Download - Bitcoin - Bitcoin Core :: Bitcoin

Groestlcoin June Development Update & Release!

Another Quarter, Another Release! The Groestlcoin production factory has been working overtime as always in order to deliver even more tech to push Groestlcoin mainstream when the time comes.
There have been many new fantastic wallets and exchanges added to Groestlcoins repertoire over the past 3 months so we will re-cap these before moving on to what is new today.

Recap

What's New

Re-forged: Groestlcoin Samourai

Groestlcoin Samourai is a wallet for the streets. A modern Groestlcoin wallet hand-forged to keep your transactions private, your identity masked, and your funds secure. Its main advantages are its extreme portability and is the most secure Groestlcoin mobile HD wallet.
We've built a wallet that Groestlcoin deserves. If you are looking for a wallet that Silicon Valley will never build, the regulators will never allow, and the VC's will never invest in, this is the perfect wallet for you.
![Groestlcoin Samourai Release Video](http://img.youtube.com/vi/i3WU8Tde8XQ/0.jpg)

Head over to the Groestlcoin Samourai Release Page here for the full release announcement.

New: GroestlImage

Groestlimage turns any file into a mnemonic phrase allowing users to generate Groestlcoin private keys and addresses based on the data URI of the provided file. A picture is worth a thousand Groestls.

Features:

Link

https://groestlcoin.org/groestlimage/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlimage

New: Groestlcoin Core Config Generator

Groestlcoin Core Config Generator is a simple GUI to configure the groestlcoin.conf file – A developers dream tool!
Each configuration option is available via the user interface, grouped by what attributes they affect. For ease of getting started with a new configuration, a variety of preset "node classes" are available on the right-hand-side of the screen. Selecting a preset will load our recommended base configuration for a node fitting that description, at which point you can then tune the configuration at the single option level.

Features

Link

https://config.groestlcoin.org/

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/groestlcoin-core-config-generator

New: Groestlcoin Dumb Block Explorer

Dumb Block Explorer is a trivial block explorer written in a single PHP file. Now everybody can run their own block explorer.

Features

Link

https://www.groestlcoin.org/explore

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/dumb-block-explorer

New: Groestlcoin SMS Push TX

Groestlcoin Simple Push TX is a server to push Groestlcoin transactions via SMS. Now everybody can send new transactions via SMS if the Internet is not usable (i.e. blocked by government entities or becomes otherwise unavailable).

Features

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/smspushtx

Update: Electrum-GRS 3.3.6

Electrum-GRS is Groestlcoins #1 thin-client for Windows, MacOS, Linux and Android, based on a client-server protocol. Supporting multi-sig wallets without the bloat of downloading the entire blockchain.

New Features (Universal)

New Features (Windows, MacOS, Linux)

New Features (Android)

Link

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs/releases/download
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.groestlcoin.electrumgrs

Source Code

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/electrum-grs
submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

IRC Log from Ravencoin Open Developer Meeting - Aug 24, 2018

[14:05] <@wolfsokta> Hello Everybody, sorry we're a bit late getting started
[14:05] == block_338778 [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.72.214.222.226] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:06] <@wolfsokta> Here are the topics we would like to cover today • 2.0.4 Need to upgrade - What we have done to communicate to the community • Unique Assets • iOS Wallet • General Q&A
[14:06] == Chatturga changed the topic of #ravencoin-dev to: 2.0.4 Need to upgrade - What we have done to communicate to the community • Unique Assets • iOS Wallet • General Q&A
[14:06] <@wolfsokta> Daben, could you mention what we have done to communicate the need for the 2.0.4 upgrade?
[14:07] == hwhwhsushwban [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.172.58.37.35] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:07] <@wolfsokta> Others here are free to chime in where they saw the message first.
[14:07] == hwhwhsushwban [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.172.58.37.35] has quit [Client Quit]
[14:08] Whats up bois
[14:08] hi everyone
[14:08] hi hi
[14:08] <@wolfsokta> Discussing the 2.0.4 update and the need to upgrade.
[14:08] <@Chatturga> Sure. As most of you are aware, the community has been expressing concerns with the difficulty oscillations, and were asking that something be done to the difficulty retargeting. Many people submitted suggestions, and the devs decided to implement DGW.
[14:09] <@Tron> I wrote up a short description of why we're moving to a new difficulty adjustment. https://medium.com/@tronblack/ravencoin-dark-gravity-wave-1da0a71657f7
[14:09] <@Chatturga> I have made posts on discord, telegram, bitcointalk, reddit, and ravencointalk.org from testnet stages through current.
[14:10] <@Chatturga> If there are any other channels that can reach a large number of community members, I would love to have more.
[14:10] <@wolfsokta> Thanks Tron, that hasn't been shared to the community at large yet, but folks feel free to share it.
[14:10] When was this decision made and by whom and how?
[14:10] <@Chatturga> I have also communicated with the pool operators and exchanges about the update. Of all of the current pools, only 2 have not yet updated versions.
[14:11] <@wolfsokta> The decision was made by the developers through ongoing requests for weeks made by the community.
[14:12] <@wolfsokta> Evidence was provided by the community of the damages that could be caused to projects when the wild swings continue.
[14:12] So was there a meeting or vote? How can people get invited
[14:12] <@Tron> It was also informed by my conversations with some miners that recommended that we make the change before the coin died. They witnessed similar oscillations from which other coins never recovered.
[14:13] only two pools left to upgrade is good, what about the exchanges? Any word on how many of those have/have not upgraded?
[14:13] <@wolfsokta> We talked about here in our last meeting Bruce_. All attendees were asked if they had any questions or concerns.
[14:13] == blondfrogs [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.185.245.87.219] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:13] == roshii [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.41.251.25.100] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:13] sup roshii long time no see
[14:14] <@Chatturga> Bittrex, Cryptopia, and IDCM have all either updated or have announced their intent to update.
[14:14] == wjcgiwgu283ik3cj [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.172.58.37.35] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:15] sup russki
[14:15] what's the status here?
[14:15] I don’t think that was at all clear from the last dev meeting
[14:15] I can’t be the only person who didn’t understand it
[14:15] <@wolfsokta> Are there any suggestions on how to communicate the need to upgrade even further? I am concerned that others might also not understand.
[14:17] I’m not sold on the benefit and don’t understand the need for a hard fork — I think it’s a bad precedent to simply go rally exchanges to support a hard fork with little to no discussion
[14:17] so just to note, the exchanges not listed as being upgraded or have announced their intention to upgrade include: qbtc, upbit, and cryptobridge (all with over $40k usd volume past 24 hours according to coinmarketcap)
[14:18] <@wolfsokta> I don't agree that there was little or no discussion at all.
[14:19] <@wolfsokta> Looking back at our meeting notes from two weeks ago "fork" was specifically asked about by BrianMCT.
[14:19] If individual devs have the power to simple decide to do something as drastic as a hard fork and can get exchanges and miners to do it that’s got a lot of issues with centralization
[14:19] <@wolfsokta> It had been implemented on testnet by then and discussed in the community for several weeks before that.
[14:19] == under [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.72.200.168.56] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:19] howdy
[14:19] Everything I’ve seen has been related to the asset layer
[14:19] I have to agree with Bruce_, though I wasn't able to join the last meeting here. That said I support the fork
[14:20] Which devs made this decision to do a fork and how was it communicated?
[14:20] well mostly the community made the decision
[14:20] Consensus on a change is the heart of bitcoin development and I believe the devs have done a great job building that consensus
[14:20] a lot of miners were in uproar about the situation
[14:20] <@wolfsokta> All of the devs were supporting the changes. It wasn't done in isolation at all.
[14:21] This topic has been a huge discussion point within the RVN mining community for quite some time
[14:21] the community and miners have been having issues with the way diff is adjusted for quite some time now
[14:21] Sure I’m well aware of that -
[14:21] Not sold on the benefits of having difficulty crippled by rented hashpower?
[14:21] The community saw a problem. The devs got together and talked about a solution and implemented a solution
[14:21] I’m active in the community
[14:22] So well aware of the discussions on DGW etc
[14:22] Hard fork as a solution to a problem community had with rented hashpower (nicehash!!) sounds like the perfect decentralized scenario!
[14:23] hard forks are very dangerous
[14:23] mining parties in difficulty drops are too
[14:23] <@wolfsokta> Agreed, we want to keep them to an absolute minimum.
[14:23] But miners motivation it’s the main vote
[14:24] What would it take to convince you that constantly going from 4 Th/s to 500 Gh/s every week is worse for the long term health of the coin than the risk of a hard fork to fix it?
[14:24] == Tron [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.173.241.144.77] has quit [Ping timeout: 252 seconds]
[14:24] This hardfork does include the asset layer right? if so why is it being delayed in implementation?
[14:24] <@wolfsokta> Come back Tron!
[14:24] coudl it have been implement through bip9 voting?
[14:24] also hard fork is activated by the community! that's a vote thing!
[14:24] @mrsushi to give people time to upgrade their wallet
[14:25] @under, it would be much hard to keep consensus with a bip9 change
[14:25] <@wolfsokta> We investigated that closely Under.
[14:25] == Tron [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.173.241.144.77] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:25] <@wolfsokta> See Tron's post for more details about that.
[14:25] <@spyder_> Hi Tron
[14:25] <@wolfsokta> https://medium.com/@tronblack/ravencoin-dark-gravity-wave-1da0a71657f7
[14:25] Sorry about that. Computer went to sleep.
[14:26] I'm wrong
[14:26] 2 cents. the release deadline of october 31st puts a bit of strain on getting code shipped. (duh). but fixing daa was important to the current health of the coin, and was widely suppported by current mining majority commuity. could it have been implemented in a different manner? yes . if we didnt have deadlines
[14:27] == wjcgiwgu283ik3cj [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.172.58.37.35] has quit [Quit: Page closed]
[14:27] sushi this fork does not include assets. it's not being delayed though, we're making great progress for an Oct 31 target
[14:28] I don’t see the urgency but my vote doesn’t matter since my hash power is still CPUs
[14:28] <@wolfsokta> We're seeing the community get behind the change as well based on the amount of people jumping back in to mine through this last high difficulty phase.
[14:28] So that will be another hardfork?
[14:28] the fork does include the asset code though set to activate on oct 30th
[14:28] yes
[14:29] <@wolfsokta> Yes, it will based on the upgrade voting through the BIP9 process.
[14:29] I wanted to ask about burn rates from this group: and make a proposal.
[14:29] we're also trying hard to make it the last for awhile
[14:29] Can you clear up the above — there will be this one and another hard fork?
[14:29] <@wolfsokta> Okay, we could discuss that under towards the end of the meeting.
[14:30] If this one has the asset layer is there something different set for October
[14:30] <@wolfsokta> Yes, there will be another hard fork on October 31st once the voting process is successful.
[14:31] <@wolfsokta> The code is in 2.0.4 now and assets are active on testnet
[14:31] Bruce, the assets layer is still being worked on. Assets is active on mainnet. So in Oct 31 voting will start. and if it passes, the chain will fork.
[14:31] this one does NOT include assets for mainnet Bruce -- assets are targeted for Oct 31
[14:31] not***
[14:31] not active****
[14:31] correct me if I'm wrong here, but if everyone upgrades to 2.0.4 for this fork this week, the vote will automatically pass on oct 31st correct? nothing else needs to be done
[14:31] Will if need another download or does this software download cover both forks?
[14:31] <@wolfsokta> Correct Urgo
[14:32] thats how the testnet got activated and this one shows "asset activation status: waiting until 10/30/2018 20:00 (ET)"
[14:32] Will require another upgrade before Oct 31
[14:32] thank you for the clarification wolfsokta
[14:32] <@wolfsokta> It covers both forks, but we might have additional bug fixes in later releases.
[14:32] So users DL one version now and another one around October 30 which activates after that basically?
[14:33] I understand that, but I just wanted to make it clear that if people upgrade to this version for this fork and then don't do anything, they are also voting for the fork on oct 31st
[14:33] Oh okay — one DL?
[14:33] Bruce, Yes.
[14:33] Ty
[14:33] well there is the issue that there maybe some further consensus bugs dealing with the pruneability of asset transactions that needs to be corrected between 2.0.4 and mainnet. so i would imagine that there will be further revisions required to upgrade before now and october 31
[14:33] @under that is correct.
[14:34] I would highly recommend bumping the semver up to 3.0.0 for the final pre 31st release so that the public know to definitely upgrade
[14:34] @under +1
[14:35] out of curiosity, have there been many bugs found with the assets from the version released in july for testnet (2.0.3) until this version? or is it solely a change to DGW?
[14:35] <@wolfsokta> That's not a bad idea under.
[14:35] <@spyder_> @under good idea
[14:35] @urgo. Bugs are being found and fixed daily.
[14:35] Any time the protocol needs to change, there would need to be a hard fork (aka upgrade). It is our hope that we can activate feature forks through the BIP process (as we are doing for assets). Mining pools and exchanges will need to be on the newest software at the point of asset activation - should the mining hash power vote for assets.
[14:35] blondfrogs: gotcha
[14:35] There have been bugs found (and fixed). Testing continues. We appreciate all the bug reports you can give us.
[14:36] <@wolfsokta> Yes! Thank you all for your help in the community.
[14:37] (pull requests with fixes and test coverage would be even better!)
[14:37] asset creation collision is another major issue. current unfair advantage or nodes that fore connect to mining pools will have network topologies that guarantee acceptance. I had discussed the possibility of fee based asset creation selection and i feel that would be a more equal playing ground for all users
[14:38] *of nodes that force
[14:38] <@wolfsokta> What cfox said, we will always welcome development help.
[14:38] So just to make sure everyone know. When assets is ready to go live on oct 31st. Everyone that wants to be on the assets chain without any problems will have to download the new binary.
[14:39] <@wolfsokta> The latest binary.
[14:39] under: already in the works
[14:39] excellent to hear
[14:39] == UserJonPizza [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.24.218.60.237] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:39] <@wolfsokta> Okay, we've spent a bunch of time on that topic and I think it was needed. Does anybody have any other suggestions on how to get the word out even more?
[14:40] maybe preface all 2.0.X releases as pre-releases... minimize the number of releases between now and 3.0 etc
[14:41] <@wolfsokta> Bruce_ let's discuss further offline.
[14:41] wolfsokta: which are the remaining two pools that need to be upgraded? I've identified qbtc, upbit, and cryptobridge as high volume exchanges that haven't said they were going to do it yet
[14:41] so people can help reach out to them
[14:41] f2pool is notoriously hard to contact
[14:41] are they on board?
[14:42] <@wolfsokta> We could use help reaching out to QBTC and Graviex
[14:42] I can try to contact CB if you want?
[14:42] <@Chatturga> The remaining pools are Ravenminer and PickAxePro.
[14:42] <@Chatturga> I have spoken with their operators, the update just hasnt been applied yet.
[14:42] ravenminer is one of the largest ones too. If they don't upgrade that will be a problem
[14:42] okay good news
[14:42] (PickAxePro sounds like a Ruby book)
[14:43] I strongly feel like getting the word out on ravencoin.org would be beneficial
[14:44] that site is sorely in need of active contribution
[14:44] Anyone can volunteer to contribute
[14:44] <@wolfsokta> Okay, cfox can you talk about the status of unique assets?
[14:44] sure
[14:45] <@wolfsokta> I'll add website to the end of our topics.
[14:45] code is in review and will be on the development branch shortly
[14:45] would it make sense to have a page on the wiki (or somewhere else) that lists the wallet versions run by pools & exchanges?
[14:45] will be in next release
[14:45] furthermore, many sites have friendly link to the standard installers for each platform, if the site linked to the primary installers for each platform to reduce github newb confusion that would be good as well
[14:46] likely to a testnetv5 although that isn't settled
[14:46] <@wolfsokta> Thanks cfox.
[14:46] <@wolfsokta> Are there any questions about unique assets, and how they work?
[14:47] after the # are there any charachters you cant use?
[14:47] will unique assets be constrained by the asset alphanumeric set?
[14:47] ^
[14:47] <@Chatturga> @Urgo there is a page that tracks and shows if they have updated, but it currently doesnt show the actual version that they are on.
[14:47] a-z A-Z 0-9
[14:47] <@Chatturga> https://raven.wiki/wiki/Exchange_notifications#Pools
[14:47] There are a few. Mostly ones that mess with command-line
[14:47] you'll be able to use rpc to do "issueunique MATRIX ['Neo','Tank','Tank Brother']" and it will create three assets for you (MATRIX#Neo, etc.)
[14:47] @cfox - No space
[14:48] @under the unique tags have an expanded set of characters allowed
[14:48] Chatturga: thank you
[14:48] @UJP yes there are some you can't use -- I'll try to post gimmie a sec..
[14:49] Ok. Thank you much!
[14:49] 36^36 assets possible and 62^62 uniques available per asset?
[14:49] <@spyder_> std::regex UNIQUE_TAG_CHARACTERS("^[[email protected]$%&*()[\\]{}<>_.;?\\\\:]+$");
[14:50] regex UNIQUE_TAG_CHARACTERS("^[[email protected]$%&*()[\\]{}<>_.;?\\\\:]+$")
[14:50] oh thanks Mark
[14:51] <@wolfsokta> Okay, next up. I want to thank everybody for helping test the iOS wallet release.
[14:51] <@wolfsokta> We are working with Apple to get the final approval to post it to the App Store
[14:51] @under max asset length is 30, including unique tag
[14:51] Does the RVN wallet have any other cryptos or just RVN?
[14:52] == BruceFenton [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.67.189.233.170] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[14:52] will the android and ios source be migrated to the ravenproject github?
[14:52] I've been adding beta test users. I've added about 80 new users in the last few days.
[14:52] <@wolfsokta> Just RVN, and we want to focus on adding the asset support to the wallet.
[14:53] == Bruce_ [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.67.189.233.170] has quit [Ping timeout: 252 seconds]
[14:53] <@wolfsokta> Yes, the code will also be freely available on GitHub for both iOS and Android. Thank you Roshii!
[14:53] Would you consider the iOS wallet to be a more secure place for one's holdings than say, a Mac connected to the internet?
[14:53] will there be a chance of a more user freindly wallet with better graphics like the iOS on PC?
[14:53] the android wallet is getting updated for DGW, correct?
[14:53] <@wolfsokta> That has come up in our discussion Pizza.
[14:54] QT framework is pretty well baked in and is cross platform. if we get some qt gurus possibly
[14:54] Phones are pretty good because the wallet we forked uses the TPM from modern phones.
[14:54] Most important is to write down and safely store your 12 word seed.
[14:54] TPM?
[14:54] <@wolfsokta> A user friendly wallet is one of our main goals.
[14:55] TPM == Trusted Platform Module
[14:55] Ahhh thanks
[14:55] just please no electron apps. they are full of security holes
[14:55] <@spyder_> It is whats makes your stuffs secure
[14:55] not fit for crypto
[14:55] under: depends on who makes it
[14:55] The interface screenshots I've seen look like Bread/Loaf wallet ... I assume that's what was forked from
[14:55] ;)
[14:56] <@wolfsokta> @roshii did you see the question about the Android wallet and DGW?
[14:56] Yes, it was a fork of breadwallet. We like their security.
[14:56] chromium 58 is the last bundled electron engine and has every vuln documented online by google. so unless you patch every vuln.... methinks not
[14:56] Agreed, great choice
[14:57] <@wolfsokta> @Under, what was your proposal?
[14:58] All asset creation Transactions have a mandatory OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY of 1 year(or some agreed upon time interval), and the 500 RVN goes to a multisig devfund, run by a custodial group. We get: 1) an artificial temporary burn, 2) sustainable community and core development funding for the long term, after OSTK/Medici 3) and the reintroduction of RVN supply at a fixed schedule, enabling the removal of the 42k max cap of total As
[14:58] *im wrong on the 42k figure
[14:58] <@wolfsokta> Interesting...
[14:59] <@wolfsokta> Love to hear others thoughts.
[14:59] Update: I posted a message on the CryptoBridge discord and one of their support members @stepollo#6276 said he believes the coin team is already aware of the fork but he would forward the message about the fork over to them right now anyway
[14:59] Ifs 42 million assets
[14:59] yep.
[15:00] I have a different Idea. If the 500 RVN goes to a dev fund its more centralized. The 500 RVN should go back into the unmined coins so miners can stay for longer.
[15:01] *without a hardfork
[15:01] <@wolfsokta> lol
[15:01] that breaks halving schedule, since utxos cant return to an unmined state.
[15:01] @UJP back into coinbase is interesting. would have to think about how that effects distribution schedule, etc.
[15:01] only way to do that would be to dynamicaly grow max supply
[15:02] and i am concerned already about the max safe integer on various platforms at 21 billion
[15:02] js chokes on ravencoin already
[15:02] <@wolfsokta> Other thoughts on Under's proposal? JS isn't a real language. ;)
[15:02] Well Bitcoin has more than 21 bn Sats
[15:02] Is there somebody who wants to volunteer to fix js.
[15:02] hahaha
[15:03] I honestly would hate for the coins to go to a dev fund. It doesn't seem like Ravencoin to me.
[15:03] Yep, but we're 21 billion x 100,000,000 -- Fits fine in a 64-bit integer, but problematic for some languages.
[15:03] <@wolfsokta> Thanks UJP
[15:04] <@wolfsokta> We're past time but I would like to continue if you folks are up for it.
[15:04] Yeah no coins can go anywhere centrality contorted like a dev fund cause that would mean someone has to run it and the code can’t decide that so it’s destined to break
[15:05] currently and long term with out the financial backing of development then improvements and features will be difficult. we are certainly thankful for our current development model. but if a skunkworks project hits a particular baseline of profitability any reasonable company would terminate it
[15:05] Yes let’s contibue for sure
[15:05] the alternative to a dev fund in my mind would be timelocking those funds back to the issuers change address
[15:06] But we can’t have dev built in to the code — it has to be open source like Bitcoin and monero and Litecoin - it’s got drawbacks but way more advantages- it’s the best model
[15:06] Dev funding
[15:06] i highly reccommend not reducing the utility of raven by removing permanently the supply
[15:07] == BW_ [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.138.68.243.202] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[15:07] timelocking those funds accompllishes the same sacrifice
[15:07] @under timelocking is interesting too
[15:07] How exactly does timelocking work?
[15:07] <@wolfsokta> ^
[15:07] I mean you could change the price of assets with the Block reward halfing.
[15:07] == Roshiix [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.105.67.2.212] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[15:08] funds cant be spent from an address until a certain time passes
[15:08] but in a what magical fairy land do people continue to work for free forever. funding development is a real issue... as much as some might philosphically disagree. its a reality
[15:08] You’d still need a centralized party to decide how to distribute the funds
[15:08] even unofficially blockstream supports bitcoin devs
[15:08] on chain is more transparent imho
[15:09] == Tron_ [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.173.241.144.77] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[15:09] @UJP yes there are unlimited strategies. one factor that I think is v important is giving application developers a way to easily budget for projects which leads to flat fees
[15:09] If the project is a success like many of believe it will be, I believe plenty of people will gladly done to a dev fund. I don't think the 500 should be burned.
[15:09] *donate
[15:09] centralized conservatorship, directed by community voting process
[15:10] == Tron [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.173.241.144.77] has quit [Ping timeout: 252 seconds]
[15:10] <@wolfsokta> Thanks Under, that's an interesting idea that we should continue to discuss in the community. You also mentioned the existing website.
[15:10] It would need to be something where everyone with a QT has a vote
[15:10] think his computer went to sleep again :-/
[15:10] I agree UJP
[15:10] with the website
[15:10] No that’s ico jargon — any development fund tied to code would have to be centralized and would therefor fail
[15:11] ^
[15:11] ^
[15:11] ^
[15:11] dashes model for funding seems to be pretty decentralized
[15:11] community voting etc
[15:11] Once you have a dev fund tied to code then who gets to run it? Who mediates disputes?
[15:11] oh well another discussion
[15:11] Dash has a CEO
[15:12] <@wolfsokta> Yeah, let's keep discussing in the community spaces.
[15:12] Dash does have a good model. It's in my top ten.
[15:12] having the burn go to a dev fund is absolute garbage
[15:12] These dev chats should be more target than broad general discussions — changing the entire nature of the coin and it’s economics is best discussed in the RIPs or other means
[15:13] <@wolfsokta> Yup, let's move on.
[15:13] just becuase existing implementation are garbage doesnt mean that all possible future governance options are garbage
[15:13] <@wolfsokta> To discussing the website scenario mentioned by under.
[15:13] the website needs work. would be best if it could be migrated to github as well.
[15:13] What about this: Anyone can issue a vote once the voting feature has been added, for a cost. The vote would be what the coins could be used for.
[15:14] features for the site that need work are more user friendly links to binaries
[15:14] <@wolfsokta> We investigated how bitcoin has their website in Github to make it easy for contributors to jump in.
[15:14] that means active maintenance of the site instead of its current static nature
[15:15] <@wolfsokta> I really like how it's static html, which makes it super simple to host/make changes.
[15:15] the static nature isn’t due to interface it’s due to no contributors
[15:15] no contribution mechanism has been offered
[15:15] github hosted would allow that
[15:16] We used to run the Bitcoin website from the foundation & the GitHub integration seemed to cause some issues
[15:16] its doesnt necessarily have to be hosted by github but the page source should be on github and contributions could easily be managed and tracked
[15:17] for example when a new release is dropped, the ability for the downlaods section to have platform specific easy links to the general installers is far better for general adoption than pointing users to github releases
[15:18] <@wolfsokta> How do people currently contribute to the existing website?
[15:18] they dont?
[15:18] We did that and it was a complete pain to host and keep working — if someone wants to volunteer to do that work hey can surely make the website better and continually updated — but they could do that in Wordpress also
[15:19] I’d say keep an eye out for volunteers and maybe we can get a group together who can improve the site
[15:19] == digitalvap0r-xmr [[email protected]/web/cgi-irc/kiwiirc.com/ip.67.255.25.134] has joined #ravencoin-dev
[15:19] And they can decide best method
[15:20] I host the source for the explorer on github and anyone can spin it up instantly on a basic aws node. changes can be made to interface etc, and allow for multilingual translations which have been offered by some community members
[15:20] there are models that work. just saying it should be looked at
[15:20] i gotta run thank you all for your contributions
[15:20] <@wolfsokta> I feel we should explore the source for the website being hosted in GitHub and discuss in our next dev meeting.
[15:21] <@Chatturga> Thanks Under!
[15:21] == under [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.72.200.168.56] has quit [Quit: Page closed]
[15:21] <@wolfsokta> Thanks, we also need to drop soon.
[15:21] There is no official site so why care. Someone will do better than the next if RVN is worth it anyway. That's already the case.
[15:21] <@wolfsokta> Let's do 10 mins of open Q&A
[15:22] <@wolfsokta> Go...
[15:23] <@Chatturga> Beuller?
[15:24] No questions ... just a comment that the devs and community are great and I'm happy to be a part of it
[15:24] I think everyone moved to discord. I'll throw this out there. How confident is the dev team that things will be ready for oct 31st?
[15:24] <@wolfsokta> Alright! Thanks everybody for joining us today. Let's plan to get back together as a dev group in a couple of weeks.
[15:25] thanks block!
[15:25] <@wolfsokta> Urgo, very confident
[15:25] Please exclude trolls from discord who havent read the whitepaper
[15:25] great :)
[15:25] "things" will be ready..
[15:25] Next time on discord right?
[15:25] woah why discord?
[15:25] some of the suggestions here are horrid
[15:25] this is better less point
[15:25] == blondfrogs [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.185.245.87.219] has quit [Quit: Page closed]
[15:25] Assets are working well on testnet. Plan is to get as much as we can safely test by Sept 30 -- this includes dev contributions. Oct will be heavy testing and making sure it is safe.
[15:26] people
[15:26] <@wolfsokta> Planning on same time, same IRC channel.
[15:26] == BW_ [[email protected]/web/freenode/ip.138.68.243.202] has quit [Quit: Page closed]
[15:26] @xmr any in particular?
[15:27] (or is "here" discord?)
[15:27] Cheers - Tron
[15:27] "Cheers - Tron" - Tron
submitted by Chatturga to Ravencoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

How to move Bitcoin data directory on MAC OSX to external drive.

Assumptions: A) Your current folder for your bitcoin data is here: "~/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin" or here "/Users//Library/Application Support/Bitcoin" B) Your current folder for your bitcoin-qt application is here: /Applications/Bitcoin-qt.app C) You have an external drive named "My Passport" and your Finder, Preferences settings are set to display Devices. Select Finder, Preferences and tick the box to the left of External disks.
To do this on a MAC running OSX 10.9 follow these instructions: 1)Open Finder. 2) In Finder, using the Finder menu bar, select: Go, Go To Folder... , and type the ~/Library and press RETURN. 3) In Finder, navigate to the "Application Support" folder. You will see the Bitcoin directory. 4) In Finder, select, or highlight, this folder, then select: Edit, Copy "Bitcoin" from menu bar. 5) In Finder, navigate to your external drive "My Passport". 6) In Finder, create a folder called "Applications" on your "My Passport" external drive (see step "C" above after connecting external drive, if necessary). 7) In Finder, navigate to the newly created "Applications" directory. 8 ) In Finder, select Edit, Paste Item to start copying the "Bitcoin" directory to your external drive's "/Volumes/My Passport/Applications/" folder. 9) Once this completes and both the "~/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin" and "/Volumes/My Passport/Applications/Bitcoin" folders are identical. Rename the Bitcoin directory in "~/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin" to "~/Library/Application Support/BitcoinOLD". 10) Launch Terminal from LaunchPad, Utilities or from Applications in Finder. 11) CAREFUL: At the Terminal prompt type: "cd ~/Library/Application\ Support" no quotes. Yes, that "\" slash is necessary. 12) Type: "ls -laf" no quotes, and insure that the Bitcoin directory is now called BitcoinOLD. 13) Type: "ln -s /Volumes/My\ Passport/Applications/Bitcoin/ ./Bitcoin" no quotes. this command actually creates a symbolic link to your external drive. Yes, that slash "\" just after the "My" is necessary to account for the space in "My Passport". 14) Launch Bitcoin-qt from Applications in Finder and let the "Reindexing blocks on disk.." process complete. It should not be downloading anything until this completes and then will download only those blocks since your last synchronize to the Bitcoin network. 15) Once this completes, delete the BitcoinOLD folder using finder. "~/Library/Application Support/BitcoinOLD". Was this helpful? Donate: 1FCZzLuH1MAa8UDaHnZKHnXmNcQRBA7Xme
submitted by duncwaj to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Core 0.12.1 released | Wladimir J. van der Laan | Apr 15 2016

Wladimir J. van der Laan on Apr 15 2016:
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA512
Bitcoin Core version 0.12.1 is now available from:
https://bitcoin.org/bin/bitcoin-core-0.12.1/
Or through bittorrent:
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:25c4df2a822e840e972a50a31095632d87efadab&dn;=bitcoin-core-0.12.1&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.publicbt.com%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.ccc.de%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.leechers-paradise.org%3A6969&ws;=https%3A%2F%2Fbitcoin.org%2Fbin%2F
This is a new minor version release, including the BIP9, BIP68 and BIP112
softfork, various bugfixes and updated translations.
Please report bugs using the issue tracker at github:
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues
To receive security and update notifications, please subscribe to
https://bitcoincore.org/en/list/announcements/join/.
Upgrading and downgrading

How to Upgrade
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely
shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the
installer (on Windows) or just copy over /Applications/Bitcoin-Qt (on Mac) or
bitcoind/bitcoin-qt (on Linux).
Downgrade warning

Downgrade to a version < 0.12.0

Because release 0.12.0 and later will obfuscate the chainstate on every
fresh sync or reindex, the chainstate is not backwards-compatible with
pre-0.12 versions of Bitcoin Core or other software.
If you want to downgrade after you have done a reindex with 0.12.0 or later,
you will need to reindex when you first start Bitcoin Core version 0.11 or
earlier.
Notable changes

First version bits BIP9 softfork deployment
This release includes a soft fork deployment to enforce BIP68,
BIP112 and BIP113 using the BIP9 deployment mechanism.
The deployment sets the block version number to 0x20000001 between
midnight 1st May 2016 and midnight 1st May 2017 to signal readiness for
deployment. The version number consists of 0x20000000 to indicate version
bits together with setting bit 0 to indicate support for this combined
deployment, shown as "csv" in the getblockchaininfo RPC call.
For more information about the soft forking change, please see
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/7648
This specific backport pull-request can be viewed at
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/7543
BIP68 soft fork to enforce sequence locks for relative locktime
BIP68 introduces relative lock-time consensus-enforced semantics of
the sequence number field to enable a signed transaction input to remain
invalid for a defined period of time after confirmation of its corresponding
outpoint.
For more information about the implementation, see
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/7184
BIP112 soft fork to enforce OP_CHECKSEQUENCEVERIFY
BIP112 redefines the existing OP_NOP3 as OP_CHECKSEQUENCEVERIFY (CSV)
for a new opcode in the Bitcoin scripting system that in combination with
BIP68 allows execution pathways of a script to be restricted based
on the age of the output being spent.
For more information about the implementation, see
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/7524
BIP113 locktime enforcement soft fork
Bitcoin Core 0.11.2 previously introduced mempool-only locktime
enforcement using GetMedianTimePast(). This release seeks to
consensus enforce the rule.
Bitcoin transactions currently may specify a locktime indicating when
they may be added to a valid block. Current consensus rules require
that blocks have a block header time greater than the locktime specified
in any transaction in that block.
Miners get to choose what time they use for their header time, with the
consensus rule being that no node will accept a block whose time is more
than two hours in the future. This creates a incentive for miners to
set their header times to future values in order to include locktimed
transactions which weren't supposed to be included for up to two more
hours.
The consensus rules also specify that valid blocks may have a header
time greater than that of the median of the 11 previous blocks. This
GetMedianTimePast() time has a key feature we generally associate with
time: it can't go backwards.
BIP113 specifies a soft fork enforced in this release that
weakens this perverse incentive for individual miners to use a future
time by requiring that valid blocks have a computed GetMedianTimePast()
greater than the locktime specified in any transaction in that block.
Mempool inclusion rules currently require transactions to be valid for
immediate inclusion in a block in order to be accepted into the mempool.
This release begins applying the BIP113 rule to received transactions,
so transaction whose time is greater than the GetMedianTimePast() will
no longer be accepted into the mempool.
Implication for miners: you will begin rejecting transactions that
would not be valid under BIP113, which will prevent you from producing
invalid blocks when BIP113 is enforced on the network. Any
transactions which are valid under the current rules but not yet valid
under the BIP113 rules will either be mined by other miners or delayed
until they are valid under BIP113. Note, however, that time-based
locktime transactions are more or less unseen on the network currently.
Implication for users: GetMedianTimePast() always trails behind the
current time, so a transaction locktime set to the present time will be
rejected by nodes running this release until the median time moves
forward. To compensate, subtract one hour (3,600 seconds) from your
locktimes to allow those transactions to be included in mempools at
approximately the expected time.
For more information about the implementation, see
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/6566
Miscellaneous
The p2p alert system is off by default. To turn on, use -alert with
startup configuration.
0.12.1 Change log

Detailed release notes follow. This overview includes changes that affect
behavior, not code moves, refactors and string updates. For convenience in locating
the code changes and accompanying discussion, both the pull request and
git merge commit are mentioned.

RPC and other APIs

  • - #7739 7ffc2bd Add abandoned status to listtransactions (jonasschnelli)

Block and transaction handling

  • - #7543 834aaef Backport BIP9, BIP68 and BIP112 with softfork (btcdrak)

P2P protocol and network code

    • #7804 90f1d24 Track block download times per individual block (sipa)
    • #7832 4c3a00d Reduce block timeout to 10 minutes (laanwj)

Validation

    • #7821 4226aac init: allow shutdown during 'Activating best chain...' (laanwj)
    • #7835 46898e7 Version 2 transactions remain non-standard until CSV activates (sdaftuar)

Build system

    • #7487 00d57b4 Workaround Travis-side CI issues (luke-jr)
    • #7606 a10da9a No need to set -L and --location for curl (MarcoFalke)
    • #7614 ca8f160 Add curl to packages (now needed for depends) (luke-jr)
    • #7776 a784675 Remove unnecessary executables from gitian release (laanwj)

Wallet

  • - #7715 19866c1 Fix calculation of balances and available coins. (morcos)

Miscellaneous

    • #7617 f04f4fd Fix markdown syntax and line terminate LogPrint (MarcoFalke)
    • #7747 4d035bc added depends cross compile info (accraze)
    • #7741 a0cea89 Mark p2p alert system as deprecated (btcdrak)
    • #7780 c5f94f6 Disable bad-chain alert (btcdrak)
Credits

Thanks to everyone who directly contributed to this release:
    • accraze
    • Alex Morcos
    • BtcDrak
    • Jonas Schnelli
    • Luke Dashjr
    • MarcoFalke
    • Mark Friedenbach
    • NicolasDorier
    • Pieter Wuille
    • Suhas Daftuar
    • Wladimir J. van der Laan
As well as everyone that helped translating on Transifex.
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1
iQEcBAEBCgAGBQJXELrMAAoJEHSBCwEjRsmm75EH/0iyqFxXuJDbfzMmBbMTkXD2
/CXEeyMvs62F2ZeODE0SSqo9sXo4foiT9WI5Dq7BwAiF6jh/XE4QwBvc91BbPyGZ
1nOGEab+oe37xEOkn8MyGbHfCutsUldyKltVQjA3y685MxlSgTjl/nX6Pbpbxped
vZRog3KHRrpWAMrHdi6p/xgqX0ajxE6K1P16JMOx4W/gE9QgOPyy7+l/4WT6SyBj
k/pOLqJc+yQIOa9szS4pjLUqaSOirhsjXfro9FYjHqiTWQwAdvuK4xXgo1GrGIW1
PWs419uLmGl4bhg9jdY6v+PyPz4iUilRzoixVi8op1Rt9/AoNN1ViJ/LT15Hagw=
=h4Wp
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
original: http://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2016-April/012607.html
submitted by dev_list_bot to bitcoin_devlist [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to BTC_Reviews [link] [comments]

How to prune the blockchain in Bitcoin-Qt Start Mining Dogecoin With Your Mac in Under 5 Minutes Quick Fix  Bitconnect QT Wallet Out of Sync ️ Mac OSX prevent bitcoin-qt client from crashing on the mac Download, Verify, and Install Bisq: Linux and macOS

Bitcoin in becoming very popular day by day. So, we have brought to you the 8 Best Bitcoin Mining Software for Mac, Windows and Linux. Read On! Download the latest version of Bitcoin for Mac - Experimental digital currency.. Read 7 user reviews of Bitcoin on MacUpdate. Bitcoin software has both a graphical interface called bitcoin-qt and a console interface, bitcoind. If the first is convenient for human use, then without a text it is quite difficult to make an online store or any other service that accepts bitcoins as a payment. About it and speech will go. To work you need to run one instance of bitcoin as a daemon, so he worked as a full-fledged host on ... How to Verify a Bitcoin Core Download on Mac By Rich Apodaca Updated December 12th, 2017. Bitcoin Core is the first implementation of the Bitcoin protocol and is widely-regarded as the de facto standard. Nevertheless, users running this software are trusting it to keep private keys safe and faithfully report network activity. To reduce the risk of running malware, users can verify the ... With one piece of software you will be easily watching supported exchanges and cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, ethereum, ripple,monero,neo,bitcoin cash,litecoin,cardano,iota and many others. Download für MacOS - Server 1 --> 9,99 € Download Neueste Version. Herunterladen und Installieren Crypto Terminal. Download für PC - Server 1 --> MAC: Download für MacOS - Server 1 --> 9,99 € Vielen ...

[index] [16271] [29972] [4501] [23555] [45370] [45428] [25197] [3828] [38397] [3602]

How to prune the blockchain in Bitcoin-Qt

Multi-Asset Wallet Mac OS X EXODUS Supports Bitcoin Litecoin Dash Dogecoin - Duration: 2:21. CALI CRYPTO 4,538 views. 2:21. How to start Bitcoin mining for beginners (SUPER EASY) ... Quick Fix Bitconnect QT Wallet Out of Sync 🖥️ Mac OSX - Duration: 5:30. Nad Daniels 2,327 views. 5:30. CARNIVAL SCAM SCIENCE- and how to win - Duration: 11:37. Mark Rober Recommended for ... Mine took 6 hours to sync to the blockchain!! In this video I will show you how to quickly fix the syncing issue with Bitconnect QT wallet on a Mac. If this fix does not work please CLICK the ... New RPC commands: - getblockchaininfo - getblockcount - getpeerinfo - getconnectioncount - stop Linux terminal new stuff: watch * All other commands have been covered in previous videos www ... You will need to use this code in Terminal to launch Bitcoin-Qt from now on. To launch terminal press cmd + spacebar, then search terminal. Following this guide will prune the blockchain on your ...

#