cash (BCH) or Fantom if they choose.
These pools are technically more challenging to use and mostly designed for those familiar with mining, happy to hop from coin to coin mining whichever is most profitable at the time. There are even some exchanges that automatically direct their combined hash rate at the most profitable cryptocurrency — taking the guesswork out of the equation.
bitcoin mining pool
Best Mining Pools for 2019
The Bitcoin mining pool industry has a large number of players, but the vast majority of the Bitcoin hash rate is concentrated within just a few pools. Currently, there are dozens of suitable pools to choose from — but we have selected just a few of the best to help get you started on your journey.
Slushpool was the first Bitcoin mining pool released, being launched way back in 2010 under the name “Bitcoin Pooled Mining Server.” Since then, Slushpool has grown into one of the most popular pools around — currently accounting for just under 10 percent of the total Bitcoin hash rate.
Although Slushpool isn’t one of the very largest pools, it does offer a newbie-friendly interface alongside more advanced features for those that need them. The pool has moderately high fees of 2 percent but offers servers in several countries — including the U.S., Europe, China, and Japan — giving it a good balance of fees to features.
BTC.com is another potential candidate for your pool and currently stands as the largest public Bitcoin mining pool. It is responsible for mining around 17 percent of new blocks. Being the largest public mining pool provides users with a sense of security, ensuring blocks are mined regularly and a stable income is made.
Image courtesy of Blockchain.info.
BTC.com is owned by Bitmain, a company that manufacturers mining hardware, and charges a 1.5 percent fees — placing it squarely in the middle-tier in terms of fees. Unlike other platforms, BTC.com uses its own payment structure known as FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), which means miners also receive a share of the transaction fees included within mined blocks — making it slightly more profitable than standard payment per share (PPS) pools.
Another great option is Antpool, a mining pool that supports mining services for 10 different cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, Litecoin (LTC) and Ethereum (ETH). AntPool frequently trades places with BTC.com as the largest Bitcoin mining pool. However, as of this writing, it occupies the title of the third-largest public mining pool.
What sets Antpool apart from other pools is the ability to choose your own fee system — including PPS, PPS+, and PPLNS. If you choose PPLNS, using Antpool is free but you will not receive any transaction fees from any blocks mined. Antpool also offers regular payouts and has a low minimum payout of just 0.001 BTC, making it suitable for smaller miners.
Last on the list of the best Bitcoin mining pools in 2019 is the Bitcoin.com mining pool. Although this is one of the smaller pools available, the Bitcoin.com pool has some redeeming features that make it worth a look. It offers mining contracts, allowing you to test out Bitcoin mining before investing in mining equipment of your own. According to Bitcoin.com, they are the highest paying Pay Per Share (PPS) pool in the world, offering up to 98 percent block rewards as well as automatic switching between BTC and BCH mining to optimize profitability.

Electricity Costs
While your mining hardware is most important when it comes to how much BTC you can earn when mining, your electricity costs are usually the largest additional expense. With electricity costs often varying dramatically between countries, ensuring you are on the best cost-per-KWh plan available will help to keep costs down when mining.
Most commonly, large mining operations will be set up in countries where electricity costs are the lowest — such as Iceland, India, and Ukraine. Since China has one of the lowest energy costs in the world, it was previously the epicenter of Bitcoin mining. However, since the government began cracking down on cryptocurrencies, it has largely fallen out of favor with miners.
Technically, Venezuela is one of the cheapest countries in the world in terms of electricity, with the government heavily subsidizing these energy costs — while Bitcoin offers an escape from the hyperinflation suffered by the Venezuelan bolivar. Despite this, importing mining hardware into the country is a costly endeavor, making it impractical for many people.
Finding ways to lower your electricity costs is one of the best ways to improve your mining profitability. This can include investing in renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, or wind — which can yield increased profitability over the long term.
if you are looking to buy bitcoin mining equipment here is some links:

Model Antminer S17 Pro (56Th) from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 56Th/s for a power consumption of 2385W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s17-pro-56th-copy/?wpam_id=17
Model Antminer S9K from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 14Th/s for a power consumption of 1323W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s9k-14-th-s/?wpam_id=17
Model T2T 30Tfrom Innosilicon mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 30Th/s for a power consumption of 2200W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/innosilicon-t2t-30t/?wpam_id=17
mining wholesale website:
https://miningwholesale.eu/?wpam_id=17
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South Korea Is Hoping For Regulator Clarity as Crypto Law Toughen

South Korea Is Hoping For Regulator Clarity as Crypto Law Toughen


News by Cointelegraph: Stephen O’Neal
South Korean regulators seems to strongly favor blockchain over cryptocurrencies, and some recent events have further proven this hypothesis. As a result, as much as 97% of local digital assets exchanges are in danger of extinction, local reports suggest.
Meanwhile, local politicians and regulators have started lobbying a new set of regulations, which could finally bring some clarity into this complex but crucial cryptocurrency market. So, how likely are they to succeed, and what are the main obstacles?
With the opening of Korean headquarters in Seoul, Cointelegraph looks deeper into the local regulatory landscape alongside Cointelegraph Korea’s chief editor, David Lee.

Midsized exchange’s closure revealed larger problems

Although South Korean exchanges are de jure permitted to trade Bitcoin (BTC) and other digital assets, most of those platforms seem to be in a fix, as the recent closure of a local crypto exchange called Prixbit revealed. When it shut down in early August, “due to negative internal and external influences,” as the owners put it, local press reported that excluding the country’s four largest players — Upbit, Bithumb, Coinone and Korbit, unofficially known as “the big four” — many small and midsized exchanges cannot open real-name virtual accounts for their users as a result of banks’ disinclination.
Indeed, while South Korean regulators introduced a real-name trading system for cryptocurrencies as part of Anti-Money Laundering (AML) efforts in January 2018, only the big four trading platforms have managed to establish corresponding relationships with local banks so far.
As per new regulations, domestic cryptocurrency markets are required to share users’ transaction data with banks, while traders themselves can only use bank accounts in their legal name that matches the name on their trading account.
Park Jong-baek, a partner at South Korean law firm BKL, told Cointelegraph, “Out of about six banks which set up such account system, only three decided to provide such account service to only big four exchanges.”
According to the lawyer, although other exchanges have been persistently asking banks to render that service for them too, all proposals were rejected based on the assumption that “transactions of cryptocurrencies even with real-name basis could be vulnerable to money laundering, terror or other illegal activities.”
That prompted those not considered to be in the big four of South Korean trading platforms to record transactions of individuals under the corporate, or “honeycomb,” accounts, according to Jun-heon Hwang, a market analyst at Seoul-based cryptocurrency firm BCSolution.
The law regarding virtual accounts leaves that loophole, Hwang told Cointelegraph, while local banks are reluctant to provide their services for smaller trading exchanges. According to the analyst, the dependance on honeycomb corporate accounts make those small and midsized players particularly vulnerable to hacking and other security-related incidents.
Non-big-four exchanges can indeed run fiat-involving transactions without real-name accounts through honeycomb bank accounts, Jong-baek confirmed to Cointelegraph. Those accounts could be opened up by certain banks mostly without disclosing their real purpose:
“Banks may or may not close such accounts in their discretion when they recognize the real purpose afterwards. In practice most banks have not terminated or closed such accounts even after their recognition only because they are used for cryptocurrencies unless they cause banks other concerns.”
A representative for Kdex, a top-10 crypto exchange in South Korea by trading volume, confirmed to Cointelegraph that it does not provide real-name virtual accounts despite attempting to register with local banks at least several times. Although Kdex has established “a real name certification” after collaborating with a third-party company, the spokesperson added, having the actual sanctioned system in place would have made deposit and withdrawal procedures considerably easier.
However, some South Korean exchanges have managed to take advantage of this complex situation. A representative for Gopax, another major domestic trading provider that is currently locked out of the real-name virtual accounts system, informed Cointelegraph:
“Ironically, the lack of virtual accounts has helped in a roundabout way: the lack of such accounts allows GOPAX users to use whichever bank account they currently use for deposit and withdrawal purposes. In contrast, exchanges with virtual accounts require the user to have an account at a specific commercial bank to use them; as such, the lack of virtual accounts has served to increase the ease of use for GOPAX.”
Still, the exchange’s spokesperson added that it is “currently in discussion with several of the largest commercial banks in Korea” regarding the issuance of virtual real-name accounts, which confirms the feature’s importance for South Korean cryptocurrency exchanges.
Another alleged factor for the poor performance of domestic cryptocurrency exchanges is low trading volume. Albeit data from crypto analytics website Coinhills shows that the South Korean won is currently ranked the third-most traded national currency for BTC, Business Korea reports a much grimer picture. According to the publication, “only five or six” South Korean exchanges rank among the top 100 in the world by transaction volume, which indeed seems to correlate with current data obtained from CoinMarketCap.
“It is no exaggeration to say that 97 percent of domestic exchanges are in danger of going bankrupt due to their low volume of transactions,” the article concluded. However, it is difficult to confirm that information: There is no official data on the South Korean market, because the opening of a crypto exchange in the country doesn’t require obtaining any registration, license or permit.

Local regulations toughened circa 2017–2018

Back in 2017, times were different (arguably more favorable) for the local crypto players. In July that year, the government recognized Bitcoin as a legal payment method, allowing fintech companies to process up to $20,000 worth of South Korean won in BTC for their clients. As a result, domestic exchange platforms were moved under the purview of the country’s top financial regulator, the Financial Services Commission (FSC). The watchdog required capital of at least $436,000 to be retained, plus additional data for Know Your Customer (KYC) and AML purposes.
At the time, local exchanges processed over 14% of global Bitcoin trades, being the third-largest market after the U.S. and Japan. The situation took a different turn in September, when the FSC suddenly rolled out a Chinese-like blanket ban on initial coin offerings (ICOs), triggering observable sell-offs in the market. The agency explained the move with the lack of stability and rising risks of financials scams at the time.
Then, in late 2017, the South Korean market found itself at the epicenter of ongoing crypto mania. When Bitcoin’s price famously soared from $5,000 to $20,000, it briefly traded for as much as $25,000 on local exchanges. The premium rates were dubbed the Kimchi Premium, and effectively triggered the government to step in with rigid regulations in a bid to poise the market.
Thus, in January 2018, the FSC banned anonymous trading on local exchanges, additionally locking out foreigners and minors. The agency followed the innovation with a series of on-site inspections of local banks providing services to cryptocurrency exchanges and fines totaling 141 million won ($130,000) billed to a number of local trading platforms that ostensibly provided insufficient user data protection.
As soon as February, first blood was spilled: Coinpia, one of the exchanges that had been fined by the FSC for poor user data protection, went offline after failing to comply with the new KYC requirements. Eventually, other domestic exchanges, such as Coinnest, closed shop.
In April 2018, the Korean Blockchain Association (KBA) — an alliance comprised of 14 crypto trading platforms, including Bithumb, Upbit and OKCoin — published a self-regulatory framework for its members to boost trading transparency. It contained five key requirements, including managing clients’ coins separately from their own, holding a minimum equity of 2 billion won ($1.8 million),and publishing regular audit and finance reports.
In January 2019, despite the National Assembly debating the ICO ban, the watchdog officially announced that the restriction would stay in place as the FSC announced. A week later, South Korea’s central bank issued a warning over central bank digital currencies, or CBDCs, further cementing the government’s overall cold attitude toward cryptocurrencies.

Blockchain as the new direction for South Korea

Notably, South Korean regulators have been much more welcoming toward the technology underpinning crypto. In June 2018, the country’s Ministry of Science and ICT announced an extensive Blockchain Technology Development Strategy that aims to raise 230 billion won (approximately $207 million) by 2022.
The new initiative is expected to foster 10,000 blockchain industry professionals and 100 companies in areas including real estate, online voting, shipping logistics, real estate and international e-document distribution, among other things.
Closer to the end of that year, South Korea’s government announced it will spend 4 billion won (about $3.5 million) to set up a blockchain-enabled virtual power plant in Busan. In July 2019, Busan even decided to launch a local cryptocurrency to revive the local economy, secure a leading position in blockchain development and hence further strengthen its position as the preferred bidder for South Korea’s blockchain regulation-free zone.
As a part of the potential designation, Busan is reportedly going to promote blockchain in multiple industries, as well as to provide a basis for cryptos, including ICOs in particular. Its main competitor for the role, Jeju Island, has recently announced the Blockchain Hub City Development Research Service. Future strategy director of Jeju Island Noh Hee-seop said of the development that he expects Jeju to become a blockchain hub and contribute to the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
Furthermore, this summer, President Moon Jae-in announced that regulatory innovation regarding blockchain technology is now a question of survival for the nation. Specifically, Moon declared:
“While regulatory innovation in the era of industrialization was a matter of choice, it is now a question of survival as we are experiencing the fourth industrial revolution, characterized by fusions across industries and fields.”
The largest national business players are actively looking into blockchain, too. Both electronics giants Samsung and LG are reportedly working on blockchain-focused smartphones, domestic financial institutions are incorporating the technology for their services, local mobile carriers are announcing large scale blockchain projects.
However, the “Bitcoin before blockchain”-like agenda has had its consequences on the local market: Namely, South Korean internet giant Kakao, which has over 50 million global users, is reportedly having problems listing its Klay cryptocurrency on local exchanges due to the ICO ban.
According to recent reports from local press, Kakao is not the only local player having such troubles. Apparently, South Korean blockchain projects have been “flocking” to foreign exchanges over the past months. So, will the situation change in the future? Some recent developments suggest that it could be the case.

Latest developments

In March 2019, congressman Kim Byung-wook of the ruling Minjoo Party proposed a set of cryptocurrency regulations known as the “Amendment to the Law on the Reporting and Use of Specific Financial Transaction Information,” breaking the established silence of South Korean regulators.
Notably, the amendment defines cryptocurrencies as virtual assets, and subordinates cryptocurrency exchanges to the Financial Intelligence Unit, an agency controlled by the FSC. It also introduces a licensing system for cryptocurrency exchanges and is largely influenced by regulations outlined by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), an AML intergovernmental organization. If the amendment comes into power, it will replace the aforementioned guidelines established by the FSC in January 2018.
The amendment was expected to pass the National Assembly before July 9 and hence invalidate previous FSC guidelines, but it failed to be enacted. As Shin Ha-young, the secretary of the amendment’s author, told Cointelegraph that the bill fell flat because the National Assembly’s Policy Committee “found no time” to publically review it before voting.
“Under the current situation, it is not clear when it will be legislated,” Shin added. Meanwhile, local experts believe that the amendment might come into power by June 2020, when FATF guidelines for international regulation of cryptocurrencies are applied to 37 FATF member countries.
A big-four exchange official who requested to remain anonymous told Cointelegraph that it supports the amendment because “even FATF-oriented guideline is better than nothing.” However, the bill most likely won’t be passed in the near future, the source added.
Later in August, the Seoul Central District Court accepted the injunction filed by local cryptocurrency exchanges Coinz, BitSonic and Ventasbeat against banks that suspended their honeycomb accounts. As a result, the use of business accounts by domestic trading platforms can officially be recognized as legal.
“There is a real situation in which Crypto exchanges have a clear intention to use a real name verification deposit account service, but have have not even given a chance to receive it,” the court said.
Meanwhile, OKex, another exchange that has recently launched a self-regulated organization, or SRO, aiming to standardize crypto exchange compliance practices and policies across the world, has already started following FATF guidelines amid the general regulatory uncertainty in South Korea. In September, the local arm of trading platform delisted five major privacy-focused altcoins, citing new guidelines issued by the international regulator.
“We are committed to providing a credible and trustable platform for traders, and we do respect local regulators,” Andy Cheung, head of operations of OKEx, told Cointelegraph of the move, adding:
“We support curbing crypto-related crimes but at the same time the industry needs its space to grow and develop, hence putting it under a microscope might not be the best thing for the industry.”
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No One Actually Knows What Bitcoin Will Do Next

No One Actually Knows What Bitcoin Will Do Next
Bitcoin and cryptocurrency markets are highly volatile and, according to new research, incredibly unpredictable, appearing to move independently of most traditional or expected indicators.
The bitcoin price, which has doubled so far this year after recording heavy losses throughout 2018, is hovering around $8,000 per bitcoin. Most other major cryptocurrencies, including ethereum, bitcoin cash, litecoin, and Ripple's XRP, have also made significant gains in recent months.
Now, it's been revealed that bitcoin and cryptocurrency markets do not respond to any of the things that usually move traditional currencies, stocks and shares, or commodities, data provider Indexica has found.
Bitcoin has swung wildly in price over recent months, exploding higher in April after months of declines.
Getty
"We tested bitcoin and other major cryptocurrencies including ethereum and bitcoin cash in the same way we've tested popular stocks and traditional currencies," said Zak Selbert, chief executive of Indexica.
"From our extensive research, and we've done more testing around bitcoin and cryptocurrencies than we have for pretty much any other asset we've analyzed, it simply appears the bitcoin price and crypto markets just don't respond as we would expect them to."
Stocks, traditional currencies, and commodities generally move on company announcements, government policy, and technological developments, while bitcoin and cryptocurrency prices do not, according to Indexica.
It's been suggested that the bitcoin and cryptocurrency market's relatively young age could be behind the difficulties in pinpointing what's caused market moves.
"As we're dealing with an emerging asset class, crypto evaluation metrics are still largely being developed," said Mati Greenspan, senior market analyst at brokerage eToro. "Stocks, bonds, currencies, and commodities all have decades if not centuries of price discovery, so analysts more or less know what to expect.
"The crypto market has only begun to mature in the last two years, so we don't have any of that. What does work well for crypto analysts are simple technical analysis tools like support and resistance points, especially psychological barriers, as well as sentiment, trend, and above all momentum indicators."
"Bitcoin and crypto prices are all about excitement or lack of," said Glen Goodman, a veteran trader and author of investment advice book, The Crypto Trader. "Nobody really knows for sure whether or not bitcoin will become a major store of value like gold or even a new global reserve currency like the dollar. So any news short of an outright global ban of bitcoin tends to have little lasting impact on bitcoin's price.
"For example, China banned initial coin offerings and bitcoin exchanges in September 2017, which was a huge blow as China was the epicenter of crypto development. Yet within a few weeks, bitcoin's price reached another all-time high!"
Volatility has, meanwhile, returned to the bitcoin market recently, with the bitcoin price recording daily moves that appear to mimic moves last seen at the end of 2018. The daily price change for the month of May averages 4.7%, compared with 3.5% in April and 1.1% in March, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.
Earlier this month, however, Indexica found bitcoin has matured as an asset and there had been a "coming of age" for bitcoin over the past few years, based on the study of the language used in thousands of text documents.
Indexica found bitcoin now is being spoken about in the same way as a company stock, with those in the industry increasingly looking ahead to future developments and less back to the heyday of 2017.
This latest research was designed to examine what has caused the wild swings in the bitcoin price by analyzing data from things like news articles and white papers.
The bitcoin price fell sharply before recovering ground over the last year, though attempts to analyse what exactly moves the price have failed.
CoinDesk
"Sadly, it appears that if you want to know what's moving the bitcoin and cryptocurrency markets, we're not the right people to ask," Selbert said. "Though I don't think anyone could make a better attempt than we have."
"The fact that we couldn't find what drove bitcoin, frankly, means that there isn't a predictive signal to be found," Selbert added. "If there was, we would have found it. What is driving bitcoin isn't easily identifiable with any level of statistical confidence."
The bitcoin price rose from under $1,000 per bitcoin to almost $20,000 throughout 2017 before losing more than 80% of its value last year. A partial recovery so far this year has restored some investors' and traders' faith in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies.
The epic 2017 bitcoin bull run is thought to have been triggered by expectations institutional investment in the bitcoin and cryptocurrency market was imminent but when that failed to materialize in the way many thought it would, the market pulled back sharply.
Some think the latest bitcoin price rally over the last few months is down to interest in the cryptocurrency industry from Silicon Valley tech giants, including social network group Facebook.
Forbes Special Offer: Be among the first to get important crypto and blockchain news and information with Forbes Crypto Confidential.
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Wednesday, May 22nd

Today are:

Bitcoin Pizza Day, celebrated mainly by the cryptocurrency community, takes place on the anniversary of the date that cryptocurrency was used to pay for goods for the first time. On May 18, 2010, Laszlo Hanyecz of Florida posted in the bitcointalk.org forum, offering 10,000 bitcoins in exchange for some pizza, saying in part, "I'll pay 10,000 bitcoins for a couple of pizzas.. like maybe 2 large ones so I have some left over for the next day." His call was answered, and on May 22, 2010, he posted, "I just want to report that I successfully traded 10,000 bitcoins for pizza." A teenager named Jeremy Sturdivant, who went by "jercos" on the forum, sent Hanyecz two Papa John's pizzas, and received 10,000 bitcoins in return. Sturdivant paid about $25 for the pizza, and the 10,000 bitcoins he received became valued at $41.
The events of the first Bitcoin Pizza Day were monumental because they paved the way for the use of cryptocurrency in the future. Nine months after the transaction, the worth of the bitcoins totaled $10,000, meaning each bitcoin had the value of a dollar. On the five year anniversary, the value of the 10,000 bitcoins had risen to about $2.4 million. At one point in 2017, the value rose to over $100 million. As of September 2018, a bitcoin is valued at about $6,000, meaning the value of the 10,000 bitcoins used to pay for the pizza would be about $60 million.
The history of bitcoin dates to the early 2000s, when attempts were made to create a cryptocurrency, although none were fully developed. In 2008, a paper titled "Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System" was posted online. The following year, bitcoin became the first cryptocurrency. Its software was made available to the public, and it began being mined. Mining is "the process through which new bitcoins are created and transactions are recorded and verified on the blockchain." With Hanyecz's transaction for goods on the first Bitcoin Pizza Day, bitcoin gained a specific monetary value—up to that point it had only been mined. Rival cryptocurrencies, often known as altcoin, soon emerged. They usually have been created to try to improve an aspect of bitcoin. Early altcoins were Litecoin and Namecoin, and there are now over 1,000.
In 2013, bitcoin's value reached $1,000, but then crashed to about $300. It took a few years to recover. Over time, as it could be spent at more places, bitcoin's popularity continued to grow, as did its value. Time will only tell if the value of bitcoin will continue to rise, but on Bitcoin Pizza Day we can all remember the day the first cryptocurrency transaction for goods took place, and how the value of a transaction for two pizzas once rose to over $100 million.

Canadian Immigrants Day celebrates those who have immigrated to the United States from Canada. Canada is one of the most sparsely populated countries in the world, and most of its inhabitants live within a few hundred miles of its border with the United States. The border is 5,525 miles in length (this includes the border with Alaska) and is the longest border in the world that is not patrolled by military forces. Besides sharing a border, Canada and the United States share many cultural similarities.
Most Canadians immigrate to the United States by getting a green card, which they usually have obtained because they have immediate relatives in the country, or because they are sponsored by an employer there. Canadians migrate to the United States more than they do to any other country. In 1960, about ten percent of the US foreign-born population was Canadian. Although this was down to two percent in 2012, about 800,000 Canadian immigrants lived in the United States at that time.
The first wave of Canadian immigrants arrived in the 1860s; they were largely unskilled and came for factory jobs. A second wave arrived between 1900 and 1930, and were pushed by the discrimination they had faced in employment, education, and because of their religion. Immigration to the United States began to decline after this, as the Canadian economy began to grow after World War II. During the last half of the twentieth century, especially after the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994, there was a diversification of Canadian immigrants which included students, those looking to reunite with their families, educated professionals, and retirees with wishes to move to a warmer climate.

Harvey Milk Day honors gay rights activist Harvey Milk and also focuses on stopping discrimination against gays and lesbians. Harvey Milk was born in Long Island, New York, on May 22, 1930. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, and worked at a Wall Street investment firm for a time afterward, living a closeted gay life at the time. In the early 1960s, his political views were conservative, and he campaigned for Barry Goldwater in 1964. Once he got involved in the New York bohemian theater scene, he began befriending a more avante-garde crowd, and his politics began to shift more progressive. He moved to the San Francisco Bay area in 1969, became involved in the gay social scene, and protested against the Vietnam War. After being fired for participating in an antiwar rally, he returned to New York City in 1970.
After some time working in New York theater, he returned to San Francisco in 1972 and opened a camera shop on Castro Street—the epicenter of the gay community. The following year he ran for a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors for the first time, in part because he thought a tax on small businesses was unfair. He did not win a seat but did manage to finish 10th out of 32 contestants. Afterward, he co-founded the Castro Village Association, which supported gay business owners on Castro Street. He started the Castro Street Fair in 1974, and became known as "Mayor of Castro Street."
He once again lost an election for Board of Supervisors in 1975, and ran for the California State Assembly and was not successful in that bid either. In 1977, he worked to broaden his appeal beyond the gay community, by focusing on taxes, housing, and day-care centers for working mothers. In November 1977, Harvey Milk became the first openly gay person elected to California office, and the first openly gay person elected in a major U.S. city. The rise of Harvey Milk reflected the rise of the gay rights movement across the country, and he was at the forefront of it.
During his tenure in office, Milk pushed for visibility of gay people as well as for social equality. He worked to pass a gay rights ordinance—to ban discrimination in housing, employment, and public accommodations. He spent the summer of 1978 working to defeat Proposition 6—also known as The Briggs Initiative—which would have banned gays and lesbians, or anyone supporting gay rights, from teaching or working in public schools in California. It was defeated at the ballot box that November.
On November 27, 1978, Harvey Milk was assassinated by Dan White, a former Board of Supervisors member, who had resigned a few months earlier and wanted to be reinstated. White first killed San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, and then walked across the building and shot Harvey Milk five times. Dianne Feinstein, who was President of the Board of Supervisors at the time, announced to the press what had taken place. Dan White was convicted of voluntary manslaughter instead of murder, in part because his team used the "Twinkie defense". He was released early and committed suicide in 1985.
Harvey Milk's profile continued to rise after his assassination. In 1982, a biography titled The Mayor of Castro Street was released, bringing Milk's attention to a wider audience. This was followed by an Academy Award-winning documentary, The Times of Harvey Milk, in 1984. Many buildings in California were named after Milk. In 2008, another Academy Award-winning film, Milk, was released. Harvey Milk was posthumously given the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2009. That same year, Harvey Milk Day was established by the California legislature and signed into law by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger on October 11. California schools commemorate Milk with activities, events, and projects, and equal rights are focused on. The Harvey Milk Foundation organizes events worldwide.

Sherlock Holmes Day celebrates Sherlock Holmes and the author who created him, Arthur Conan Doyle, who was born on today's date in 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland. At a young age, Doyle became enthralled by stories his mother told him, which was the spark that eventually would lead him to become a writer. He was sent to a Jesuit preparatory school in England at the age of 9. After a few years, he went on to study at Stonyhurst College, and after graduating in 1876, he went on to pursue a medical degree at the University of Edinburgh. There he met Professor Dr. Joseph Bell, who became his mentor, and later became the inspiration and model for Sherlock Holmes.
While in medical school, Doyle wrote the short stories "The Mystery of Sasassa Valley" and "The American's Tale," the latter of which appeared in London Society magazine. He also worked as a ship surgeon on a whaling ship in the Arctic Circle while in school, which inspired him to write Captain of the Pole Star. After becoming a doctor he moved around for a bit, focusing on his practice, but also continued to write. He also left his Catholic faith and became a Spiritualist. Eventually, he gave up being a doctor and focused solely on his writing and his faith.
Sherlock Holmes and his assistant, Watson, were introduced in the novel A Study in Scarlet, which first appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual in 1887. It was with this novel that Doyle's writing career finally began taking off. Sherlock Holmes, a "consulting detective" who pursued criminals in London, around England, and throughout Europe, has endured as perhaps the most noteworthy detective character of all time. In all, Doyle wrote 60 stories that featured Sherlock Holmes. Some of Doyle's most noteworthy books that include Sherlock Holmes are The Sign of Four, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and The Hound of the Baskervilles.
In 1893, Doyle tried to kill off Holmes in the short story "The Final Problem," because he wanted to focus more on his writing on Spiritualism. His readers weren't happy—20,000 readers even canceled their subscriptions to Strand Magazine, a magazine which Sherlock Holmes stories often appeared in. Eventually, Doyle was convinced to bring Holmes back. He reintroduced him in 1901 in the novel The Hound of Baskervilles, and then brought him back to life in the story "The Adventure of the Empty House" in 1903. One of the reasons he decided to bring him back was so he could use the profits from the stories to help fund his missionary work. The final twelve Sherlock Holmes stories appeared in the 1928 compilation titled The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes.
Besides his works featuring Sherlock Holmes, Doyle wrote other books such as Beyond the City, The Stark Munro Letters, and A Duet with an Occasional Chorus, as well as a series of works on Spiritualism. He was diagnosed with Angina Pectoris towards the end of his life. On July 7, 1930, Arthur Conan Doyle died in his garden with one hand to his chest and one hand holding a flower. The stories of Sherlock Holmes have continued to have been read, and Sherlock has also lived on in theater and film adaptations of his stories. Today we celebrate both Sherlock Holmes and the author who created him!


Happy Celebrating
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Weekly Discussion Thread, October 8th

News:
[There was so many news this week, i hope i will not forget something :-)
Please comment relevant news.]

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[OC] Nineteen thousand

“Whiskey and water. Leave the bottle.”
The bartender produced the required glassware along with a flask of amber fluid, but made no move to open it and continue the procedure. After a few seconds of letting him stare at me, I sighed and dug out a bitcoin spear, twirling it between my fingers letting it drop onto the counter. The bartender performed a magic trick and made it disappear into a reader, eyebrows threatening to climb off his bald head at the number of zeroes on the tiny screen. Cash on the barrelhead always trumped whatever initial impression I made when walking into a new place.
Quick as a wink the previous bottle was replaced with something a bit more top shelf - probably from his private stash - along with a bowl of cashews and dried wasabi peas. I didn’t care, top shelf was probably more than I deserved. Not that I was about to turn down the wasabi peas, mind you - they just weren’t the reason I came here. I was here to drink.
And drink I did. A lot. A sip of whiskey each for those that marched in didn’t make it back out. Nineteen thousand brave men and women who went to the wall and held it, held it hard, just so that the rest of the world could keep on living. Heros each and every one of the, the best and finest soldiers I had ever served with.
All dead. All dead. All because they followed me.
The face that stared back at me from the mirror over the bar looked nothing like the man I remembered. This one had a haunted look of someone who had seen too much and couldn’t sleep afterwards. A man who drank to excess in an effort to forget and was failing miserably at it, but kept trying anyways. A man that led his troops into battle and wound up most of them killed. A man who stumbled out of the war zone, gathered up what was left, and led the charge back in. A man who sacrificed the finest men and women on the planet, but got the job done and lived to talk about it.
I hated the man that looked back at me. I hated the fact he had been showered with medals and commendations and called a goddamn hero. He - I - didn’t deserve any of it. The ones that did got nothing but their name on a wall and an email full of platitudes to their families back home. A pittance to remember someone like Private Alimah Kerr, screaming as she unloaded her service weapon into the face of the thing that was chewing her leg off. Or Specialist Robert Hue who stood his ground as the aliens advanced, refusing to yield until he too disappeared under a wave of slobbering blue-green flesh before finally detonating his remaining grenades.
The finest Humanity had to offer. And nobody to remember them but me and a handful of others that had walked away and then paraded in front of the media. Bastards, each and every one of us. Especially me.
Survivor's guilt, they called it. The shrinks tried to convince me that I wasn’t at fault, but I knew better. They hadn’t been there, up close and personal with the aliens that came pouring through the gateway, howling and screaming for Human blood. Every single last one of them a whirling murder machine, all legs and claws and teeth, a dripping nightmare from the depths of hell. The good thing was they died just as easy as we did - only there was a lot more of them.
The gateway had been yet-another attempt to create a working FTL system. In that regard, it is was a roaring success - and if the creator had survived the initial incursion, he would have won a Nobel Prize. Instead he became xeno chow along with rest of the scientists. The idiot never considered that there might be something waiting for us on the other side, ready to jump through and start fucking things up. Without thinking, he just opened a goddamn doorway to hell and invited the bastards in, leaving the rest of us to fight our way towards the portal and slam the thing shut before something worse came through.
We won, of course. But it was a victory bought and paid for dearly, one bloody step at a time.
I continued to drink, mentally calling out names with each sip. Victoria Smith. Mark Belzar. Sigivald Elwin. Andy Paz. I had memorized each of the nineteen thousand I led into battle and then left behind. Good men and women. I wish I could count myself among them. Instead I was left with nothing but their names and a fat bank account, courtesy of early retirement. That, and the memory of how I had took them right up to the gates of hell and told them to keep going. Their great commanding officer, the one they looked up to and expected to bring them home, safe and sound. But in the end, I wound up escorting them right to the gates of hell. If it made any difference I was right there with them, every step of the way. Lead from the front was always my motto. Do as I do, like this, here, you try. They loved me for it, and I loved them back, all of them. One big trigger-happy family.
I waved at the bartender for another bottle, and he swapped out the empty one for me, setting another decanter of water next to it. I refreshed my glass and snorted at the label. “None Better” it proclaimed, in flowing gold script, winner of the ‘52 international. Perhaps. I couldn’t tell - it all went down the same, burning a line from my mouth to my gut like a tracer bullet. The soft bloom of warmth when it hit was a welcome relief, dulling the pain. If only it could dull the memory of what happened.
We had been out doing maneuvers - mostly a show of force to remind everyone that the UN was serious about keeping the peace - when we got an alert indicating a hostile force at a nearby research complex. The day had been going good and I was pleased with how the troops were performing and gave the order to re-task and take back the facility. I assumed it was yet another terrorist action, a bunch of fucking losers following some jackass who thought he was the seconding coming and wanted to prove it by blowing shit up and lopping off heads. What those guys hope to accomplish by all of that is beyond me. Still, they always seemed to be able to gather supporters from those that had nothing else better to do. I guess vague promises of a glowing afterlife was better than dirty villages and crappy TV.
On the surface it seemed like a run-of-the-mill op, just like all the others that we’ve been doing since the UNSOF was formed. Somehow the insurgents had managed to slip in and take over the lab before anyone noticed - which meant overwatch had been slacking off and needed a kick in the ass. I figured it would all be over pretty soon and the grunts could look forward to some well-deserved R’n’R afterwards while us command-types filled out paperwork. Just another day at the office, one step closer to retirement and that 30-foot boat I’d been daydreaming about. A little shock and awe and everything would be right on our corner of the world. Give the kids something to bullshit the starry-eyed civvies with back in town, maybe enough to impress the locals to come back their place and get all sticky together. I was just glad we mandated strict birth control, religious and cultural affiliations be dammed.
The first indication it was not a terrorist group was when the incursion team breached the outer doors and started screaming. The whirling mass of death that came storming out tore into the team like a starving man at a buffet. To their credit, they stood their ground and gave as good as they got until backup arrived and provided supporting fire, splattering the shit out of whatever it was before recovering our dead and wounded.
I gave the order to move in and secure the facility, assuming that whatever had torn Alpha team to ribbons was some unsanctioned animal experiment that got loose. It was only after we lost both Bravo and Charlie did we realize it wasn’t animals we were dealing with but a whole new life form, one that really enjoyed snacking on humans. By the time the rest of the division showed up to provide much-needed support we were down to less than a hundred functioning soldiers and had nothing to show for it.
The UNSOF trained and outfitted some of the best soldiers on the planet, and we were experts at enforcing the peace or dealing with the odd armed insurgent, but an actual alien invasion was a little outside of our bailiwick. But we were also never one to back down from a fight, especially one where the fate of the world hung in the balance. The extra firepower allowed us to force our way through the swarms of aliens that just kept coming and coming. Sergeant Iva Magdalene joked with Private Sam Lammert that it was like some sort of video game and wondered if there was a boss level. That was the last coherent thing I heard from her team, screaming and the sound of gunfire saturating the radio channel shortly afterwards.
The bar was starting to fill up, the afternoon working class crowd shouldering their way in and talking loud. Friends backslapping each other, yapping about sports or the latest movie or how the new foreman was an idiot. I ignored them and stayed on my perch, nailed there by a continual supply of whiskey and spicy dried peas. I blinked and the empty bottle magically replaced itself, the bartender swapping it out as he moved by. I took that as a good sign and poured myself another, sipping it as I mentally counted out the names.
Afonso Lefteris. Castor Theudemar. Rodrigo Neely. Arcadia Frantziska. Coco Yana. Lesha Teagan. Dan Dorin. Cassandra Goldburg. All gone, just names on a wall somewhere now, destined to be part of a school field trip where bored kids stand around and fidget as their teacher tries to jam some history between their dirty ears. Not one of those kids or their teacher will care Cassandra wrote dirty Harry Potter vampire fan fiction, Rodrigo had been studying to be a lawyer, or that Dan moonlighted as a classical guitarist. Each one had a future and a life ahead of them that was wiped out when I sent them off to die.
And every last one of them went willingly. Confident, strong, proud. A credit to the uniform. A uniform I no longer felt that I had the right to wear.
I set my empty glass down with exaggerated care, uncertain of where the tabletop was, my enhanced liver working overtime to process the influx of alcohol. The thunk told me I had made it successfully, and I let go of the glass and stared into it, the slowly collapsing film of whiskey that clung to the side a reminder of the gateway at the epicenter of the invasion.
The egg-shaped device looked like wet glass, the distortion rippling between complicated armatures keeping the field open. It had taken six hours of constant fighting, some of it hand-to-hand, before we gained access to the chamber housing the gateway. Behind us we had left a trail of bodies, both ours and theirs, some of them stacked three deep. The stench of death mixed with the smell of cordite and burnt railgun coils. I had lost track of my own weapon some point, picking up a discard and using that instead. The stock was crusted in dried blood, some of it mine, most of it alien where I had used it as a club. My continual requests for more support and heavy equipment were being shuffled around and put off, nobody willing to believe the reports being sent in. Those of us on the ground were resolved to end this here and now, holding the first, last, and only line of defence between Humanity and the growling alien mob.
By this point we had all gotten pretty good at figuring out what the alien’s weak points were - head shots fucked them up pretty good, but they’d just barrel along until you took out the heart-thing located in their ass. Someone told me later they were like bees, putting their vital bits in back and responding to a queen. I stopped eating honey right after that.
Being more efficient at killing was not that helpful when the enemy force seemed to have an unlimited supply of bodies to throw at us. At some point we were going to run out of ammo - we had been scavenging what we could off of our dead comrades, exhaustion and terror keeping us from feeling bad about it. I kept sending soldiers out in twos and threes to search the surrounding areas and bring back what they could. Sometimes they came back missing a team member. Sometimes they didn’t come back at all.
I added them to the list of dead that I was responsible for and kept pushing forward.
The bartender came over and gave me a look, judging if I was at the point where he should consider cutting me off. I held out my hand to show that it was steady - surgeon's hands, my mother called them - and nodded, my fancy liver having already dealt with the booze. He reluctantly complied and poured a drink for me from a new bottle - my third, I think - before moving down the bar to take care of someone else.
I kept drinking and counting off the names.
Our first clue we were getting closer to the center of the invasion was a change in the mix of xeno types. Before it was just nasty critters that would attack en-masse, but these were more upright and started to sport weapons of their own. They also started to show a level of unit cohesion that was downright disturbing. We figured out pretty quickly that they were also responsible for directing the mass of smaller xenos, so killing them became a top priority. Same general body layout as the rest, so popping a round in their ass worked wonders.
By this time we had finally figured out what the hell this place was and command had bought into our doomsday scenario - but were seemingly incapable of making a decision on what to do about it. I lost three men - Williams, Carine, and Renáta - as I hunkered down and got into a screaming match over the vidphone with a four-star general who had never seen live action before. It was only until I broke off to club a snarling mass of alien flesh that tried to eat my face did they get the message how dire the situation was. Nuclear weapons were off the table - even if we could get the release codes, the fallout would poison a large chunk of valuable farmland and wreck the underlying aquifer. The only available units with bunker busters or MOABs were hours away, about the same time as any heavy artillery that could punch through the walls.
That left us with jack and shit, along with a dwindling number of functional soldiers who were running short on ammo and adrenaline.
So we did what we were trained to do - we kept fighting.
And kept dying.
My upgraded liver had finally done its job and processed most of what I drank into hydrogen and energy, feeding a process that cracked the rest into more base components my body could use. Very little alcohol actually made it into my bloodstream, and what did was filtered out quickly and excreted in the normal manner. The upshot was I could generally keep drinking for as long as my bank account held out - which these days meant practically forever.
One side effect of the upgrades is that I tend to sweat more than normal when I drink, which is hell on my clothing and contributes to the sad state of my personal hygiene. I honestly don’t care - that’s what laundry service is for. As for the smell, it kept the seats next to me clear, which let me focus on more important things. Like drinking and remembering the dead.
So when someone invaded my personal space by sitting down and greeting me by name, I was totally unprepared.
Fuck. Robbie.
The promised support was going to be a long time in coming - most of what we needed were scattered around maintaining the peace or on a ship somewhere. Nobody expected some idiot to throw a complete division of troops and material into a meat grinder and then ask for more.
We knew we were in the right area when we killed a dozen of the Walkers - what we started calling the upright fighters - all stationed around a hanger-like door that had been forced open from the inside. A quick peek around the corner showed the room inside was filled with critters of various sizes, all milling around the gateway that kept pooping out more. I could see a dozen or more Walkers arranged in front of it, gathered in a loose circle and waving their hand-things around in some sort of ritual fashion. I didn’t know if they were holding a seance and talking with Great Uncle Charley or just discussing the weather, and frankly I didn’t care - I just wanted them out of the way of our objective. Once we shut the gateway down I was certain that all of our problems would be solved and we could call it a day. Maybe even get out this in time for dinner.
“Eugen, Pyotr. Take a squad each and scout left and right of our position. Look for power conduits big enough to power that thing. Sing out if you run into trouble. Go.” Two dozen men and women scampered off without a second thought. “Mansel. You and yours hold here with me. The rest, fan out and grab whatever ammo you can find. Return in five minutes.” Sixty soldiers ran down the hallways in groups of sevens and eights to find whatever they could, coming back within the allotted time. One ran into a pack of xenos and used up what ammo they had, returning empty handed. We parceled out everything the best we could. I kept as many railgun coils as I could carry and handed the rest to Robbie, who had the other functioning railgun. The rest were armed with upgraded SAR29’s and were ready for blood.
Pyotr called in saying they had found a power cable that looked promising - it was certainly big enough and had warnings in six languages. Eugen hadn’t reported in and wasn’t responding to coms. I was hoping it was just because their radio was broken or the signal was blocked, but we all knew in our guts they were gone. More names to add to the list of brave men and women I had sent off to die.
I ordered Pytor to cut the cable, which should shut down the gateway and prevent the aliens from bringing in any more reinforcements. As soon as that happened we were going to storm the room and kill every last stinking xeno. No survivors, and no Geneva convention to tell us different.
It sorta kinda worked.
“Whatcha drinking, Colonel?” Robbie asked me, as if everything was normal and it was just another day in the neighborhood. The rest of the bar hooted and hollered, someone sinking a clever shot on the pool table.
“Whiskey. Get’cher own,” I growled back, taking a drink and pretending to ignore his presence. I was in no mood to share, particularly not with him. “And I’m retired.”
The last time I had seen Robbie he was missing a hand along with a chunk of his face. The surgeons had done a good job on patching him back together. Hell, they had done a good job on everyone that made it out, myself included. They had to - if they showed the world what it really took to beat back an alien invasion, recruitment numbers would plummet to near zero. So broken bones were set, mangled limbs and organs were repaired or replaced, plastic surgery was scheduled. The scars were erased, but for some of us, they went too deep for any amount of medical care to fix. On the surface we looked and acted human, but inside some of us were more plastic and ceramic and high-tech gear than flesh and bone. But we looked good on TV, which is what really mattered.
Robbie signaled for a beer, which the bartender obliged. “Put it on his tab,” he said, jerking a thumb at me. “He doesn’t mind.”
“What do you want, Robbie?” I asked, waving a hand at the bartender to say it was okay. “Not like we parted friends last time I checked.” Words were exchanged, most of them heated. We didn’t come to blows, but damn near could’ve.
“Things change. You were angry, blaming yourself for everything that happened.” Pointing at the line of empty bottles, he added, “looks like you still do.” I grunted in agreement and continued to drink. Robbie wouldn’t shut up and kept at it. “Still doing that thing where you go over the names of everyone that didn’t make it out?” I turned my head slowly towards Robbie, fixing him with a hostile stare. It was his turn to ignore me and he blathered on. “What’s the count again? Oh yes, nineteen thousand. I hear they are going to make a documentary. Want to be in it? They can use a sad sack of shit. Be right up your alley.” He shut up and took a drink from his beer, not realizing the amount of control it took not to punch his smug face in.
I thought he was done talking but he started right back up again. “Believe it or not, I have been and always will be your friend. Maybe you forgot that, but I never did. Which is why when you walked away I didn’t, even if I wanted to. Someone had to stick around and pick up the slack. So while you’ve been drinking more than humanly possible and blaming yourself, I - we’ve - have been figuring out what happened.”
“I know what happened. We went in and got blown to hell,” I answered, lifting my glass. “Most of a division wiped out on my orders. But we got the job done.”
Robbie hit me with a sucker punch. “Who said the job was done?”
Pytor’s team took down the power cable as ordered and we came in guns blazing. The gateway was going crazy from all of the ordinance flying around and its power supply being interrupted, but it wasn’t shutting down. Either there was a secondary conduit somewhere or a backup generator providing juice. I had a momentary worry that whatever ritual the Walkers had been doing was keeping it open, but they wasted no time in jumping into the fray, dispelling that notion.
Our first order of business was taking the Walkers out - without them providing guidance, the rest of the xeno swarm should be easy. Great idea, but they weren’t going down without a fight.
Robbie and I fought back-to-back, railguns close to overload as we fired round after round, punching through aliens four at a time. The rest of the remaining company of soldiers burned through ammo like it was going out of style. Someone yelling “grenade!” caused us all to duck, the bang of it going off followed by the whistling sound of shrapnel and someone screaming. Turns out it was me. A chunk of metal made it past my armor and lodged in my gut, tearing things up pretty bad.
“Power souce!” I called out, doing my best to ignore the pain and stay upright. “Find the goddamn power source!”
And incoherent shout drew my attention to Corporal Mahmud Paz, who was pointing at a unit mounted on the far side of the bay that was being guarded by three Walkers and a bunch of their pets. That looked like a fine place to have some target practice, and anyone who wasn’t directly engaged with staying alive moved in closer.
Before we got there something came through and started to tear us a new asshole. Robbie and I ganged up on it and turned it into Swiss cheese, but not before it had wiped out twenty men and women we couldn’t afford to lose.
“We’re fucked!” he gasped, the side of his face that wasn’t hamburger pale from blood loss. I was inclined to agree, but wasn’t ready to throw in the towel just yet.
“No we’re not,” I said with confidence I didn’t really have, eyes tracing the line of wrist-thick cables going from the generator to the arms of the still-functioning gateway. “There. Hit it there,” I ordered over the command channel, lighting up a junction with the laser targeting system. I followed through by reloading a coil and chunking off rounds, the railgun rapidly warming up in my hands, heading towards a critical overload.
The remaining troops did the same, just as the Walkers realized they were about to be cut off from whatever hell they called home and broke ranks to try and stop us. Robbie’s railgun failed after five more rounds, the final shot warping the barrel and exploding, taking his right hand with it. The rest of us kept firing, spraying and praying we’d finally punch through and hit something important.
Eventually we did.
“Of course I am. Shut the gateway down, killed all the xenos, exfil’d back to base. World saved, all that jazz.” I took a big slug of whiskey and poured some more, skipping the water this time around. “You were there as I recall. Didn’t look as good as you do now.”
“The miracle of modern medicine. So here’s the deal. We managed to salvage the research and rebuild the gateway. Now hold on, lemme finish. Smaller this time, lower power, double isolation chamber, failsafes, the works. Just big enough for some probes to go through without being detected. Guess what we found?”
“Your virginity?”
“Close, but no cigar. Worlds. Hundreds of worlds. And on all of them, dead civilizations, wiped out by the sames bastards that attacked us. Research managed to translate some of what they found and figured out that every time a species build a gateway, these things come through and wipe them out.”
“But not us,” I grunted.
“But not us. And it gets better.” Robbie looked around and leaned over slightly before continuing in a lower voice, like he was imparting some great secret. “We found their home world.”
The Walkers and their remaining pets tore into us just as the power junction let go, causing the gateway to collapse in a soundless explosion of light and fury. The best part was that it sent the aliens reeling, making them easy pickings. By the time our reinforcements arrived we had bandaged our wounded and crawled out of the rubble, seventy three survivors out of a division of almost twenty thousand.
Fresh air never smelled so good.
I fully expected to be court-marshaled for taking such devastating losses and not calling for a retreat. Instead what I got was commendation after commendation, so many they had to create new combos just so I wouldn’t run out of chest area to display them all. I suspected that it was all a put-up job, but couldn’t get anyone to admit it. Everyone kept telling me how great I was and how I had done the impossible against incredible odds. I had so much smoke blown up my ass I thought I would get lung cancer. After a while I couldn’t take it anymore and turned in my paperwork and resigned, leaving the uniform and the job behind - the only thing I had known for most of my adult life.
I never did buy that boat.
“Explain,” I ordered, giving Robbie my best Don’t Fuck With Me glare. He pretended it didn’t work on him but answered anyways.
“Just like I said. We found the planet they come from. Easy, too. If you don’t know enough to plan ahead the gateway naturally lands there, like a default setting. Then our buddies swarm through, kill everyone, and leave. Lather, rinse, repeat. Break the laws of physics, get eaten.”
“Well that sucks,” I observed, taking a pull from my glass. “But you never answered my question, Robbie. What do you want?”
“We - I - want you. We’re building a bigger gate, one that can send a division or three through. We want to take the fight to them, wipe them out for good before they can do the same to another species. Give the rest of the universe a chance to get off their own rocks and make something of themselves.” Robbie cleared his throat before continuing, “but we need a leader. One that can make the hard choices even if it tears him up inside. One that keeps going and going, putting his ass on the line every single day and inspiring others to do the same. One who knows how to fight these things and win. No matter what it takes. No matter what it costs him personally.”
Robbie put his hand on the top of my glass, and forced it back down to the counter top. “How about it, Colonel? Wanna get some payback? Maybe make those names of yours mean something other than an excuse to wallow in your self-pity?” I didn’t say anything and stared at the reflection of the man in the mirror. “Don’t do it for me. Hell, don’t do it for yourself. Do it for them. For the nineteen thousand. Make their deaths be more than just names on a wall somewhere or a glass in your hand. Don’t walk away this time and hide in a bottle,” he pleaded, hand still covering mine and holding the glass of liquid memory eraser on the countertop.
As I watched, my reflection shifted for a moment, showing me the man I used to be. A man deeply ashamed at what he had become - a drunk, a loser. A man that thought there might be something still inside worth saving, who had never really given up on either of us or what we had once believed in. A man who wanted a second chance to make up for his mistakes.
“Weapons?” I asked, my voice quiet and lost in the background noise of the bar. I had hoped Robbie didn’t hear, but they must have fixed his ears, too.
“New SAR31’s. Better fire control, larger magazines, bigger punch. Railguns have been improved, too. No more losing fingers,” he said, waving his replacement hand around, the synthflesh blending seamlessly into his wrist. “Got some prototype plasma casters that look promising, if you want’em.”
“Armor?” louder this time. No use pretending any more.
“Dragonskin v8. Interlocking plates. Takes a licking and keeps on ticking. Carry weight has been dropped by half, more flexible. Think chainmail that’ll stop a rocket.”
I stared at the mirror. “Resupply? Air support?”
“Done and done. Trust me, I was your XO for six years before you walked away. I know what you’re going to ask before you ask it. We’re locked, cocked, and ready to roll. Only thing missing is you. The key part to the whole shebang.”
I drummed my fingers on the countertop, trying to think of something to trip him up, and give me an excuse to say no. The bottles called out to me, and I really wanted to get back to my drinking. I finally played my ace card and said, “fine, but I want Kitty,” referring to the best damn sniper I had ever had the pleasure to work with. The last time I spoke to her she was happily retired and living on a beach, having traded in her scope for an endless supply of cabana boys and surfers. She was out for good, no way in hell Robbie had managed to lure her back in.
Robbie threw back his head and laughed, attracting the attention of the entire bar and proving me wrong. “Deal! She’s tanned, toned, and ready to kick ass. Even brought some promising new recruits with her. So what do you say Colonel, ready to get back to work? Maybe bring some peace to the universe, make a real difference again?”
The names were a silent presence, floating around in the back of my mind. I realized in that moment of pure absolute clarity that I had been wrong, so very wrong. The names of the men and women that had followed me to hell and stayed there were not a burden or a curse but a blessing. They had not been dragging me down or holding me back - I had. They were there to lift me up, keep me going, push me forwards. Knowing each one of them had been an honor, and I would never forget their sacrifice.
I shoved Robbie’s hand off the glass and tossed it back before standing up and giving the mirror the evil eye. My reflection looked back at me, pleased for the first time in ages. I made a silent vow to carry the memories of those men and women to the farthest reaches of the universe and make their deaths count by tearing the xeno homeworld down, brick by bloody brick, until the galaxy was free from the threat they posed. I could feel the names, all nineteen thousand of them, milling around, tired of excuses and eager to get on with it.
Nineteen thousand. Plus one more.
Mine.
submitted by j1xwnbsr to HFY [link] [comments]

[Announcement] Ethereum Developer Conference in Berlin - 19th & 20th of July 2018

Berlin has emerged as one of the most vibrant blockchain ecosystems globally. Many well-known developers and projects both mature and new have chosen it as their home: The first Ethereum office was created here—just a few months after the Ethereum token sale. Berlin is the city where Solidity was written; and where critical Bitcoin infrastructure was partly developed as well. No wonder that Devcon0 had to kick off in Kreuzberg!
What we found to be still somewhat missing here, however, are conferences with a strong focus on the core technology itself—organized by developers for developers. So we at Gnosis decided to host our own:
DappCon Berlin - Developer Conference for Ethereum DApps and Infrastructure
Where and when?
The venue is a former train station providing space for 800 people with two stages, one workshop room, and a large outside garden area to enjoy the Berlin summer while networking.
In a series of panel discussions, presentations, and workshops, DappCon attendees will get a chance to hear about and discuss different governance mechanisms, usability and security of self-sovereign authentication models, as well as next steps in the development of decentralized exchanges.
Who is organizing DappCon?
A ConsenSys spoke that was spun out to become a fully-fledged company early 2017, Gnosis builds new market mechanisms to enable the distribution of resources—from assets to incentives, and information to ideas. Their decentralized platforms and applications provide foundational infrastructure, assuring security, stability, and foresight for the longevity of blockchain-driven technologies.
To bring this technology to the next level and unite the burgeoning Ethereum community in one place, we at Gnosis were motivated to organize a conference for developers, putting a strong focus on Ethereum's core technology. At the same time, we're also encouraging those who aren't part of the ecosystem just yet but would like to contribute in the future—we sell student tickets for only 25€. Although the tickets will be sold at cost, any eventual benefits will be allocated to future conferences, workshops, and community projects.
Why should you attend DappCon?
The multiple streams will fit different areas of interest—from governance, Token Curated Registries (TCRs), scalability, to identity and decentralized exchanges. We are also offering hands-on workshops on DApp development and tooling, featuring smart contract security, solidity, node infrastructure, and more.
Confirmed speakers/attendees
Jarrad Hope (Co-founder, Status), Matan Field (CEO, DAOstack), Heiko Hees (CEO, Brainbot), Joseph Lubin (Founder, ConsenSys), Alex van de Sande (UX Designer, Ethereum Foundation), Mona El Isa (CEO, Melonport), Yaron Velner (CTO, Kyber Network), Edmund Edgar (Founder, Reality Keys), Alexey Akhunov (Independent Researcher), Lefteris Karapetsas (Senior Software Engineer, Brainbot - RaidenNetwork), Peter Czaban (Executive Director, Web3 Foundation), Julian Zawistowski (CEO, Golem), Brian Fabian Crain (Co-Founder, Epicenter Podcast), and many more
Berlin is calling—see you in July! <3
If you have any questions or suggestions, please don't hesitate to get in touch [[email protected]]
submitted by GnosisPM to ethereum [link] [comments]

iExec Token Crowdsale Rescheduled to 19th April to Optimize Smart Contract Security

We have taken the decision today to reschedule our RLC token crowdsale to the 19th April 2017 at 13:00 UTC.
The security of your funds is our first priority. To date, we have open sourced the contract, described the security architecture of the crowdsale platform and the code has gone through several internal and external security audits and tests. Open Zeppelin has also openly published the security review of the smart contract, in which no critical errors or vulnerabilities were found, and we have thoroughly applied all their recommendations.
However, we want to go deeper into the process by launching a bug bounty program.
You may be aware that a bug was discovered last week associated with Ethereum that affected the way that tokens are handled by exchanges. In order to ensure the highest levels of security we have decided to push the crowdsale launch back one week to allow time to undertake a more thorough auditing process.
We are committed to our project supporters and to delivering a great product to them — ensuring there is zero risk to crowdsale participants is part of that commitment. So we ask you to bear with us until Wed 19th April.
If you have some programming skills you are invited to participate in our bug bounty program by joining our slack. We reward 50.000 RLC (10BTC) for anyone finding critical vulnerabilities that would prevent the crowdsale to execute correctly.
In the meantime, we will continue to strengthen our presence across the community during this additional week. This includes an interview that we have been looking forward to with Epicenter Bitcoin.
Join our crowdsale on 19th April and help launch the future of cloud computing!
submitted by BitcoinUKMedia to ethtrader [link] [comments]

List of sources for Stellar's potential transactions/second capacity

Compare these numbers to:
Full list with sources, links, images, and quotes: https://www.lumenauts.com/blog/how-many-transactions-per-second-can-stellar-process
submitted by yodayoungling to Stellar [link] [comments]

Republic Protocol All-In-One Thread

Republic Protocol

 
What is Republic Protocol?
Republic Protocol is a decentralized dark pool exchange protocol, for trading large volumes of tokens.
It is a decentralized network that utilizes secure multi-party computation to match orders without exposing the price, or volume, of the orders. Dark pool exchanges powered by Republic Protocol can support large volume trades, with minimal price slippage and market impact, whilst guaranteeing that the rules of the dark pool cannot be broken.
 
Official Sources
Mainnet
Testnet
The Team
  • Taiyang Zhang (CEO)
  • Loong Wang (CTO)
  • Noah Ingham (Developer)
  • Susruth Nadimpalli (Developer)
  • Yunshi Sun (Developer)
  • Jaz Gulati (Developer)
  • Divya Koshy (Developer)
  • Vincent Au (Developer)
  • Pfalzgraf Martin (Developer)
  • Ross Pure (Research)
  • Vincent Ward (Designer)
  • Darren Toh (Legal, Admin & Comms)
  • Hugh Greethead (Community)
  • Michael Burgess (Liquidity)
     
Republic Protocol Linkedin Page
 
Advisors
 
Investors
  • Polychain Capital
  • FBG Capital
  • Huobi Capital
  • Signum Capital
  • HyperChain Capital
  • BlockVC
  • ZhenFund
  • BlockAsset
  • Signal Ventures
  • Binary Financial
     
Formal Updates
 
Other Posts
 
Developer Roundup Summaries
 
Press Coverage
 
Youtube videos/Podcasts
 
Research
 
Exchanges
 
Wallet
FAQ
Republic Protocol Help Centre
Darknode Information and Manuals

Closing Thoughts

We truly appreciate our community, and this cannot be said enough. The level of technical understanding and subsequent assistance provided to our newcomers, speaks to the expertise and positivity in the community, and we couldn’t be more thankful. We look forward to collaborating with everyone as we move forward to make Republic Protocol the premier decentralized dark pool protocol.
 
If you are interested in working on the Republic Protocol we are also always looking for developers and marketers, contact [email protected] and attach details of any relevant experience.
-Need help? [email protected]
-Have an interesting partnership? [email protected]
 
The latest project updates can be found on our Medium page, take a look at: https://medium.com/republicprotocol
submitted by hgmarral to republicprotocol [link] [comments]

EB140 – Manfred Karrer: Bitsquare - The Decentralized Open-Soure Cryptocurrency-Fiat Exchange EB60 - Robert Sams: Bitcoin, Volatility and the Search for a Stable Cryptocurrency TGIF! Live Bitcoin Analysis and Trading - Interviews - Live at Epicenter SF Blockchain Week 2019! Charlie Shrem: The Untold Story of a Bitcoin Pioneer and Renegade (#321) Epicenter Podcast - YouTube

That the bitcoin price is highly volatile is no secret. Opinions differ on whether that is just an inevitable roadblock to be passed on the way to world domination or whether it represents a fundamental flaw that will prevent Bitcoin from ever achieving widespread use as a medium-of-exchange. Seasoned hedge fund trader and monetary systems […] Epicenter - Learn about Crypto, Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies podcast on demand - Epicenter brings you in-depth conversations about the technical, economic and social implications of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technologies. Every week, we interview business leaders, engineers academics and entrepreneurs, and bring you a... The conversation starts at the Epicenter. undefined. undefined × We use cookies to improve the experience, here is our policy. Got it! Episodes. Guests. Blog. About. Contact. Advertise. Start typing... subscribe. Episodes ← All episodes. #exchanges. 34 Episodes Episode 315 #altcoins. #cryptoassets. Episode 315 Viktor Radchenko Trust Wallet – Building and Growing the Official Binance ... Within a matter of moments, Bitcoin price suddenly surged 8.68 percent from $4,554 to $4,951 over a short 10-minute period. This is by no means the first time that we’ve seen Bitcoin price react sharply to a sudden injection of USDT tokens on the Bitfinex exchange. Epicenter Bitcoin. Tuesdays at 1 pm est. Epicenter Bitcoin is a show about the technologies, projects & startups driving decentralization and the global cryptocurrency revolution. Every week, hosts Brian Fabian Crain and Sébastien Couture talk to some of the most influential people in the cryptocurrency space about their projects and get their perspectives on recent events. Their guests ...

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EB140 – Manfred Karrer: Bitsquare - The Decentralized Open-Soure Cryptocurrency-Fiat Exchange

On October 1st, we launched our first Cryptocurrency and Innovation depot at the Nu World Epicenter. We lauched our coin and Innovation Depot by an Xchange GALA Event. Please Enjoy the video about ... bitsquare Bitcoin crypto exchange blocksize. Loading... Unsubscribe from blocksize? ... Epicenter Podcast 1,765 views. 1:04:12. Top 5 Ways to Buy Bitcoin Without ID - Duration: 3:17. Amanda B ... Epicenter Bitcoin is hosted by Brian Fabian Crain & Sébastien Couture. ... #5 2015: The year of the decentralized bitcoin exchange - Duration: 19:03. BitShares TV 4,096 views. 19:03. EB63 – Tim ... Epicenter is a podcast which takes you to heart of perhaps the most important technological revolution of our time, the rise of decentralized technologies. A... Exchanges are often criticized as a central point of failure of the cryptocurrency space. This isn't without justification as, in recent years, we have seen a number of exchanges get hacked ...

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